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Posted by: Anonymous on September 13, 2016 at 4:05 pm

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

September 13, 2016

 

Museum of Vancouver zooms in on key moments from the city’s coming of age with a new exhibition:
Vancouver in the Seventies

 

Photos from the Vancouver Sun's collection focus on the decade that changed the city.

 

VANCOUVER, BC – The Museum of Vancouver (MOV) is pleased to present a fascinating new exhibition about an era of political upheaval, economic prosperity, and cultural blossoming. Vancouver in the Seventies: Photos from a Decade that Changed the City – on view at MOV from October 13, 2016 through February 26, 2017 – features 400 images from the Vancouver Sun newspaper collection, as well as a number of 1970s artefacts from the Museum’s collection.

MOV Senior Curator Viviane Gosselin describes the photos asstunning images of an intense period of self-discovery and growing up for Vancouver. They capture the beauty of everyday events and chronicle the drama of pivotal moments that continue to shape the city.”

The images are organized around themes of protesting, building, performing, and playing in Vancouver. Visitors are invited to add their significant 1970s Vancouver happenings to a visual timeline of events and factoids.

Vancouver in the Seventies builds on the book of the same name – authored by retired Vancouver Sun research librarian Kate Bird with an introduction by columnist Shelley Fralic – publishing October 15, 2016 by Greystone Books. The exhibition will be designed by 10four Design Group, with curation by Viviane Gosselin and guest curator Kate Bird.

“This collection of Vancouver Sun photographs reveals not just the character of the city in the 1970s but how Vancouver became what it is today,” says Bird.

To encourage Vancouverites to think about the future of their city, the Museum of Vancouver will invite people to come together to reflect on the 1970s through the lenses of activism, arts, and business. Public programs will include an event where news photographers and journalists will share their perspectives and invite debates on the evolving field of photojournalism.

  The Museum of Vancouver is grateful for the support of the Vancouver Sun.

 

About Museum of Vancouver (museumofvancouver.ca)

The Museum of Vancouver’s mission is to inspire a deeper understanding of Vancouver through stories, objects and shared experiences. The museum’s programs, exhibitions, and collections bring people together and inspire conversation about the future. The museum, an enthusiastic civic advocate, is an independent non-profit organization dedicated to inspiring a socially connected, civically engaged city.

 

LISTING INFORMATION

Vancouver in the Seventies: Photos from the Decade that Changed the City           

Guest curator: Kate Bird

MOV curator: Viviane Gosseiln

Design: 10four Design Group

Date: October 13, 2016 – February 26, 2017

Venue: Museum of Vancouver: 1100 Chestnut Street, Vancouver, BC

Website: museumofvancouver.ca

 

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For further media information, contact Myles Constable: 604-730-5309 | mconstable@museumofvancouver.ca

Images for press use can be downloaded here: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/pbo7i8kxt6hwlkh/AACLJ_crtSUJoRdYGeWAAOULa?dl=0

 

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Posted by: Marketing on June 6, 2016 at 11:40 am

Interactive display shines spotlight on fascinating local collectors and treasures that help us understand our history and community

 

VANCOUVER, BC – The Museum of Vancouver (MOV) is pleased to present an intriguing exhibition about the significance of collecting. All Together Now: Vancouver Collectors and Their Worlds – on view at MOV from June 23, 2016 to January 8, 2017 – features wall-to-wall displays of rare, unconventional, and awe-inspiring objects from 20 diverse Vancouver collectors.

“The act of collecting is a fascinating way to engage with one’s identity, history, and community,” explained Viviane Gosselin, Curator of Contemporary Culture at MOV. “This exhibition enables visitors to enter into the rich, often-unknown worlds of collectors, and to think about how private collections can affect our understanding of the past. In this way, it reminds us of the importance of collectors as memory keepers.”

Taking inspiration from the eclectic cabinets of curiosities belonging to 17th century scientists, All Together Now features floor-to-ceiling displays, portraits of each collector, and numerous tactile experiences for visitors. These interactive components include playing pinball machines, trying on corsets, listening to long-forgotten bands, and handling historical artifacts.

This captivating sensory experience not only showcases intriguing items, but the stories of their remarkable collectors: Angus Bungay started collecting action figures when he worked in the animation industry; Imogene Lim, an anthropologist, gathers Chinese-Canadian menus because they connect to her family story and her interest in intercultural history; Kyle Seller’s numerous pinball machines are featured in pubs across the city; prosthetist David Moe’s assortment of vintage artificial limbs stems from his father’s profession and offers insight into the rapid development of medical technology; and Melanie Talkington observes the changes in fashion and bodies through the ages with her largest-in-the-world collection of 19th century corsets.

Vancouver-centric collections also feature prominently in All Together Now: Lyanne Smith and Angus McIntyre’s ephemera from public transit documents its history in Greater Vancouver; journalist Willow Yamauchi’s collection of her father’s drag queen costumes also includes materials from his beloved 80s Vancouver band, the Bovines; and Major James Matthews’ hunting compilation forms the core of the MOV and Archives collections, shaping how we understand Vancouver today.

As a way to further engage with the exhibition, the Museum invites people to post pictures of themselves with their collections on social media, using the hashtag #mycollectionatMOV. These images will animate the exhibition space through large projections. MOV will also ask visitors to consider collecting in their own lives through upcycling workshops, collector show and tells, and a symposium on the role of community engagement in museum collecting.

 

About Museum of Vancouver (museumofvancouver.ca)

The Museum of Vancouver connects Vancouverites to each other and connects Vancouver to the world. The museum’s programs, exhibitions, and collections bring people together and inspire conversation about the future. The museum, an enthusiastic civic advocate, is an independent non-profit organization dedicated to inspiring a socially connected, civically engaged city.

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For further media information, contact

Sarah Cruickshank I T. 604.558.2400 ext. 507 I C. 604.802.3712

scruickshank@lauramurraypr.com

 

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Posted by: Marketing on April 29, 2016 at 2:00 pm

VANCOUVER, BC –  On Monday, May 2, the Museum of Vancouver (MOV) will be turning the clock back thirty years, to that monumental day that changed the city forever – the opening of 1986 World Exposition on Transportation and Communication. To mark the occasion, admission to the Museum will reflect 1986 pricing: just $4.00 to learn about the city’s history, future, and check out the new Recollecting Expo 86 display. Cake will be served at 11:00am.

Expo 86 was a game changer. It remains one of the largest public events ever held in British Columbia, and it was a catalyst for major projects in real estate, infrastructure, and architecture. The fair attracted over 22 million visitors and gave Vancouver international stature. The provincial town became a bold city with boundless potential.  

“The creation of Expo 86 was less about planning and design and more about performance art, the orchestrations of beliefs, and the hopes and desires of a local and global community,” said Bruno Freschi, Expo 86 Chief Architect.

Expo 86 had an impact on everyone who took part in it. Vancouverites remember what they did there and who was with them. Many residents held onto their memories by collecting souvenirs.

To mark the 30th anniversary, MOV has put together a mini-exhibition using a fraction of Pete Visscher’s impressive collection of Expo 86 memorabilia, including Expo Ernie, hundreds of pins, signage, and recollections of this impactful event. This display spotlights the important role of collectors as memory keepers. The Museum invites you to share your memories and images of Expo 86 on Twitter and Instagram. Please use the hashtag #RecollectingExpo86.

About Museum of Vancouver (museumofvancouver.ca)
The Museum of Vancouver connects Vancouverites to each other and connects Vancouver to the world. The museum’s programs, exhibitions, and collections bring people together and inspire conversation about the future. The museum, an enthusiastic civic advocate, is an independent non-profit organization dedicated to inspiring a socially connected, civically engaged city.

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Posted by: Marketing on March 10, 2016 at 5:39 pm

ANNOUNCEMENT
 

VANCOUVER, BC –  For two days this week, the Museum of Vancouver (MOV) ran test advertisements on Burke Billboards. The digital advertising company offered the opportunity to increase brand exposure in target locations around False Creek, especially in key areas where tourists could discover the Museum’s proximity in Vanier Park. The tests revealed just how visible the displays are, and that public would certainly take notice.

The Museum has received a few messages expressing displeasure in choosing this new advertising medium. The sentiment is understandable, and MOV appreciates where these perspectives are coming from. The Museum, whose vision includes inspiring civic engagement, is impressed by the passionate reaction of local residents.

As many people in Vancouver are new to the city and unacquainted with MOV, we have a significant challenge in raising awareness that we are located in the white building “with the hat on it” in Vanier Park. Moreover, with a modest marketing budget, MOV is forced to get creative and try new cost-effective methods to get the word out. For the Museum to remain sustainable, it must continue to grow its audience.

The Museum of Vancouver relies on a combination of financial support from donors, government funders, and admissions revenue from visitors to create programming that deepens our understanding of Vancouver.  Our current exhibition Your Future Home focuses, in part, on the use of public space, and encourages the people to suggest ideas for the betterment of the city.

About Museum of Vancouver (museumofvancouver.ca)
The Museum of Vancouver connects Vancouverites to each other and connects Vancouver to the world. The museum’s programs, exhibitions, and collections bring people together and inspire conversation about the future. The museum, an enthusiastic civic advocate, is an independent non-profit organization dedicated to inspiring a socially connected, civically engaged city.

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________________________________________________________________________________

For further media information, contact
Myles Constable, Museum of Vancouver
mconstable@museumofvancouver.ca
604-730-5309
 

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Posted by: Marketing on March 2, 2016 at 3:45 pm

ANNOUNCEMENT
March 2, 2016

The Museum of Vancouver’s Board of Directors announces that CEO Nancy Noble will be leaving MOV at the end of July.

A rigorous and disciplined search for her successor will begin now to ensure a smooth transition.

“It has been an amazing ten years at MOV, and I am very proud of everything we’ve accomplished, creating a great city museum,” says Noble. “However, I am looking forward to new challenges and I hope to continue to push boundaries of what a museum can do.”

Board Chair, Jill Tipping, says, “Nancy’s leadership has had a significant impact on the Museum and the role it plays in the community. Over the past ten years, she led the organization to the creation of a new vision, values, direction and brand. The Museum’s reputation has grown in attendance and has won numerous awards. Noble transformed the Museum into a significant civic institution, reflecting the values and interests of Vancouverites, and making an impact in the city’s cultural realm.

Nancy Noble has taken the Museum of Vancouver on an exciting journey in the last decade and the MOV looks to the future and the opportunity to once again redefine the Museum and its role in Vancouver’s cultural life.  MOV recently unveiled a new five-year strategic plan focusing on its position as a social connector, inspiring civic engagement and improving the institution’s sustainability.

The Board of Directors is both proud and greatly appreciative of Nancy’s exceptional contribution to the Museum of Vancouver and for her leadership and its significant impact on the Museum and the role in plays in the community.

About Museum of Vancouver (museumofvancouver.ca)
The Museum of Vancouver connects Vancouverites to each other and connects Vancouver to the world. The museum’s programs, exhibitions, and collections bring people together and inspire conversation about the future. The museum, an enthusiastic civic advocate, is an independent non-profit organization dedicated to inspiring a socially connected, civically engaged city.

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________________________________________________________________________________

Inquiries about this matter should be directed to
Jill Tipping, Museum of Vancouver Board Chair
jill.tipping@schneider-electric.com
604-671-0001

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For further media information, contact
Myles Constable, Museum of Vancouver
mconstable@museumofvancouver.ca
604-730-5309

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Posted by: Marketing on February 29, 2016 at 10:43 am

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
February 29, 2016

VANCOUVER, BC –  The Museum of Vancouver (MOV) is pleased to announce that Amanda Burrows has joined its team of passionate advocates for the city. As the Director of Development, Burrows will head up the Museum’s fundraising efforts, fostering relationships with donors, sponsors, and the Museum’s membership.

She comes to MOV with more than eight years of experience raising funds for arts organizations. In addition to her experience at the Art Gallery of Ontario and the Guggenheim NYC, Burrows recently served as the Associate Director of Annual Giving for the Vancouver Opera, where she created the Young Patrons Circle that engaged the next generation of arts patrons.

Burrows was the ideal candidate for this position after studying Fundraising Management at Ryerson University, and having earned a Master’s Degree in Museum Studies at the University of Toronto.

As a connector, Burrows has developed programs that stimulate philanthropic behaviour. She sits on the Boards for Contemporary Art Gallery, and Passion Foundation, that encourage using arts for community involvement, civic engagement and social change.

 “I am thrilled to join the MOV team as it moves forward,” Burrows announced. “Several years ago, the Museum’s provocative programming helped to put them on my radar, and I am extremely excited to apply my experience as a fundraiser, museum practitioner, and Vancouverite to such an innovative and inclusive institution.”

“Amanda has wholeheartedly embraced MOV’s new vision to inspire a social connected, civically engaged city,” explained MOV CEO Nancy Noble.

Burrows is excited to explore new linkages in the local community, and get more Vancouverites involved with their Museum.

You can reach Amanda Burrows at:

 
 

About Museum of Vancouver (museumofvancouver.ca)

The Museum of Vancouver connects Vancouverites to each other and connects Vancouver to the world. The museum’s programs, exhibitions, and collections bring people together and inspire conversation about the future. The museum, an enthusiastic civic advocate, is an independent non-profit organization dedicated to inspiring a socially connected, civically engaged city.

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For further media information, contact

Myles Constable, Museum of Vancouver

mconstable@museumofvancouver.ca

604-730-5309

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Posted by: Marketing on February 16, 2016 at 4:06 pm

VANCOUVER, BC - From Canada’s centennial and leading up to its sesquicentennial, the Museum of Vancouver continues to play a vital role in preserving history, and inspiring dialogue about our future. As part of Canada’s Road to 2017, MOV is partnering with Instagram to host #EmptyMuseumofVan on February 17, an exclusive event for Vancouver Instagrammers to experience and capture the wonder of their city museum, and the new Your Future Home exhibition, before its doors open to the public.

The Museum of Vancouver joins other major institutions around the world that have hosted similar events, including #EmptyLouvre in Paris and #EmptyGuggenheim in New York. Instagram is working with landmark institutions across Canada like the Museum of Vancouver, a centennial building, to host #empty events in the lead up to Canada's 150th in 2017. The goal is to bring people together around photography and celebrate the beauty of Canada through the lens of the arts, culture and digital media. The result: a special exhibit that will feature photographs showcasing leading Canadian cultural institutions through the eyes of Canadians (and their Instagram filters).

What:     Instagram photography event #EmptyMuseumofVan #Roadto2017

Who:    Heather Deal, Deputy Mayor, City of Vancouver
Lilly Wyden, Manager of Public Policy, Instagram
Nancy Noble, CEO, Museum of Vancouver
Vancouver-based Instagrammers

When:     Wednesday, February 17, 2016
8:30 a.m.    Registration
8:40 a.m.    Remarks
8:50 a.m.    Self-guided tour and opportunities for photographs

Where:    Museum of Vancouver, 1100 Chestnut Street, Vancouver (in Vanier Park)

About Museum of Vancouver
The Museum of Vancouver connects Vancouverites to each other and connects Vancouver to the world. The museum’s programs, exhibitions, and collections bring people together and inspire conversation about the future. The museum, an enthusiastic civic advocate, is an independent non-profit organization dedicated to inspiring a socially connected, civically engaged city.

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________________________________________________________________________________

For further media information, contact
Myles Constable, Museum of Vancouver
mconstable@museumofvancouver.ca
604-730-5309
 

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Posted by: Marketing on December 15, 2015 at 9:56 am

 

Co-presenters Museum of Vancouver and Vancouver Urbanarium explore challenges and solutions relating to citizens’ greatest concerns

 

Vancouver, BC – From the Museum of Vancouver (MOV), in partnership with the Vancouver Urbanarium Society, comes a provocative and timely exploration of the future of Vancouver. In response to mounting concern about a rapidly changing region, Your Future Home: Creating the New Vancouver, on display at MOV from January 21 through May 15, 2016, will immerse visitors in an experience that spotlights 20 visions for tomorrow’s city, while focusing on four topical issues: housing affordability, residential density, ease of transportation, and quality of public space.

“Vancouver is a city in flux, undergoing massive growth and redevelopment. With as many as three homes demolished each day, often to make room for denser living, we are experiencing a watershed moment in the history of the region,” says Gregory Dreicer, MOV Director of Curatorial and Engagement. “With everyone already talking about Vancouver’s sky-high housing prices, we want to shift the conversation from real estate to the state of the city. Your Future Home launches from a ‘presentation centre’ into an ‘urban grid,’ in which some of Vancouver’s most creative minds grapple with the city’s thorniest issues. We want to bring more people into debates about what their city might become.”

More than 20 of Vancouver’s leading architects, urban planners, and visionaries will create multimedia scenarios that ask visitors to stop and rethink what they want in their hometown. These scenarios will include a model for a 2,500-foot vertical city that will have visitors challenging customary notions of scale; a strategy for a post-disaster transportation network that caters to bicycles; and a proposal for a network of floating barge parks.

Your Future Home will also contain a fascinating series of case studies that will highlight the role that individuals and communities play in building Vancouver. Stories will speak to the Arbutus Lands redevelopment, upcoming decisions that may transform places like Granville Island, and changes to how we heat buildings downtown.

Visitors of all ages will discover astonishing facts about the unceasing change that has resulted in today’s Vancouver—a city with fewer native residents than any other in North America. Your Future Home will feature a mock 1,400-square-foot ‘sales centre,’ including infographics, animations, dramatic models, panoramic images relating to the downtown core—and the until-now suburban neighbourhoods that make up 95 per cent of the city. People will be encouraged to discuss the exhibition’s future scenarios, give feedback, and propose their own ideas.

Throughout the duration of the exhibition, Vancouverites will be invited to participate in a number of complementary activities, including walking tours, discussions, social events with drinks, and workshops developed to spark conversation about the environments in which we live. A series of hard-hitting debates will focus on public transportation, taxation of vacant properties, affordable housing solutions, and more.

The Vancouver Urbanarium Society and Museum of Vancouver are grateful for the support of Rositch Hemphill Architects, Marcon Investments Ltd., Wesgroup Properties LP, Macdonald Development Corporation, Glotman Simpson, Richard Henriquez, Henriquez Partners Architects, Rethink, Adera Development Corporation, BTY Consulting Group, Brooks Pooni Associates, PFS Studio, Bruce Haden, Andrew Gruft, Leslie Van Duzer, and Marta Farevaag. Additionally, the Museum would like to thank its institutional funders: City of Vancouver, Province of British Columbia, and BC Arts Council, and the exhibition media sponsor: CBC Vancouver.

About: Museum of Vancouver (museumofvancouver.ca)

The Museum of Vancouver connects Vancouverites to each other and connects Vancouver to the world. The museum’s programs, exhibitions, and collections bring people together and inspire conversation about the future. The museum, an enthusiastic civic advocate, is an inde­pendent non-profit organization dedicated to inspiring a socially connected, civically engaged city.

About: Vancouver Urbanarium Society (urbanarium.org)
Urbanarium was founded by a group of prominent Vancouver urbanites, including architects, planners and leading citizens who are passionate about citybuilding. Urbanarium believes in engaging and informing the citizens of Metro Vancouver, in order to help guide decision-making and protect the region’s future well-being. Urbanarium intends to become a respected platform for urban conversation and a place where people can get balanced, unbiased information.

 

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For further media information, contact

Sarah Cruickshank | T: 604.558.2400 ext. 507 | C: 604.802.3712 

scruickshank@lauramurraypr.com

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Posted by: Marketing on October 16, 2015 at 4:36 pm

c̓əsnaʔəm, The City Before the City shares Musqueam history and culture

VANCOUVER, BC – A unique collaboration amongst three Vancouver cultural institutions has been named winner of the 2015 Governor General’s History Award for Excellence in Museums. Gold medals were presented Friday at Rideau Hall by His Excellency the Right Honourable David Johnston, Governor General of Canada.

The award recognizes individuals or institutions that have made remarkable contributions to a better knowledge of Canadian history. This year’s winning project is c̓əsnaʔəm, The City Before the City. The exhibition tells the story of c̓əsnaʔəm, one of the largest ancient Musqueam villages and burial sites upon which Vancouver was built. It was jointly curated by the Museum of Vancouver (MOV) in collaboration with the Museum of Anthropology (MOA) at UBC, Musqueam First Nation, and Susan Roy from the University of Waterloo.

“Winning such a prestigious national award is a testament to the hard work, creativity and perseverance of the curatorial teams,” says Nancy Noble, CEO of MOV. “This important exhibition has allowed the Museum to confront its own colonial past, acknowledging the actions of our predecessors and hopefully, in some small way, reconciling the many misconceptions about the Musqueam people, their history and their continued contributions to Vancouver and Canadian society.”

The three-location exhibition intends to generate public discussion about indigenous history, and to raise awareness of the significance of c̓əsnaʔəm for the Musqueam people and for Vancouver. The ancient village of c̓əsnaʔəm was founded about 5,000 years ago at what was then the mouth of the Fraser—the southern border of today’s Marpole neighbourhood.

“c̓əsnaʔəm was a place where families lived and put their people to rest and was a sophisticated society. That’s why the exhibit is called ‘The City Before the City,’ says Jordan Wilson of the MOA and co-curator of the exhibition. “All too often there’s a picture painted of these villages as quite small and primitive, but in fact it was quite a large site, and the Musqueam people played a significant role in shaping the City of Vancouver.”

“Museums are no longer just passive buildings that store old objects. They play an active role in sharing new knowledge,” says Janet Walker, President and CEO of Canada’s History Society, which administers the award. “c̓əsnaʔəm, The City Before the City is a perfect example of how a museum exhibition can counter an existing narrative—that Vancouver is a young city of immigrants—and replace it with a more truthful version of events. In this way, museums help shape our future as well as our past.”

The joint exhibition opened earlier this year at the Museum of Vancouver, the Museum of Anthropology and the Musqueam Cultural Centre, and continues through January 2016. Each location explores different aspects of c̓əsnaʔəm, through artifacts—collected mainly in the 1920s and ‘30s—and new technologies such as 3-D printing.

You can find more information about the exhibition at www.thecitybeforethecity.com.

About the Governor General’s History Award for Excellence in Museums
The Governor General’s Award for Excellence in Museums: History Alive! is a partnership between the Canadian Museums Association and Canada’s History Society. First presented in 2011, it honours significant achievement in the historical field and encourages standards of excellence specifically in the presentation, preservation and interpretation of national, regional or local history.

About Canada’s History
Canada’s History is a national charitable organization whose mission is to promote greater popular interest in Canadian history, principally through its publishing, education, and recognition programs. In addition to administering the Governor General’s History Awards and publishing Canada’s History magazine (formerly The Beaver) and Kayak: Canada’s History Magazine for Kids, Canada’s History produces a number of educational and online programs to encourage a Canada where people are deeply engaged in connecting with their shared past.

About Museum of Vancouver
The Museum of Vancouver (MOV) is an award-winning authority on Vancouver’s history, sharing the region’s stories from its Aboriginal beginnings to contemporary topics. It creates engaging exhibitions and programs that encourage dialogue about what was, is, and can be Vancouver, serving as a gathering place that connects Vancouverites to each other, and Vancouver to the world.  

About MOA
The Museum of Anthropology (MOA) at the University of British Columbia (UBC) is world-renowned for its collections, research, teaching, public programs, and community connections.  Founded in 1949 in the basement of the Main Library at UBC, its mission is to inspire understanding of and respect for world arts and cultures. Today, Canada's largest teaching museum is located in a spectacular building overlooking mountains and sea. MOA houses more than 42,000 ethnographic objects and 535,000 archaeological objects, including many which originate from the Northwest Coast of British Columbia. The Koerner Gallery features one of Canada’s most important European ceramics collections, while MOA's recently opened Multiversity Galleries provide public access to more than 10,000 objects from around the world.

About Musqueam First Nation
Musqueam First Nation are traditional hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ speaking people whose territory, and dozens of villages, encompasses much of what is now the Greater Vancouver Regional District. Extensive networks of trade and relations radiate up and down the coast and into the interior. Although a metropolitan city has developed in the heart of Musqueam territory, the community maintains strong cultural and traditional beliefs and these networks. Families teach and pass on this traditional knowledge and history to their people, to keep culture and traditions strong. Musqueam people continue to thrive and evolve, with a population of over 1,200 people; relying on the guiding principles of knowing who they are and where they come from and the responsibilities they share. Nearly half of Musqueam lives on a very small portion of their traditional territory, known as the Musqueam Indian Reserve #2, located south of Marine Drive near the mouth of the Fraser River.

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For further media information, contact
Myles Constable, Marketing Officer, Museum of Vancouver
604.730.5309 | mconstable@museumofvancouver.ca
 

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Posted by: Marketing on September 15, 2015 at 12:13 pm

 

Architectural history of Canada’s newest territory presented at Museum of Vancouver

VANCOUVER, BC – From the Museum of Vancouver (MOV) comes the Vancouver premiere of Arctic Adaptations: Nunavut at 15, commemorating the establishment of Canada’s newest, largest and most northerly territory. This investigation into the architectural history of Nunavut is on display October 8 – December 13, 2015.

 

The exhibition, which is organized and curated by Lateral Office, was originally shown in 2014 at the 14th International Architecture Exhibition - la Biennale di Venezia. It is presented and coordinated by the Winnipeg Art Gallery with assistance from the Museums Assistance Program, department of Canadian Heritage, and presenting sponsor Manulife.

 

Visitors will delve into the realities of contemporary life in this sublime yet fragile region, exploring philosophies of adaptation, ingenuity, and the intersection of technology and tradition. Concepts will be illuminated through soapstone carvings of significant architectural works, topographic models and photographs of Nunavut’s 25 communities, and replicas of structures enhanced by animations which suggest innovative solutions in the delivery of housing, health, arts, education, and recreation.

 

Arctic Adaptations surveys a recent architectural past, a current urbanizing present, and a projected near future of adaptive architecture in Nunavut. Today, there are almost 33,000 people living across two million square kilometres, making Nunavut one of the least densely populated regions in the world. These communities, located above the tree line and with no roads connecting them, range in population from 120 in the smallest hamlet to 7,000 in Nunavut’s capital city of Iqaluit. The climate, geography, and people of Nunavut, as well as the wider Canadian Arctic, challenge the viability of a universalizing modernity.

 

Following the age of polar exploration in the 20th century, modern architecture encroached on this remote and vast region of Canada in the name of sovereignty, aboriginal affairs management, or trade, among others. Throughout the last 100 years, architecture, infrastructure, and settlements have been the tools for these acts. People have been re-located; trading posts, military infrastructure, and research stations have been built; and small settlements are now emerging as Arctic cities. Some have described this rapid confrontation with modernity as a transition “from igloos to internet” compressed into forty years. This abruptness has revealed powerful traits among its people—adaptation and resilience—qualities which modern architecture has often lacked. Few places exemplify the ability to adapt in the face of modernity better than Nunavut.

 

Coinciding with the 15th anniversary of the establishment of the territory, which changed

Canada’s map, Arctic Adaptations explores modernism’s legacy within the contextual particularities of the North. The exhibition documents architectural history in this remarkable but relatively unknown region of Canada, describes the contemporary realities of life in its communities, and examines a projected role for architecture moving forward. It argues that modern Inuit cultures continue to evolve and merge the traditional and the contemporary in unique and innovative ways, and questions whether architecture, which has largely failed this region—both technically and socially—can be equally innovative and adaptive.

 

Modernity is often fearful of the specificities of place and the premise of ‘the local’. Yet Nunavut seems to resist modernism’s universalizing tendency. This unique exhibition seeks to reveal acts of architectural resistance and identify an unrecognized modern Canadian North.

 

Media are invited to an exclusive curator tour of Arctic Adaptations: Nunavut at 15, with Lola Sheppard, on Wednesday, October 7 at 2:30pm. Phone interviews can also be arranged in advance.

 

Credits

Arctic Adaptations: Nunavut at 15 has been organized and curated by Lateral Office, with the support of the Royal Architectural institute of Canada and the Canada Council for the Arts.  It is presented and coordinated by the Winnipeg Art Gallery with assistance for the Museums Assistance Program, department of Canadian Heritage, and presenting sponsor Manulife.

 

About Museum of Vancouver (museumofvancouver.ca)

The Museum of Vancouver (MOV) is an award-winning authority on Vancouver’s history, sharing the region’s stories from its Aboriginal beginnings to contemporary topics. It creates engaging exhibitions and programs that encourage dialogue about what was, is, and can-be Vancouver, serving as a gathering place that connects Vancouverites to each other, and Vancouver to the world.  

 

LISTING INFORMATION                Arctic Adaptations: Nunavut at 15

Date:                                                 October 8 – December 13, 2015

Venue:                                              Museum of Vancouver, 1100 Chestnut Street, Vancouver, BC

Website:                                          museumofvancouver.ca

Images:                                              High-resolution images are available to download at: arcticadaptations.ca/press

 

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For further media information, contact

Myles Constable, Marketing Officer, Museum of Vancouver

604.730.5309 | mconstable@museumofvancouver.ca

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