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Vancouver Artists Present Alongside Works Inspired by the Masters

Vancouver’s locally owned and operated fine art gallery, Chali-Rosso Art Gallery, has partnered with several leading, local artists to create a unique show that will present contemporary art works alongside historical masters for the first time.

The show titled “Reflections: Inspired by the Masters” will feature Vancouver’s top contemporary artists as well as historical masters, such as Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, Salvador Dalí, Joan Miró,
Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, among many others. A select group of leading contemporary artists has been challenged to create works of art that are directly inspired by any of the masterworks in Chali-Rosso's gallery collection, including works by the above Modern Masters. The contemporary art works will be exhibited next to their inspirational works by the Masters.

This project is solely dedicated to explore the connection between artists of the past and artists of the present and aims to illustrate how relevant the art of the Modern Masters continues to be.

“It is important to ask what message art carries for us, here and now, especially about works of art created in a time and place so distant from us. We believe that fine art is not separated, not developed in a vacuum, but instead, it builds a continuum along the lines of artists.” Susanna Strem says, the owner and curator of the gallery.

Featured Masters: Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, Salvador Dalí, Joan Miró, Marc Chagall, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Robert Motherwell, Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, Damien Hirst.

Featured Contemporary Artists: Bill Higginson, Deborah Bakos, Farah Samari, Hale Yin, Judit Haber, Karen Hollowell, Kerry Vaughn Erickson, Lan Lao, Richard Brodeur, Sarah Symes, Stewart Stephenson, Tiarra Edmundson, Tristesse Seeliger and Wendi Copeland.

The exhibition is free for the public and will run for two weeks at the gallery’s downtown location at 549 Howe Street, Vancouver.

EXHIBITION: MARCH 10 - 24, 2017
OPENING RECEPTION: MARCH 10, 7:00 pm - 10:30 pm
ALL DAY OPEN HOUSE: MARCH 11, 10:00 am – 6:00 pm

More info.

The project and exhibition has been endorsed by the Museum of Vancouver.

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Five Favourite Photos - 1970

Vancouver in the Seventies: Photos from a Decade that Changed the City is now on view at the Museum of Vancouver.

The exhibition displays over 400 photos from The Vancouver Sun collection. 

To get a closer look and to celebrate some of these stunning photographs, each Friday we'll be selecting our Five Favourite Photos from each year of the seventies. 

The photos I chose as my Five Favourites are based on whether it captures a moment of historical signifcance in Vancouver, or just an everyday sort of oddness that is unique in its mundanity. 


Protest march against the Vietnam War and the War Measures Act on Granville mall.

October 30, 1970  Glenn Baglo   (Courtesty of The Vancouver Sun 70-3287)

Ten-year-old Steven Miller gets a lift from his twelve-year-old brother Craig at a downtown department store.

January 2, 1970 Dan Scott (Courtesty of The Vancouver Sun 70-0014)


Sun photographer Glenn Baglo’s photo of a woman unable to get into a faith healing meeting at the PNE Agrodome won the rookie photographer a National Newspaper Award.

April 10, 1970  Glenn Baglo (Courtesty of  The Vancouver Sun 70-2235)


Men on park benches at English Bay. 

July 5, 1970  Glenn Baglo (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 70-1244)


Foncie Pulice, a Granville Street fixture for forty-five years before his retirement in 1979, chronicled the changing city, from the fashions to the streetscape, in millions of pictures. *Note the advertisement for the Vancouver Museum & Planetarium behind Foncie Pulice.

August 28, 1970  Deni Eagland (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 70-1931)

Exhibition Sponsor

All Together Now "is a must see exhibition"

Check out what the media has to say about our new exhibition:

Vancouver Magazine: Vancouver’s most unconventional collections - a "must-see exhibition."

CBC Our Vancouver: Collector spotlights 40 years of bus tickets, memorabilia in new MOV exhibit

Shaw TV “Around Town”

News1130: 

Vancouver is Awesome: Check out these 20 bizarre collections

Daily Hive: http://dailyhive.com/vancouver/all-together-now-museum-of-vancouver

Vancouver Sunhttp://vancouversun.com/entertainment/local-arts/five-reasons-to-see-museum-of-vancouvers-all-together-now-vancouver-collectors-and-their-worlds

Vancouver Magazine: Vancouver’s most unconventional collections - a "must-see exhibition."

Vancouver Courier: http://www.vancourier.com/entertainment/picks-of-the-week

Georgia Straight: http://www.straight.com/arts/722001/rare-array-vintage-artificial-limbs-joins-museum-vancouver-collectors-show

Westenderhttp://www.westender.com/news-issues/vancouver-shakedown/pinball-chinese-menus-and-road-kill-1.2283054

Sing Tao Vancouver: http://vancouver.singtao.ca/

NUVO Magazine: http://nuvomagazine.com/art/all-together-now-vancouver-collectors-and-their-worlds

Vancouver ObserverThe history of Vancouver's Chinatown, documented in menus

Surrey Leader: A ticket to B.C. transit history

BC Local News: http://www.bclocalnews.com/entertainment/384332941.html

Jewish Independent: http://www.jewishindependent.ca/share-in-collectors-passions/

Eve Lazarus - Blog: http://evelazarus.com/the-collectors/

My Van City: http://myvancity.ca/2016/06/28/together-now-exhibit-mov-showcases-collections-collectors/

Daily Hive: Four local collectors pay homage to retro gaming in Vancouver

Beat Route: Rob Frith captures musical moments in time with concert poster collection in ‘All Together Now’ exhibit

North by Northwest on CBC Radio: Marie Allen talks to Sheryl McKay at 01:16:30 http://ow.ly/Hxd1302mtgV\

All Points West on CBC Radio: History of famous Vancouver Chinatown restaurant WK Gardens revealed through collected menus

Vitamin Daily: All Together Now at the Museum of Vancouver

The Peak (SFU): All Together Now features 20 diverse collections ranging from taxidermy to pinball machines

 

Sharing Happiness

Myles Constable's picture

Since April 23, more than 30,000 visitors to the Museum of Vancouver have had the exciting and astonishing experience of seeing Stefan Sagmeister: The Happy Show in person (a few people didn't actually like it).

With all those visitors, came crazy numbers of social media posts. Thousands of pictures - of gumballs, yellow walls, a giant monkey, digital spider webs, and people riding the stationary bike with a huge neon sign - have filled the people we follow's feeds.

Check out a sampling of those shots below...

Stefan Sagmeister takes Vancouver by storm

Myles Constable's picture

It's been a rather thrilling time to work at the Museum of Vancouver. Not only have we launched an exhibition about one of the most important stories in Vancouver's history - c̓əsnaʔəm - but then we brought one of the most prolific designers in the world - Stefan Sagmesiter - to launch The Happy Show and give a few presentations.

After overseeing the finishing touches on the exhibition installation, talking to the media, writing on the walls and bathroom stalls, Sagmeister welcomed MOV Members and special guests at our opening reception.

On April 23, Sagmeister with friend (and local designer) Marian Bantjes had a conversation about design. This event was co-presented with the Graphic Designers of Canada, BC Chapter and moderated by Mark Busse. See video below.

Later that day, Sagmeister gave a lecture "On Happiness" which provided additional details behind The Happy Show and insight about his quest to better understand his happiness. Video to come.

Happy days indeed!

Sex Talk in the City: Reflections from a Sexual Health Educator

Guest Author: Catherine Evashuk 

In 1980, my pregnant sixth grade teacher, Mrs. R, decided to explain how babies were made in a straightforward way, and debunk that old myth about storks bringing babies to doorsteps.  After she explained how babies were made, she asked if anyone had any questions.  My hand shot up immediately: “If sex is to make babies, that must mean you’ve had sex twice,right?” (Mrs. R was pregnant with her second child). I remember her turning completely red and murmuring, “Not exactly!” This confused me, since she had just explained that sex was to make babies. If sex was for anything other than that specific goal, why would people have it?

Fast forward to 2013, to the Museum of Vancouver’s ‘Sex Talk in the City’. This amazing and comprehensively conceived exhibition is divided into three parts: ‘The Street’, ‘The Bedroom’ and ‘The Classroom’. As a Sexual Health Educator, ‘The Classroom’ is of course my favourite.  Wandering through ‘The Classroom’ where I can read Sex Ed questions scrawled onto desk, is always a hoot. My favorites include: “If a man gets a boner, what does a woman get?” and “What’s a G Spot and where is it located?”

Things have come a long way since I was a sixth grader in 1980.  Many of the questions students are asking today are about the pleasurable side of sex. These days, sex educators are trained to quite differently, and I must admit, do a much better job than Mrs. R. was able to do when teaching their students the basics of sexual health and reproduction . Still, some students’ eyes widen in disbelief when I explain that when people have sex, most of the time it is not for making a baby! In fact, one of the most common questions I find in the anonymous question box after a lesson is “If sex is to make babies, what’s birth control for?”

I like that so many parts of this exhibition focus on the pleasurable side of sex.  In ‘The Bedroom’ section, there’s a wall displaying vibrators, including some dating back to the late 1800s! I guess it shows that pleasure is always part of the equation, but the way we talk about it, has changed quite a bit.  Of course, the educator in me is also pleased that there is a significant portion of the exhibition - In ‘The Street’ – dedicated to showing and explaining an array of contraception options and condoms, which help people enjoy safer sex.

I wish Mrs. R had explained that sex can feel good and that making babies is only part of it.  Perhaps I should give her a call to invite her to the exhibition so we can check it out together!

*Catherine is a Certified Sexual Health Educator based in Vancouver, and is a volunteer at the Museum of Vancouver.

Welcoming Tobias Home

By Todd Falkowsky, co-curator of Object(ing): The art/design of Tobias Wong

The first time I met Tobias Wong was in New York City in 2004, where we both had shows at the Felissimo House.  As I was setting up my space, a small, very pleasant guy kept circling around and nodding his approval at what we were installing. As we were finishing, he finally came forward and introduced himself as a “big fan”. We chatted about the work and he shared some thoughts. It was only after he left, when I asked the curator who he was, did I find out that it was Tobias. Humble, interested, and filled with ideas. It was a genuine pleasure to meet someone with so much talent introduce himself as a fan when in fact he was a celebrated artist/designer with his star on an explosive rise. Well, the feeling was mutual.

I knew that designers appreciated Tobi’s work, but I realized his influence had run deeper when I was teaching at OCAD in Toronto. I was pleasantly surprised by how many design students wanted to do work like his. They were not looking to be designers in the traditional sense, but to become provocative and use product design as a mirror and comment on the status and purpose of our culture. They did not want to be Starck or Rashid; instead they wanted to be Tobias Wong, the artist who used design to break the rules. Tobi’s ideas and approach had impact on design practice, inviting designers to use their craft to create serious meaning and new ways of interacting with our communities.

Our paths continued to cross over the years and though we were able to work together a handful of times, we always talked about future projects to collaborate on, new shows, products, and publications. That opportunity was not meant to be — a reminder to grab the chances you have and to do the things you really want to do today, rather than tomorrow. I brought Tobias to Toronto in January 2010 for one of his last lectures, and showed his iconic “This is a Lamp” at the accompanying exhibit at the Royal Ontario Museum. This was the last time I talked to him.

Later that spring, upon learning of his passing, I immediately suspected that it was not real; the whole thing seemed surreal and mad, and in line with the shock that Tobi’s work sometimes embraced. I thought it was another irreverent yet more potent stunt, ratcheted up from past projects like his Core77 lecture or the elaborate installation, the Wrong Store in Manhattan. Reality settled in and as heartbreaking a loss it was for the art and design community, I felt his ideas and products would endure, and that his work should continue to be seen, discussed, and celebrated.

I had just moved to Vancouver and it struck me that Tobias’ international success deserved a long overdue homecoming, in the city where he was born and raised (and perhaps where his ideas had their beginning). For me, his work was avant-garde, blending design and art, opening both professions up to new directions; work that is still important and deserves to be promoted and shared.

The Museum of Vancouver has graciously opened their doors to me, and the idea for this show, bringing the work of this remarkable Vancouverite home. Tobi’s family, close friends, colleagues, and fans have opened their hearts to share with us their thoughts and experience to understand and contextualize the work (not to mention lending it to us in the first place). I am honoured to have played a part in bringing this exhibition together. I hope Tobias’ work lives on and continues to inspire, disrupt, and provoke. 

Object(ing) opens to the public September 20, 2012. A limited number of tickets are available to attend the opening night.

XTalk: Great chat with Daphne Spencer from the BC Centre for Disease Control

Viviane Gosselin's picture

I just had an excellent meeting with Daphne Spencer from the Division of STI/HIV Prevention + Control at the BC Centre for Disease Control (CDCofBC). Talked for 2 hours non-stop. She welcomed our idea of having an exhibition zone dedicated to sexual pleasure and giggled when I talked about our research on vintage vibrators! Great potential for collaboration. Amazingly helpful with connecting us with knowledge/community experts. I think she’ll be able to lend us the costume of Captain Condom for the exhibition! She introduced me to the work of Chee Mamuk and educator Sarah Callahan. I’m so impressed with their aboriginal youth video program Youth Have The Power. Super Inspiring. I'm not surprised to see that Hello Cool World is involved!

Join in the conversation on Twitter: @xtalkinthecity #xtalkMOV

XTalk: Some thoughts from Womyn’sWare – a Sex Talk in the City Project Ally

Viviane Gosselin's picture

“Our work has made us keenly aware of society’s fears around sexuality” -Andrea Dobbs, Womyn'sWear

As the retail design and display manager of Womyns’Ware I wear a lot of hats. Sometimes I’m buried under a pile of catalogues trying to select tasteful, safe, quality sex toy amidst a sea of cheap, tacky, or disturbing products. Or I’m trolling industrial design sites in Europe looking for innovative approach to sex toys design. I support customers and staff, collaborate with our founders to design and produce fixtures and displays that support our wares, and I participate in the communication efforts. When all is said and done, I feel I’ve developed the skills of a researcher, an educator, and an artist.

So when Womyns’Ware was asked to participate in the MOV Sex Talk in the City project I was overjoyed! Helping to create a visual and tangible feast for Vancouverites to engage in with the goal of enlightenment at its core is right up our alley. What can we bring to the table? How about 17 years of front line work with women and their partners in search of sexual empowerment. Our customers have fundamentally informed our approach to what we do and have given us an understanding of just how vast an arena sex and sexuality is.

As an organization we’ve faced censorship, unwarranted legal barriers, black listing, and fear mongering — and it’s left us keenly aware of society’s fears around sexuality. We’ve encountered wonderful allies over the years such as Options for Sexual Health, midwifery clinics, progressive faith organizations, sex educators in North America and abroad, cottage industry proprietors, and physicians in private practice. Through these welcomed (and even the not so welcomed) engagements we’ve enjoyed an exchange of ideas and information that has made for layers of knowledge difficult to parallel under any other circumstance.

And yet there is so much to learn! We have experiences to share and artifacts to loan —we arguably have a collection of vibrators that rivals even the best sex toy museums! From the early 1900 Hamilton Beach New Life Vibrator donated to us in the very early days of our business by an aged man who understood right away that we’d be the place to appreciate and display his family heirloom to the 1956s Sonoid Spheroid Action vibe (complete with packaging and instruction manual) donated to us by a lovely woman whose mother had passed away and who couldn’t bring herself to sell it at the yard sale!

We’re very much looking forward to seeing the first iteration of the exhibition design concepts, and to continuing this discussion of sexuality and sex education over the upcoming year.

Andrea Dobbs has worked as Design and Display Manager at Womyns’Ware since 2004.

Join in the conversation on Twitter: @xtalkinthecity #xtalkMOV

Get your glam on - Art Deco Chic opening soon!

Roll out the red carpet and get your glam on… Art Deco Chic is coming to the MOV (March 8 through September 23).    

Art Deco Chic:  Extravagant Glamour Between the Wars features more than 60 women’s garments from the 1920s and 30s. Handpicked for their decadent beauty and exquisite craftsmanship, many of these garments boast couture labels like Chanel, Vionnet, Patou and Schiaparelli

Commodore Ballroom opening night gownNotable Vancouver treasures include this black gown (right), worn to the opening of the Commodore ‘Cabaret’ in 1929.  Handbags, hats, shoes, jewelry and dresses (like this golden sunburst flapper shift (below) illustrate the distinctive, sleek geometry of the Art Deco period. 

Art deco flapper dressIf you just can’t wait to see what else we have in store, you can immerse yourself on a glittering night on the town here at the MOV for the Art Deco Chic Opening Night  on Wednesday, March 7. [Note: The opening night is primarily for Members and VIPs, so a limited number of tickets are available for purchase, and must be bought online beforehand!].

Dress Code?  Vintage glam of course! We’ll all be reveling in the sassy spirit of these roaring ‘boom and bust’ eras so this is your big chance to float into the room like a tall glass of champagne!

 

 

Hot vintage styling tips to get you ‘the deco look’

Attitudes & Inspirations…Think of rebellious young flappers…The exuberant movement of Josephine Baker…Sweet cinema darlings like Mary Pickford or Clara Bow  (the original ‘it girl’)…The confident modernism of the Empire State Building…The bright lights of Broadway…The streamlined  elegance of  Coco Chanel  and vintage Vogue couture …Mae West in all of her cheeky swagger…Jean Harlow dripping in long, cream satin and bombshell shine…Marlene Dietrich smoking in a tailored tux…Smoldering Greta Garbo or those famous Betty Davis eyes. 

For a little extra inspiration, you can also check out these videos on 1930s hair and makeup.

And if you’re now day dreaming about the perfect outfit, you could always take a trip out on the town and do a little vintage shopping at some of these great local stores:

If you read this after the event has already happened, we hope you’ll join us for some upcoming events that celebrate this Art Deco Era!

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