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Posted by: Amanda McCuaig on October 16, 2013 at 1:42 pm

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Click here for full speaker bios

Interesting Vancouver returns for a sixth year of sharing
how the typical can actually be intriguing

(VANCOUVER) – What makes someone interesting? Is it their stories? Their life experience? Maybe it’s their drag persona. Vancouverites can find out what makes 10 of their neighbours interesting on November 8 at the Museum of Vancouver when Interesting Vancouver returns for its sixth year.

Interesting Vancouver is an event that seeks to reveal the richness of Vancouver’s cultural DNA through stories exploring possibility, curiosity and adventure. Ten Vancouverites drawn from the city’s diverse and multi-disciplinary fields are selected to speak for 10 minutes each and answer questions from the audience. With no themes or agendas, it becomes a remarkable opportunity for the audience to also reflect on what’s interesting in their own lives.

“The thing I love most about Interesting Vancouver is that the only theme is ‘interesting’,” says Mark Busse. “No corporate overlords, no profit motives, no self-promotion. Just a room full of fascinating people sharing their hobbies, obsessions, and passions intended to expand the collective vision of what is uniquely possible in our city and by its citizens.”

In addition to speakers, guests will be invited to smash one of Meaghan Kennedy’s piñatas and be treated to a musical performance by CR Avery.

Speakers at the 2013 Interesting Vancouver include:

  • Steve Fisher, Founder and Experience Architect of The Republic of Quality who will share his story about faith, science, love, leaving religion, and the subsequent repercussions.
  • Lynn Hill, curator of Contemporary First Nations exhibitions will share her story of climbing the career ladder.
  • Stephane Mouttet, Chef Concierge of the Shangri-La Hotel on being reunited with his biological parents.
  • Yared Nigussu, Ethiopian artist on the risk of first impressions.
  • Meaghan Kennedy, Piñata Artist on how piñatas have changed her life.
  • Ken Tsui, pop-up event organizer on how Wu-Tang Clan’s debut album informed his understanding of the personal voice.
  • Dave “Peach Cobblah” Deveau, playwright, drag queen, event organizer on how necessity is the root of creativity.
  • Robert Rietveld, former army, navy, and air force executive on Canadian war heros.
  • CR Avery, musician on what it’s like to be a true East Vander.
     

For more information and ticket sales, please visit www.interestingvancouver.com and http://interestingvancouver2013.eventbrite.com. Tickets go on sale on October 16.

 

 

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Click here for full speaker bios

 

MEDIA CONTACT:

Amanda McCuaig

Marketing Officer, Museum of Vancouver

604.730.5309

amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

 

For additional information visit:

www.facebook.com/interestingvancouver

twitter.com/interestingvan

www.museumofvancouver.ca

 

About Interesting Vancouver

In 2011, the Museum of Vancouver became the official co-host and presenting venue. 2013 sponsors include Driftwood Beer, Prospect Winery, The Butler Did It, Eventbrite, MediaTemple, GDCBC, The Hot Charlottes, Industrial Brand, and Kirsti Wakelin.

Interesting Vancouver is an offshoot of Interesting, an event that takes place in cities worldwide and was founded by Russell Davies. Brett McFarlane founded Interesting Vancouver in 2008.

About the Museum of Vancouver
The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization with the mandate to hold a mirror to the city and lead provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.

 

 

 

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Posted by: Amanda McCuaig on September 25, 2013 at 2:47 pm

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 18, 2013

 

MOV Announces 2013 City Shaper Awards Honourees: Ray Spaxman, MEC, and Tamara Vrooman

 

(Vancouver, BC) — The Museum of Vancouver will present its City Shaper Awards to recipients Ray Spaxman, Mountain Equipment Co-Op, and Tamara Vrooman at the MOV Legacy Dinner, presented by Maynards, this upcoming Wednesday, October 2, 2013.

Honoured for his work as a visionary architect and city planner, Ray Spaxman will be taking home the MOV Legacy Award. “This award is a wonderful recognition of the city planning work undertaken in the ’70s and ’80s that led to the status Vancouver has come to enjoy in the world,” says Spaxman. “It is the result of the creative synergy between politicians, staff, and citizens in those two decades.”

The Livable City Award, being presented for its first time this year, will go to Mountain Equipment Co-Op for their pioneering business. “Vancouver gave rise to Mountain Equipment Co-op in 1971,” explains Shona McGlashan, representing Mountain Equipment Co-Op. “Since then, MEC has grown to become Canada’s most vibrant outdoor retailer … We are delighted to be recognized as a city shaper in the city that helped shape our identity.”

Finally, the 2013 Emerging City Visionary Award will be going to Tamara Vrooman, CEO of Vancity for her remarkable work. “I am honored to receive an award that supports a vision of everyone working together to meet the long-term needs of the community and the people who live and work in this city,” remarks Vrooman. “I’m truly excited about the future opportunities that will support us as we continue to create a city that is innovative, sustainable and inclusive.”

Recipients were chosen by a committee of city historians, urban planners, business and philanthropic influencers, and representatives of the MOV Board of Directors.

“At the MOV we see the city as a living artifact, and part of that is recognizing the work that has been done by people to make it what it is today,” explains Nancy Noble, Museum of Vancouver CEO. “In this second year of awards we’re really starting to see what incredible minds and initiative we have within our city, and we’re excited to be recognizing these three for their contributions to our city’s story.”

Taking place in the MOV’s landmark building in Vanier Park, the Legacy Dinner will offer guests an exclusive museum experience complete with live music, fine wine, and scrumptious food. Visit the MOV’s website at www.museumofvancouver.ca/legacydinner  to purchase tickets, for background on the honorees, and further details on how the awards were selected.

The Museum of Vancouver is thrilled to partner with Maynards Auctioneers on this year’s dinner and thanks them for their ongoing support.  Other sponsors include BDO, Prospect Winery, The Butler Did It Catering, and Lonsdale Rentals.

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The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization with the mandate to hold a mirror to the city and lead provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.

 

Media Contact

Amanda McCuaig, Marketing Officer

T: 604.730.5309    C : 604.312.8791

E: amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

 

About Ray Spaxman

Ray Spaxman, LL.D, ARIBA, MRTPI, FCIP, RPP, Hon AIBC; Architect

Ray is an architect and planner with over 50 years of experience in planning and urban design, with more accomplishments to his name than can be noted in this short description. During his time with the City of Vancouver he established public participation and community engagement in planning, helped in developing the City's View Protection Policies, and produced plans for Downtown, West End, False Creek, Granville Island, Kitsilano, Champlain Heights, Kensington, Southlands, and Fairview Slopes. Since then he has developed urban design projects both here and abroad, including Vancouver's High Building Policies.

 

About MEC

In 1971, a group of west coast mountaineers made a decision to do business differently, and they turned an unconventional retail model into a thriving business. Today, MEC is Canada's largest co-operative by membership and is the leading specialty retailer of outdoor clothing, gear, and accessories. MEC's purpose is to inspire and enable all Canadians to live active outdoor lifestyles.

 

About Tamara Vrooman

Tamara Vrooman; Chief Executive Officer, Vancity

As Chief Executive Officer of Canada's largest community credit union, Tamara Vrooman harnesses the strength of Vancity to fulfill its vision of redefining wealth for members and communities. Under Tamara's leadership, Vancity became the first carbon neutral credit union in North America, the first Canadian financial institution invited to join Global Alliance for Banking on Values (GABV), and the largest organization in Canada with a living wage policy.

 

 

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Posted by: Amanda McCuaig on September 5, 2013 at 1:46 pm

EARLY MEDIA RELEASE

September 5, 2013

 

Exhibition explores the “Buddha-like” Daniel Evan White and his distinct west coast architecture

 

I had the impression of being in the presence of a private man, a man who had a Buddha-like quality and who made a house speak the way a Dylan Thomas poem makes a grown man weep or a Lawren Harris clean line painting evokes the grandeur of Canada.”

–Bruce Fraser, in his 2012 eulogy to Daniel Evan White

 

(VANCOUVER, BC) – While Arthur Erickson, Fred Hollingsworth, and Ron Thom garnered international fame, their contemporary – Vancouver born and raised Daniel Evan White – quietly broke boundaries while raising stunning houses amongst Vancouver’s rugged landscape. His visionary career now comes to life in Play House: The architecture of Daniel Evan White, opening October 16, 2013 at the Museum of Vancouver, giving Vancouverites the first glimpse of one of their most remarkable citizens.

“Dan’s work not so much fits its site as becomes one with it,” explains co-curator Greg Johnson. “His clever architectural innovations allowed his buildings to match their dramatic west coast sites.”

White was little known due to his tendency to avoid publicity, despite continual inquiries from magazines, journals, and scholars, and a loyal roster of customers who had him build for them again and again. His name may not ring instant bells, but chances are you’ll recognize some of the more than 100+ Vancouver residential projects he was involved in, 36 of which are highlighted in Play House.

Play House ventures through Daniel Evan White’s mind, hands, and eyes to explore the creative process that transforms the dream home from desire into reality.  The exhibition includes stories from clients and contractors, a replica of the Máté House built to 1:4 scale, projections, smaller models, 3D computer models, and an area where visitors can get hands on with some of Dan’s favourite geometric shapes.

“Dan was a very quiet, modest man,” explains Martin Lewis, Play House co-curator and former associate of White’s. “Those who worked with Dan saw him as an innovator of design. Some of Dan’s ideas were so unconventional at the time that they must have seemed like sheer folly. But now we see not only that they worked, but that they have withstood the test of time.”

The exhibition refreshes our ideas of the typical house and its functions, with each featured project becoming a commentary on contemporary culture, innovation, risk, and the idea of play. Yet again, the MOV strikes out to introduce Vancouverites to one of their own incredibly talented people.

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The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization with the mandate to hold a mirror to the city and lead provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.

Media Contact
Amanda McCuaig, Marketing Officer
T: 604.730.5309    C : 604.312.8791
E: amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca
 

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Posted by: Amanda McCuaig on July 9, 2013 at 1:44 pm

­­­MEDIA RELEASE
July 13, 2013

MOV and partners to take over Granville Street in day of spectacular transformation and playful design

(VANCOUVER, BC) — On Saturday, July 13 the Museum of Vancouver and its partners invite the public downtown, to help enliven and transform the 700 block of Granville Street using hundreds of super-sized polystyrene building blocks.

“MOV’s Upcycled Urbanism challenges Vancouverites to do more than just talk about urban design, public space, and environmental sustainability. It brings people together to build their ideas in the public realm—but just for one day,” says Charles Montgomery, Curatorial Associate at the Museum of Vancouver. “The project takes advantage of pioneering work by Langley-based Mansonville Plastics, which rescued polystyrene salvaged from the construction projects around the lower mainland and ground it down for use in new blocks. After our event, materials will be returned for a third round of recycling.”

The project was born from the common aspiration of UBC’s School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture (SALA), the Vancouver Public Space Network, Maker Faire Vancouver, Spacing Magazine, and the MOV to offer people new ways to re-imagine public design. Three  teams will use the blocks to create giant games, social machines, and art installations.

The public is invited to watch, encourage builders, and experience the interactive landscape at any time between 10:00am and 6:00pm. Orientations for anyone who wants to join a build team will be at 10:00am, 1:00pm, and 5:00pm.

“This project has been an exhilarating and productive challenge for SALA students,” says SALA lecturer Bill Pechet.  “They were asked to design beautiful block prototypes that anyone could use in construction. We’ll be putting the premise of the project and hundreds of these interlocking pieces to the test on July 13.”

People of all ages are welcome to participate. Register by emailing upcycledurbanism@museumofvancouver.ca

Upcycled Urbanism is a Museum of Vancouver initiative in partnership with the School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture (SALA) at the University of British Columbia, the Vancouver Public Space Network (VPSN), Maker Faire Vancouver, and Spacing Magazine, with generous additional support from SALA, Mansonville Plastics, and the Vancouver Foundation.

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The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization with the mandate to hold a mirror to the city and lead provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.

 

Media Contact

Amanda McCuaig, Marketing Officer

T: 604.730.5309    C : 604.312.8791

E: amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

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Posted by: Amanda McCuaig on April 25, 2013 at 10:55 am

MEDIA RELEASE
APRIL 24, 2013

Will the Museum of Vancouver be moving?

Vancouver, BC — The Museum of Vancouver (MOV) has been taking deliberate steps towards securing its position as a thriving part of Vancouver’s cultural landscape for generations to come. Today the museum announced its commitment to find an optimal location that will complement its provocative, award-winning programs and exhibitions.

The MOV has occupied its current location in Vanier Park since 1967. While the location is picturesque it is not without its challenges. A study is being conducted by AldrichPears Associates (APA) to define a functional program for the Museum in an optimal scenario.

“We are constantly asked about our location,” said Nancy Noble, Museum of Vancouver’s CEO. “With this study we will finally have a definitive answer to the question ‘should we stay or should we go?’”

Through the study, the Museum is examining many options for its location, the current Vancouver Art Gallery space being only one. The functional program is informed by current operations, industry best-practices, the vision for the visitor experience at the Museum and the anticipated visitation levels at the current location as well as other locations throughout Vancouver.

Isaac Marshall, Principal at APA, said, “There are so many opportunities in Vancouver right now. It is the perfect time for the MOV to prove it is ready to lead the world in redefining the role of a city museum.”

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About the Museum of Vancouver
The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization with the mandate to hold a mirror up to the city and lead provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.
http://www.museumofvancouver.ca

Media Contact:
Amanda McCuaig
604-730-5309
amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

About AldrichPears Associates
AldrichPears Associates is a planning and design firm based in Vancouver, BC that provides interpretive planning and exhibit design services for cultural attractions around the world.
http://www.aldrichpears.com

Media Contact:
Elaine Edge
604-669-7044
marketing@aldrichpears.com

 

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Posted by: Amanda McCuaig on April 11, 2013 at 3:22 pm

MEDIA RELEASE
April 30, 2013

Museum of Vancouver first North American cultural institution to take augmented reality “to the streets”

The Visible City now available for iPhone and Android

Vancouver, BC, Canada – April 30, 2013 – Today the Museum of Vancouver (MOV) launches the Visible City, a virtual exhibition of Vancouver’s neon history, developed in partnership with the Virtual Museum of Canada (VMC) at virtualmuseum.ca, an initiative of the Department of Canadian Heritage. In doing so it becomes the first cultural institution in North America to have taken augmented reality technology to the streets.

The Visible City is a free app and virtual exhibition that allows users to discover the rise, fall and revival of neon in Vancouver. The app provides walking tours of Vancouver’s most colorful neighborhoods and users can actively contribute to the history of 57 of Vancouver’s neon signs by uploading their own stories, sharing them with others and voting on their favorite signs and places.

At the MOV, we consider the entire city our artifact, and the Visible City is one of those ways we can take history beyond the walls of the Museum,” explains Hanna Cho, MOV Curator of Audience Engagement. “The app is like taking a piece of Vancouver’s history around with you in your pocket – but it’s a piece of history that you can actively contribute to.”

Users can explore two digitally guided walking tours through Vancouver’s cultural heart (Granville Street) and the city’s original downtown hub (Chinatown and Hastings Street). By holding their cameras up to the present day scene, they can see the same Vancouver location appear as it did in the 1950s, 60s or 70s. Users can then listen to over 40 pre-curated stories on audio and video told by  celebrated Vancouverites like Dal Richards (big band musician), Joe Keithley (of DOA), Judy Graves (City of Vancouver advocate for the homeless) and more.

The Visible City is free to download and is available via the iTunes App Store and Google Play. The Visible City gratefully acknowledges the funding support of the VMC at www.virtualmuseum.ca, an initiative of the Department of Canadian Heritage. For more information visit www.museumofvancouver.ca/visiblecity

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The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization with the mandate to hold a mirror to the city and lead provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.

Media Contact
Amanda McCuaig, Marketing Officer
T: 604.730.5309    C : 604.312.8791
E: amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

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Posted by: Amanda McCuaig on March 27, 2013 at 10:11 am

MEDIA RELEASE
March 27, 2013

Foncie Pulice, Vancouver’s most prolific street photographer, in retrospective at Museum of Vancouver

(VANCOUVER, BC) –Taking thousands of photos each year and about 15 million photos over his lifetime, Foncie Pulice was Vancouver’s most prolific and beloved street photographer. Many long-time Vancouver families have Foncie photos in their albums – and the stories to go with them. Foncie’s Fotos: Man on the Street, opening at the Museum of Vancouver on June 6, 2013, reveals the life and workstyle of this Vancouver photographer.

Foncie Pulice shot from locations along Granville and Hastings for almost 40 years. He photographed without discrimination, capturing the full range of ages, ethnicities, and classes that thronged downtown. At a time when personal cameras were rare and family portraits were expensive, Foncie sometimes created the only surviving image of a family member.

“Foncie captured people in motion, literally in mid-stride, stepping with energy into Vancouver’s future,” explains Joan Siedl, exhibition curator. “His camera lens was fixed at about waist height and pointing slightly up, so that everyone appears slightly larger than life, commanding their patch of sidewalk for an instant.”

Foncie claimed that he destroyed all of his negatives, but he did not. The exhibition will include projected images from a surviving reel of over 10,000 negatives shot in May and June 1968 on Granville near Robson. If you happened to walk south on the east side of the 700 block of Granville Street that spring, Foncie may have taken your photo as you passed.

Foncie’s camera, which he donated to the Museum when he retired in 1979, is a gimcrack assemblage of war surplus metal plate on wheels decorated with a red plastic lightening bolt. Its flash was powered by a car battery. The camera used large reels of movie film so that Foncie could shoot for hours on end.

The exhibition has worked in collaboration with the Knowledge Network, which is producing shorts about Foncie that will be shown in the exhibition, as well as a feature documentary that will premiere later in the year. Those with photo taken by Foncie are encouraged to upload and share via “Foncie’s Corner” on the Knowledge Network (fonciescorner.knowledge.ca).  

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The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization with the mandate to hold a mirror to the city and lead provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.

Media Contact
Amanda McCuaig, Marketing Officer
T: 604.730.5309    C : 604.312.8791
E: amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

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Posted by: Amanda McCuaig on February 27, 2013 at 12:57 pm

MEDIA RELEASE
Feb. 27, 2013

MOV invites Vancouverites to envision—and create—new urban designs
Upcycled Urbanism provides an opportunity for everyone to design and build new public space interventions together

(VANCOUVER, BC) — The Museum of Vancouver continues to push the boundaries of the role of museums by partnering with local organizations to allow Vancouverites the chance to learn with their hands. Upcycled Urbanism, a series of creative workshops starting in March, invites us to reimagine and rebuild Vancouver’s public realm.

“Have you ever wished you could redesign and rebuild part of your city? This is your chance,” says Charles Montgomery, Curatorial Associate at Museum of Vancouver. “Upcycled Urbanism invites people to do more than just talk about design. It will bring people together to actually build their ideas.”

Working alongside design professionals from UBC’s School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture (SALA), Vancouver Public Space Network, Maker Faire Vancouver, and Spacing Magazine, teams will brainstorm, sketch, and model their public space creations using modular blocks designed by students from SALA.

Building blocks are made of expanded polystyrene that contain material salvaged from the construction of the Port Mann Bridge. The project takes advantage of pioneering work by Langley-based Mansonville Plastics, which rescues old EPS blocks bound for the landfill and grinds the material down for use in new blocks.

“By creating a space where people can ‘learn with their hands’ as well as with each other, we open up the conversations people can have about design and public space by moving it away from policy and academia, and by making sense of it together,” says Hanna Cho, Curator of Engagement and Dialogue at MOV.

“The project has given SALA students the opportunity to explore issues of sustainability by working with recycled polystyrene to create a set of building blocks," says SALA lecturer, Bill Pechet. "Now it's up to our partners and the public to envision how they can be imaginatively assembled to transform public spaces."

In July, teams will come together again at an outdoor design/build spectacle to create life-sized renditions of the creations that come out of March’s workshops. Everyone is welcome to participate. Register at www.museumofvancouver.ca/programs.

Upcycled Urbanism is a partnership between theMuseum of Vancouver, the School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture (SALA) at the University of British Columbia, the Vancouver Public Space Network (VPSN), Maker Faire Vancouver, and Spacing Magazine, with generous additional support from SALA, Mansonville Plastics, and the Vancouver Foundation.

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For more information, contact:

Charles Montgomery,
Curatorial Associate, Engagement and Dialogue
Museum of Vancouver
cmontgomery@museumofvancouver.ca
778.829.5421

 

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Posted by: Amanda McCuaig on February 21, 2013 at 9:34 am

For Immediate release
February 20, 2013

Popular Museum of Vancouver pillows gain wider market with Pillow Décor Ltd

(Vancouver, BC) — The Museum of Vancouver’s popular bus-scroll pillows hit the market only last November and were quick to sell out at all partnering locations. Now, Pillow Decor Ltd. is partnering with the Museum of Vancouver (MOV) to manufacture more of the unique line of memorabilia throw pillows to be sold online. The first of these pillows are already being sold as part of a new and innovative retail program that is being piloted by the museum.

“We are very excited to be working with the MOV,” said Jonathan Forgacs, co-owner at Pillow Decor. “We are all used to seeing images of cities such as Paris, New York and London applied to home décor products. You just have to take one look through the MOV’s collection to see that the possibilities for Vancouver themed products are endless.” 

The throw pillows are created with licensed designs inspired from some of the estimated 70,000 artifacts held by the museum. With limited retail space at the Museum, the MOV has partnered with local Vancouver retailers to stock and sell the pillows, along with a range of other products including coasters, key chains and carpets. “Throw pillows serve as an excellent canvas upon which to display historical images from Vancouver’s colourful past,” said Kate Follington, director of development at the MOV. “Pillow Décor is creating some wonderful vintage style pillows that we believe will have appeal even beyond the Vancouver market.”

The MOV throw pillows can be bought online at PillowDecor.com as well as through several Vancouver retailers. A list of these retailers can be found on the MOV website at www.museumofvancouver.ca/retail.

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About the MOV
The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization with the mandate to hold a mirror to the city and lead provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.

About Pillow Decor Ltd.
Pillow Decor is a specialty retailer and wholesaler of decorative throw pillows. Pillow Decor’s website, www.pillowdecor.com, offers consumers a selection of over 1000 quality throw pillows in a wide range of colors, styles and designs.  Pillow Decor’s wholesale division supplies pillows to the retail, hospitality, promotional and special event markets.  Pillow Decor’s head office is located at #101-196 West 3rd Avenue, Vancouver, BC V5Y1E9, Canada.

Contact:
Jonathan Forgacs
Pillow Decor Ltd.
jonathan@pillowdecor.com
(604) 879-8488

 

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Posted by: Amanda McCuaig on January 17, 2013 at 2:53 pm

For Immediate Release
January 17, 2013

Winter Wander celebrates Vanier Park, a Vancouver hidden treasure

(Vancouver, BC) – The six cultural institutions of Vanier Park are celebrating their Kitsilano location again during their second Winter Wander. Vancouverites are invited to attend all locations on Saturday, January 26, for one significantly reduced rate.

“We had such a wonderful turn out at our first Winter Wander that we’ve been looking forward to doing it again all year,” says Simon Robinson, Executive Director of the Vancouver Maritime Museum “For us, it’s a great way to showcase what’s down here in Vanier Park, and to work together as institutions. This park and its venues are truly a Vancouver treasure.”

Vanier Park is home to the Vancouver Maritime Museum, the Museum of Vancouver, the H.R. MacMillan Space Centre, Bard on the Beach, the Vancouver Academy of Music, and the City of Vancouver Archives.

The Winter Wander in Vanier Park is a one day event in which Vancouverites and their families can enjoy a taste of what Vanier Park’s cultural institutions have to offer for one rate that includes admission to all venues. Adult admission will be just $5 to visit all locations, and children 16 and under will visit for free.

“When the Royal Canadian Air Force station that occupied this area was decommissioned in the 1960’s the Vancouver Parks Board took over management of the land,” explains Robinson. “This enabled the space to become public park land and a cultural hub. It's very unique, but sometimes overlooked. Adjacent to the downtown heart of our city, today it’s a place where Vancouverite’s can spend the day enjoying the beauty of the park, visiting museums, taking in a play, discovering music, or learning about Vancouver’s history.”

In addition to visiting the museums, Winter Wanderers will be able to enjoy a talk by Christopher Gaze of Bard on the Beach, performances by Vancouver Academy of Music students, and visiting food trucks.

For full schedule of events, visit www.museumofvancouver/winterwander.

The Winter Wander is supported by Port Metro Vancouver.

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For media inquiries contact:
Amanda McCuaig
Marketing Officer, Museum of Vancouver
604-730-5309
amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

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