Programs

Blog

Posted by: Angela Yen on September 26, 2016 at 4:07 pm


Ivan Sayers with Marg Vandenberg (Interim CEO) and Gregory Dreicer (Director of Curatorial and Engagement). The certificate reads: “In recognition of your extensive contributions to the Museum and dedication to the preservation of fashion and city history. You are one of our greatest storytellers.”
 


 

The Museum of Vancouver would like to congratulate our long-time friend, partner and contributor, Ivan Sayers. Today we presented him with the distinction of Curator Emeritus.

Ivan Sayers was born in Cornwall, Ontario, and moved to British Columbia at the age of two. He graduated in 1969 from the University of British Columbia with a degree in Classical Studies and in 1970 began his museum career as a volunteer at the Vancouver Museum (before the name was changed). He was Curator of History at the Museum from 1976 to 1990 and in 1991 he left to become a consultant and lecturer. For over 40 years, Sayers has been producing lectures, exhibitions, and fashion shows on clothing and social history for museums and organizations across western Canada and the western United States.

Sayers has collected costume since he was a teenager and now has one of the finest privately owned collections of period clothing in Canada, with garments and accessories dating from c.1690 to the present. He regularly lectures at local universities and colleges in the Vancouver area, and is the Honourary Curator of the Society for the Museum of Original Costume. Sayers has received awards from the Western Canadian Designers and Fashion Association and the Vancouver Historical Society.

Sayers has been a pivotal guest curator at the Museum of Vancouver, creating popular past exhibitions such as Art Deco Chic: Extravagant glamour between the wars, From Rationing to Ravishing: The Transformation of Women’s Clothing in the 1940s and 1950s, and numerous presentations. He is a charismatic orator, with an irreplaceable bank of knowledge and stories about the history of clothes. We are proud and honoured that Ivan Sayers is the Museum of Vancouver’s Curator Emeritus. We look forward to continuing to work together.

Posted by: Angela Yen on September 26, 2016 at 10:50 am


Photo by Rebecca Blissett

The Museum of Vancouver is thrilled that Imogene Lim is sharing her collection of Chinese restaurant menus and her fascinating insight into Chinatown’s historic restaurants like WK Gardens and the original Sai Woo Chop Suey. Her collection of Chinese menus - which she inherited from her uncle and father - represent more than just nostalgia. As she highlighted in her recent presentation at the Museum, menus hold a tangible trace into the evolution of Chinese cuisine in North America.

Lim, who is a professor of Anthropology and Global Studies at Vancouver Island University is interested in the way food is represented and how that representation may change over time. She pays attention to the language, imagery and iconography used in the menus she collects. Lim is a real foodie and explained in her presentation that her menu collecting goes hand-in-hand with the actual dining experience. Her collecting has often inspired conversations on what is considered authentic Chinese cuisine and where in the city has the best dishes.

Lim’s extensive Chinese menu collection is now on view as part of the exhibition, All Together Now: Vancouver Collectors & Their Worlds.

Tags
Posted by: Angela Yen on September 21, 2016 at 4:03 pm


Photo by Rebecca Blissett

If you summoned all the pinball wizards in Canada, you’d definitely cross paths with Kyle Seller of East Van Amusements. Currently, his collection of vintage pinball machines and arcade games  - which include Funhouse (1988), Cyclone (1988) and Jack-Bot (1995) - are on display at the Museum of Vancouver. And they’re not just there for looking at. You can play them too!

Kyle Seller has about 60 machines in total and has been collecting and building his business since he was a teenager. He bought his first machine when he was 16. What started as a fun social activity to release stress, has become a successful business that allows Seller to share his passion with Vancouverites. He restores pinball machines and rents out pop-up arcades throughout the city.

Seller’s love for pinball comes from all angles. He finds the skill-based game more challenging and unpredictable (than video games) but also admires the craft, art and music that goes hand-in-hand with pinball. “The games I like best are from the mid to late ‘80s and use hand-drawn art… it cannot be matched today,” Seller says.

To celebrate these beloved games, MOV will be hosting pinball events on October 6 and 13.  On the 6th, Seller - along with international pinball tournament champion Robert Gagno - will be participating in an enticing Q&A session, Between the Bumpers, moderated by Tommy Floyd. On the 13th the public can get their game on with our happy hour event and pinball tournament, TILT! Public Pinball Tournament  hosted by Seller himself.

 

Posted by: Angela Yen on September 15, 2016 at 4:55 pm

The Museum of Vancouver (MOV) recently hosted an informative talk about food and its importance to Vancouver’s culture, history and environmental future.


Photo by Rebecca Blissett

 

The speakers included Imogene Lim, an anthropology and global studies professor at Vancouver Island University, and Harold Steves, a local farmer, argoecologist, and climate activist. Both are passionate collectors and contributors to the All Together Now exhibition which feature Lim’s extensive collection of Chinese take-out menus and Steves’ heirloom vegetable seeds, among 18 others.

Harold Steves comes from a line of farmers and seed savers. His great uncle and grandfather established the first seed company in Western Canada. He works out of his family farm in Richmond, raising non GMO heirloom seeds and grass fed beef. Steves explained the pivotal moment in BC’s agricultural history which influenced him and his wife to start saving local seeds. In 1985, the local seed retailer Buckerfields shut down. Seeds offered in their catalogue were slowly being replaced with varieties from California and Mexico – replacing what was once local. Steves was concerned about the loss of genetic diversity and being able to grow seed varieties in BC’s specific climate. So he started saving these seeds, which he now sells.

Steves went on to share some of the vegetables and plants he grows including the Yellow mangel (essentially a big beet that can grow to 10 pounds and has a sweeter taste), alpha tomatoes, Early Amber Sorghum, and Black Russian Sunflowers. He gave a glimpse into some of the growing and seed saving techniques he practices and at the end of the night, he gave out alpha tomato seeds for guests to plant in their own gardens. Thanks Harold!

For more photos from this event please visit: https://www.facebook.com/MuseumofVancouver/photos/?tab=album&album_id=10153716702671433

Follow @Harold_Steves on Twitter.

Posted by: Angela Yen on August 29, 2016 at 1:44 pm


Art Lingren. Photo by Rebecca Blissett

On Tuesday, August 23 the Museum of Vancouver hosted another "Me and My Collection" event. Tuesday's in depth presentation featured fly fishing expert and collector, Art Lingren. Lingren shared his stories and experiences fishing across BC, Alaska, Washington and Oregon. Slides displayed various tackle tying techniques and styles.
 

Lingren's detailed collection of antique tackles are currently on display at MOV as part of the exhibition, All together Now: Vancouver Collector's & Their Worlds. Learn more about Lingren's collection with this exclusive interview:

Q&A with Art Lingren

Why do you collect?
Fly fishing has a rich heritage going back centuries, much of it British. I collect items that connect me with that rich British and British Columbian heritage.

I have become what many consider an authority on B.C. fly fishing history, using the knowledge I’ve gained to write books and articles about B.C. flies, fly tying, fly fishing equipment, fly fishing pioneers and the waters they fished.

How do you collect? 
I select items from sources in the fly fishing community, such as fly shops, antiquarian booksellers, and tackle dealers. Also, I belong to fly fishing clubs and organizations whose members often have items I can acquire through them.

How does your collection relate to you?
I value my fly fishing heritage. Collecting these items connects me to my past and, more specifically, to great B.C. anglers such as General Money, Tommy Brayshaw, and Roderick Haig-Brown; and it gives me a place where I belong. 

How does your collection relate to Vancouver?
Vancouver has been a hub for the fly fishing community for many years. The Totem Fly Fishers, one of two clubs I belong to, is British Columbia’s oldest, founded by Vancouver fly fishers back in the 1960s.

How does collecting you connect with people?
Most of my fishing activities take place through social media, weekly lunch gatherings, monthly meetings, and outings to rivers and lakes with other fly fishers. Through these associations I connect with other collectors.

Posted by: Angela Yen on August 3, 2016 at 12:30 pm


The Bovines

In the coming months the Museum of Vancouver will be highlighting several of the fabulous collectors who are currently part of our exhibition All together Now: Vancouver Collector’s and Their Worlds. Off the cusp of Pride Week, the museum will be throwing a Happy Hour event on Thursday, August 18 featuring Willow Yamauchi and her collection of drag queen dresses that she inherited from her father. He was a member of the drag troupe - The Bovines - who performed across Vancouver and the Lower Mainland during the 1980s. “I never saw my dad perform in drag. I was too young for the clubs. I wanted to understand why he did drag and what it meant to him. Collecting has helped me answer these questions,” Yamauchi explains. Discovering this captivating past led Yamauchi to participate in the important discussion of gender and sexuality.

Don’t miss Undressing Drag where we will continue the discussion with several guest speakers and reminisce and honour the glory days of The Bovines, plus a special drag performance from Peach Cobblah and Isolde N. Barron!


Photo by Rebecca Blissett

Q&A with Willow Yamauchi

Why do you collect?
I inherited my dad’s drag queen costumes when he passed away 10 years ago. I was initially confused by this accidental collection, but eventually I realized it was something rare and special that I needed to preserve. It’s a springboard for fascinating conversations with people who knew him. You can collect things. You can also collect ideas and people. My collection contains all of these.

How does your collection relate to Vancouver?
The Bovines were an important drag group in Vancouver in the 1980s. They raised money for people living with HIV and AIDS and increased awareness at a time when there was little government support. The Bovines were “out,” loud and proud, when it could have been dangerous to identify as LGBTQ.

How does collecting connect you with people?
People who knew my dad share with me their stories, pictures, and films of him. In turn, I am sharing my collection with the city in the hope it might open a larger conversation about sexuality, gender, and artistic expression.

Posted by: Angela Yen on July 14, 2016 at 4:21 pm


Discussion Series Pivotal to a Deeper Understanding of Musqueam Culture

Recently, the Museum of Vancouver has been hosting several events on Musqueam culture, heritage and history in support of our award winning exhibit, c̓əsnaʔəm: The City Before the City. The sharing of knowledge on this ancestral village (previously located in the South Vancouver’s Marpole area) is so pivotal to gaining a deeper understanding of Musqueam culture and the city’s history.

After a canoe building session and tour of the Musqueam Cultural Centre Gallery with Kelly Louis in June, the discussion series returned to MOV. Last week, Wayne Point - a practiced archeologist and craftsman in traditional tool making and Musqueam artifacts - shared with our audience several tools and materials ranging from quartz, carved stone and basalt arrowheads. The talk was followed by a walk through the c̓əsnaʔəm: The City Before the City exhibition. Point elaborated on the intricate histories and details of the many displayed belongings.

This discussion series continues on July 21 when Alec Dan shares his experience taking part in the c̓əsnaʔəm vigil to protect this 4,500 year old village and cemetery from development in 2012 and draw connections between past and present Musqueam culture and heritage. More info HERE.

In September, Larry Grant, Jill Campbell and Vanessa Campbell will present an introduction to Musqueam’s traditional language. More info HERE.

Posted by: Anonymous on June 29, 2016 at 4:07 pm

Check out what the media has to say about our new exhibition:

Vancouver Magazine: Vancouver’s most unconventional collections - a "must-see exhibition."

CBC Our Vancouver: Collector spotlights 40 years of bus tickets, memorabilia in new MOV exhibit

Shaw TV “Around Town”

News1130: 

Vancouver is Awesome: Check out these 20 bizarre collections

Daily Hive: http://dailyhive.com/vancouver/all-together-now-museum-of-vancouver

Vancouver Sunhttp://vancouversun.com/entertainment/local-arts/five-reasons-to-see-museum-of-vancouvers-all-together-now-vancouver-collectors-and-their-worlds

Vancouver Magazine: Vancouver’s most unconventional collections - a "must-see exhibition."

Vancouver Courier: http://www.vancourier.com/entertainment/picks-of-the-week

Georgia Straight: http://www.straight.com/arts/722001/rare-array-vintage-artificial-limbs-joins-museum-vancouver-collectors-show

Westenderhttp://www.westender.com/news-issues/vancouver-shakedown/pinball-chinese-menus-and-road-kill-1.2283054

Sing Tao Vancouver: http://vancouver.singtao.ca/

NUVO Magazine: http://nuvomagazine.com/art/all-together-now-vancouver-collectors-and-their-worlds

Vancouver ObserverThe history of Vancouver's Chinatown, documented in menus

Surrey Leader: A ticket to B.C. transit history

BC Local News: http://www.bclocalnews.com/entertainment/384332941.html

Jewish Independent: http://www.jewishindependent.ca/share-in-collectors-passions/

Eve Lazarus - Blog: http://evelazarus.com/the-collectors/

My Van City: http://myvancity.ca/2016/06/28/together-now-exhibit-mov-showcases-collections-collectors/

Daily Hive: Four local collectors pay homage to retro gaming in Vancouver

Beat Route: Rob Frith captures musical moments in time with concert poster collection in ‘All Together Now’ exhibit

North by Northwest on CBC Radio: Marie Allen talks to Sheryl McKay at 01:16:30 http://ow.ly/Hxd1302mtgV\

All Points West on CBC Radio: History of famous Vancouver Chinatown restaurant WK Gardens revealed through collected menus

Vitamin Daily: All Together Now at the Museum of Vancouver

The Peak (SFU): All Together Now features 20 diverse collections ranging from taxidermy to pinball machines

 

Posted by: Angela Yen on June 27, 2016 at 4:44 pm


Last week, we launched our latest exhibition ALL together NOW, featuring 20 eclectic collections. Everything from prosthetic limbs and pinball machines, to corsets and taxidermy are on display until January 8, 2017. Accompanying each collection, we have incorporated an interactive component to encourage visitors to engage and truly immerse themselves into the collections.


Rob Frith at Neptoon Records. Photo by Rebecca Blissett

One of the collectors included is Neptoon Records owner, Rob Frith. His stunning collection of concert posters offers a glimpse into the past, and an opportunity to discover the legendary artists that played shows in Vancouver. It’s interesting to consider some of the iconic venues that the city has lost, like The Cave Supper Club on Hornby Street or the Embassy Ballroom on Davie Street.


Vancouver band, The Collectors

Along with the posters, a listening station is setup where you can put on a pair of headphones, sit back and listen to some hidden gems which have been tucked away for far too long. Handpicked by Frith himself (from his own personal record collection) the playlist puts a spotlight on local indie artists and past Vancouver groups like sixties psychedelic band The Collectors (what a coincidence!)  It’s how we discovered their hypnotic track “Eyes” which we’ve gleefully featured in our highlight video of the exhibition’s opening night. Check it out below!

According to Wikipedia, The Collectors were originally the house band for CFUN radio during the early 1960s. After a handful of albums and soundtracks to Canadian films, lead singer Howie Vickers left the group in 1969. The remaining members of the band reconstituted themselves as Chilliwack, with Bill Henderson taking over lead vocals.

Posted by: Anonymous on June 27, 2016 at 11:44 am

People like collecting. It's probably is connected back to our ancestors' hunter/gatherer days.

These days, we collect all sorts of of things. For some it's shoes, for others it's figurines. A lot of people have grandmothers who collected spoons or plates, or uncles that collected coins and stamps. There's even someone who collects computer viruses.

While some people are definitely hoarders, the displays that make up the MOV's new exhibition are comprised of "serious" enthusiasts who collect their obsession(s) with intent.

ALL together NOW: Vancouver Collectors & Their Worlds features 20 rare, beautiful and unconventional collections. There's artificial eye balls and prosthetics, corsets and drag queen costumes, pinball machines and juke boxes. These are not your typical collections!

The following images have been shared by visitors of the exhibition, illustrating just the tip of the iceberg in regards to the thousands of objects on display.

 

 

Self explanatory #typewriter #captionless #vancouver #travel

A photo posted by Charmayne Leontowich (@luckycharmayne) on

 

Very hard to choose which photo from the @museumofvan opening tonight. So here is a tiny portion of the toy section.

A photo posted by Georgia Straight (@georgiastraight) on

 

Nostalgia trip. #vancouverisawesome #vancity #mycollectionatmov #dailyhivevan #hellobc

A photo posted by Luigi Conti (@igiconti) on

 

Collection

A photo posted by monarch5 (@monarch5) on

 

This gem is currently on exibition at the Museum of Vancouver!! OMG!! Blast from the past!!

A photo posted by Reuben Bibera (@inocent24) on

Pages

Subscribe to Blog