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Posted by: Angela Yen on November 24, 2016 at 11:58 am

Vancouver in the Seventies: Photos from a Decade that Changed the City is now on view at the Museum of Vancouver.

The exhibition displays over 400 photos from The Vancouver Sun collection. To get a closer look and to celebrate some of these stunning photographs, each Friday we'll be selecting our Five Favourite Photos from each year of the seventies. 


1) The grass, water, city and sky stack up so perfectly on top of each other - the idyllic playground. There's also great energy in just the flow of the girl's hair. 


August 2, 1976 - Mary Mitchell, 7, of Vancouver rides a big rubber ball overlooking the West End. Photo by Bill Keay (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 76-2753)

 

2) The way the curtains mirror the the bars of the patio creates an interesting monochromatic pattern. The endless windows with closed curtains in direct contrast to the exposed woman suntanning, implies a clever self awareness on the photo's voyeurism.

April 10, 1976 - High-rise suntanning on the seventh floor of a West 11th Avenue apartment building. Photo by Ralph Bower (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 76-1203)

 

3) Quintessential 1970s childhood. It's wonderful how everything in this photo may have been deemed "nerdy" at the time but now contains essentially everything people think is cool.


October 9, 1976 - Heng Look, twelve, Lev Delang, nine, and Nicholas Delang, ten, check out the goods at a comic book club at the Britannia branch of the Vancouver Public Library. Photo by Ralph Bower (The Vancouver Sun 76-3385)

 

4) A list of favourite photos from the seventies would not be complete without some representation of disco. This fun shot from Annabelle's nicely sums up the jive boogie era.


October 30, 1976 - People dance to disco music at Annabelle’s. Photo by Glenn Baglo (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 76-3622)

5) The photo is strikingly composed with the words on the window acting like a headline/caption and the young man's face and hand, centred and in focus. In many ways it seems posed but the young man's expression appears candid and quite hard to read.  

January 3, 1976 - Alnoor Vergee wipes away the steam at his father’s dry cleaning shop on Davie Street in the West End. Photo by Glenn Baglo (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 76-0009)

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Posted by: Angela Yen on November 21, 2016 at 5:07 pm


On November 17, 2016 the Museum of Vancouver invited another All Together Now contributor to stop by and discuss their passions and what they collect. Rob Frith, owner of Neptoon Records and a collector of hundreds of rare gig concert posters, expanded the focus of the talk to the era of music he loves - the 1960s and1970s.

Joining Frith was local music icon, Howie Vickers of the psychedlic group The Collectors. Together they chatted about Vickers's start in the music industry and what the music scene was like in Vancouver during the heyday of the psychedelic era. 


The discussion extended to the audience who shared their own memories and asked detailed questions about Vickers's first hand experience of "making it" in the industry. The audience included interviewer and music enthusiast, Nardwuar who was eager to ask a few questions himself including what it was like to open for eclectic singer/songwriter Tiny Tim (see video below). 

Thank you to Frith for conducting a fascinating and personal look at the Vancouver music scene and for giving the audience a taste of what the times felt and looked like with a series of gorgeous concert handbills that are now available for purchase at the MOV Gift Shop.

You can check out more of Frith's collection in the exhibition All Together Now: Vancouver Collectors & Their Worlds, on view until January 8, 2017.

Click HERE for more photos from the event.

 

Posted by: Angela Yen on November 17, 2016 at 2:52 pm

Vancouver in the Seventies: Photos from a Decade that Changed the City is now on view at the Museum of Vancouver.

The exhibition displays over 400 photos from The Vancouver Sun collection. To get a closer look and to celebrate some of these stunning photographs, each Friday we'll be selecting our Five Favourite Photos from each year of the seventies. 


 

1) A great shot showing the development of what is now the iconic city centre in downtown Vancouver.

September 11, 1975 - Aerial view of the new Vancouver courthouse and Robson Square complex. Photo by George Diack (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 75-3297)

 

2) I love how the photographer finds a new percepective in representing an otherwise ordinary shot.

March 24, 1975  -  Couple walk past the skylight at the Sedgewick Library at U.B.C. Photo by Deni Eagland (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 75-1230)

 

3) Perfect horizontal lines with a distinct foreground and background. The man is in the prime spot. Yet despite its immpecable composition there is something haunting and surreal about it.

October 14, 1975 - Man walking in Burlington-Northern freight yard with the misty city in the background. Photo by Ian Lindsay (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 75-3724)

 

 4)  A gorgeous shot of Grouse Mountain with impressive lighting and contrast.

December 16, 1975 - A picture-perfect night of skiing on Grouse Mountain. Photo by Ian Lindsay (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 75-4528)

 

5) Tina Turner looks strong and stunning in this photo. Her signature legs never looked longer. Also incredibly interested that this show happened at BCIT!

February 8, 1975 - Tina Turner puts on a show with the Ike and Tina Turner Revue at a dance at the B.C. Institute of Technology. Photo by Glenn Baglo (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 75-0459)

 

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Posted by: Angela Yen on November 16, 2016 at 2:54 pm

On November 4th, the Museum of Vancouver hosted 32 designers at 23 stations, as they presented why they design and why they do it in Vancouver.

Watch the video above to learn firsthand why these local innovators do what they do.

A big thanks to our Visionary Partners that helped make the event a huge success: EcoService, Evo Car Share, EasyPark, HCMA Architecture + Design, Total Green Commercial Cleaning & Maintenance Ltd and Passport.

The photos below depict how interesting and engaging this year's event was.

Please view the full photo album here.

 


Velometro Mobility

 


Danielle Gilday, Yew Woodshop

 


Evan Roche, Jimmi

 


Glenis Canete, Hapa Collaborative

 


Ali Kenyon, HCMA
 

 

Posted by: Angela Yen on November 11, 2016 at 11:00 am

Vancouver in the Seventies: Photos from a Decade that Changed the City is now on view at the Museum of Vancouver.

The exhibition displays over 400 photos from The Vancouver Sun collection. To get a closer look and to celebrate some of these stunning photographs, each Friday we'll be selecting our Five Favourite Photos from each year of the seventies. 
 


1) A rainy noir like photo captures the current moods in the city. 


March 8, 1974  - People with umbrellas on a rainy day. Photo by George Diack (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 74-0740)

2) Fun energetic photo. Looks like a still out of a buddy-cop film.

June 19, 1974 - Spanish Banks lifeguards Jim Harris and Glenn Schultz demonstrate an amphibious beach buggy and the art of the walkie-talkies to Bonnie Stefanko and Lois Tomlinson. Photo by  Ralph Bower (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 74-2140)

3) I like how Kits Beach looks pratically the same as it does today. There's even a road bike propped up in the middle of the beach which is such a classic Vancouver symbol.

August 5, 1974 - Kitsilano Beach on a summer day. Photo by Deni Eagland (Courtresy of The Vancouver Sun 74-2782)

4) A slice of life photo that captures the humour in everyday things.

August 19, 1974 -  A Canada Post worker takes a break in the mail relay box on the corner of Beach and Chilco in the West End. Photo by  Rob Straight (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 74-2926)

5) Looks like dating in Vancouver was no fun in the seventies too.

December 5, 1974 - Couple at Harry C’s singles bar. Photo by Glenn Baglo (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 74-4329)

 

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Posted by: Angela Yen on November 9, 2016 at 12:10 pm

The City of Vancouver have annouced that they will install heritage-style lamp posts and suicide prevention fencing on Burrard Bridge starting this week. The construction will begin on the west side of the Burrard Bridge.

The final design of the new bridge fencing was designed in collaboration with a stakeholder group made up of representatives from Heritage Commission, Heritage Foundation, Heritage Society, Active Transportation Policy Council, Urban Design Panel, Vancouver Coastal Health, BC Crisis Centre, the Vancouver Police Department and representatives from the film and television sector. Fencing was recommended by the BC Coroners Service and the BC Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure.

"We applaud the City of Vancouver for adding the barriers," says Vancouver Coastal Health Medical Health Officer Dr. Emily Newhouse. "This new fencing will save lives. The research shows that suicide attempts from bridges are impulsive. Generally, if someone is prevented from jumping off a bridge, they don't try other means of killing themselves."

Several designs were considered, including netting below the bridge, glass fencing, and several fence designs. A picket fence design with strong vertical detail and heritage style pedestrian lamp posts was selected as the final option for several reasons, including:

  • The design respects the heritage elements of the bridge more than other options
  • The simple design of the fence pickets maximizes views for pedestrians, cyclists and vehicle passengers
  • The design is constructible and has lower construction and maintenance costs
Posted by: Angela Yen on October 31, 2016 at 2:36 pm

Vancouver in the Seventies: Photos from a Decade that Changed the City is now on view at the Museum of Vancouver.

The exhibition displays over 400 photos from The Vancouver Sun collection. To get a closer look and to celebrate some of these stunning photographs, each Friday we'll be selecting our Five Favourite Photos from each year of the seventies. 


 

1) Interesting skyline shot to compare to how the city looks today.

 June 26, 1973  - Seaplane and skyline of city at Coal Harbour. Photo by John Denniston (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 73-2344)
 

2) I find this photo inspiring as it shows a young Svend Robinson delving into his passions and supporting the community at an eary age, unbeknownst of the influenitial Canadian political figure he will become.

August 1, 1973 - Svend Robinson, who went on to become a long-time Member of Parliament (1979-2004), working at the Youth Referral Centre for transient youth at 1845 West Georgia Street. Photo by Brian Kent (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 73-2881)

3) Chinatown feels bustling and exciting with the wall of signs and power lines overflowing to the point where the family crossing the street is almost camouflaged into the background.

August 30, 1973 -  A mom and her children cross East Pender Street in Chinatown early in the morning. Photo by John Mahler (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 73-3391)
 

4) The composition really mirrors the mood in the photo and the faces of the reporters says it all. The way they are hovering down on Bill Bennett and pointing their mics directly in his face, further emphasize the discontent and the pressure coming down on him.

November 25?, 1973 - Bill Bennett wins the leadership of the Social Credit Party at the convention. Photo by John Mahler (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 73-4426)
 

5) This photo accompanies a series of fashion shots, however this particular one stands out because on top of the man's cool fashion sense, it feels extremely candid and natural. There is also a nice balance of masculine and feminin with his muscular build and stern look juxtaposed his long flowing hair and big heeled shoes. This image is the cover of the Vancouver in the Seventies book which inspired the exhibition.

August 14, 1973 - Summer street fashion on West Georgia Street with the Devonshire Hotel in background. Photo by Vladimir Keremidschieff  (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 73-3098a)


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Posted by: Angela Yen on October 31, 2016 at 10:17 am

Happy Halloween from the Museum of Vancouver!

Here are Five fun items we've found in the MOV collection!

Paper pumpkin

Date
1945 to 1962

Artefact History

This collection was donated by Mrs. Dorothy Sloan who, along with her husband J. Sloan, owned The Dance Novelty Bureau, located at 570 Granville Street. The store opened in 1931 and closed in 1962, changing management and location occasionally. See Documentation Specific File for more information taken from the Vancouver Directories.
 



Halloween at Retinal Circus handbill 1968

Date

1968

Artifact History

Donor has been called "the meister of Vancouver rock memorabilia." He is the owner of Vancouver's well-known Neptoon Records, which sells music, posters, and in particular, 1960s psychedelia. The Retinal Circus was a club on Davie Street that regularly booked psychedelic, blues, rock and rockabilly bands. Just like in San Francisco, local artists designed posters to announce shows from all kinds of bands of the day, including many of the ones from California and the rest of the USA. This handbill was designed Frank Lewis, an artist from Victoria, B.C. His career took him eastward in the late 1950s where he worked as a professional illustrator. In 1963, his work was placed in the prestigious New York Society of Illustrators Show. He returned to the West Coast in the late 1960s, where he primarily worked on large-scale projects such as murals and corporate commissions. Other well known Vancouver poster artists from this period were Bob Masse, Steven Seymour and Eric Fisher.
 



Martian Halloween costume

Date

1945 to 1962

Artifact History

This collection was donated by Mrs. Dorothy Sloan who, along with her husband J. Sloan, owned The Dance Novelty Bureau, located at 570 Granville Street. The store opened in 1931 and closed in 1962, changing management and location occasionally. See Documentation Specific File for more information taken from the Vancouver Directories.
 



Halloween party invitation c. 1930

Dates/Period
c.1930

Artifact History

removed from Harper residence at 2950 West 8th ave Vancouver.
 



Poster: The Noise of Kitsilano

Dates/Period
1970s (?), 1980s (?)

Artifact History

This flyer was kept by Ray and Patsy Chouinard.

Cool Aid was created by young people, including Ray Chouinard, to offer assistance to young people without "laying any heavy trips on them". It began by offering emergency housing, counselling and assistance during bad drug experiences. At this time, the 4th Avenue area was thronged with young adults who had left home and drifted towards the alternative scene in Vancouver. Patsy studied art in Saskatchewan until 1970, when she was recruited by the Cool Aid to come to Vancouver and establish a pottery factory as an employment project for "transient youth". She supervised the installation of a huge kiln at the Cool Aid Craft Factory, which was established in Yaletown with an L.I.P. grant. Patsy moved in to Cool Aid's main house on West 7th, near Arbutus. The Cool Aid house ran a daily "feed in". This required such huge quantities of rice, beans and vegetables that Patsy finally organized the EAT ME Food Co-op. Anyone could become a member and by collectively buying in bulk, they managed to reduce prices and created access to foods that were unavailable in regular supermarkets. In addition, Cool Aid ran a farm, "Little Switzerland", in the mountains behind Chilliwack.

Posted by: Angela Yen on October 27, 2016 at 3:55 pm

What do you design?
ChopValue™ designs high performance home decor products - entirely made of recycled bamboo chopsticks. We create composite materials with a wooden texture ending up as tiles for walls and flooring, coasters and small objects as well as shelving - even table tops. 

Why do you design?
We design because we are builders, young designers, product developers and carpenters by heart with the motivation to add value to under-utilized urban waste resources. With our background in working with wood and bamboo for new materials we founded ChopValue to tell the story on how to redefine waste as new resources for a second life. 

Why do you do this in Vancouver?
Vancouver is not only one of the most livable cities in the world but also home for its popular Asian cuisine. Being as a society very perceptive to recycling with initiatives like Zero Waste or Circular Economy, ChopValue started its collection campaign for chopsticks with local restaurants in Vancouver neighbourhoods to set an example of how to involve businesses, communities and households in designing new products out of a material that any Vancouverite can identify with.  

Meet Felix and get a closer look at this products at Why I Design: Friday, November 4.

Posted by: Angela Yen on October 27, 2016 at 3:12 pm

Vancouver in the Seventies: Photos from a Decade that Changed the City is now on view at the Museum of Vancouver.

The exhibition displays over 400 photos from The Vancouver Sun collection. To get a closer look and to celebrate some of these stunning photographs, each Friday we'll be selecting our Five Favourite Photos from each year of the seventies. 


1) My favourite from the entire collection. It captures a group of people who are individual and closed off from each other and striking their different poses, but at the same time there's a sameness and mundanity in their actions that pegs them as part of the same. It captures a visual of everday life that didn't seem extraordinary at the time (people making phone calls at a phone booth) but in the present is special and a kind of historic evidence, because it's a visual that would simply not exist today due to the changes in technology. The composition is also great with its strong horizontal lines, the fashionable young man facing head on and slightly off centre. Each person is wonderfully framed by the walls of the booth that if you were to zoom in on each booth you'd have another great image. This photo has a lot going for it.


February 15, 1972 - Pay phones at the Vancouver International Airport. Photo by Glenn Baglo (Courtesty of The Vancouver Sun 72-0514)

2) This one is a favourite for its display of typical male fashion at the time (denim jacket, thick mustache, cowichan sweater) and how they look like they could be two regular guys hanging out today in East Van. 


May 3, 1972 - Photographers Rod Gillingham (left) and Curt Lang, who received a Local Initiatives grant. Photo by Deni Eagland (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 72-14383)

3) Pure joy and fanatstic energy in this photo. When you read the school was demolished later that year it puts that emotion in check.


May 11, 1972 - Students at Sir William Dawson elementary school in the West End. The 1913 school was demolished at the end of the school year. Photo by Peter Hulbert (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 72-1526)

4) The image is multicultural without it being political or the focus of the photo. It's just two kids hanging out by Coal Harbour and one of them has awesome pants.


October 7, 1972 - Brad Kilburn and Willy Ivory take in the view of Coal Harbour from Stanley Park. Photo by Glenn Baglo (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 72-3309)

5) The area around Main and Cordova obviously looks very different now than it did in 1972 which is why this photo is interesting - to a modern Vancouverite, the odd thing about it isn't the pile of garbage but that the rest of the street is immaculate, shiny and bright.


May 5, 1972 - A municipal workers’ strike results in piles of trash in the Main and Cordova area. Photo by George Diack (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 72-1519)

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