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Posted by: Nicki Merz on March 24, 2017 at 12:32 pm

Glory Days panel (left to right) Iain MacIntyre (moderator), Bob Lenarduzzi, Lui Passaglia, and Dennis Kearns.


 

Thursday night’s Glory Days panel discussion was a mixture of laughter, insight and comradery, as three Vancouver sports legends gathered to talk about sports and lifestyle in the 1970s.

The event featured former Whitecaps FC player Bob Lenarduzzi, former Vancouver Canucks defenceman Dennis Kearns, and former BC Lions placekicker/punter Lui Passaglia. Moderated by the Vancouver Sun columnist, Iain MacIntyre, questions were raised about how different the sporting experience and profession have become. The discussion also hit on their relationships with the fans, the city’s vibrant music scene, and even their struggles with AstroTurf!

Sitting before a mural of exclusive black and white photos from the Vancouver in the Seventies exhibition, the four started the event off with how conditioning and the level of work put into professional athletics have changed.

Bob Lenarduzzi, who is the current club president of the Whitecaps, instantly remarked “training camps!” Specifically mentioning how players would show up having not practiced in the off season. Now, players keep themselves constantly fit. Training camps are for staying in shape, not getting back into it. Dennis even commented on a time player where once allowed to smoke between periods. Times have certainly changed!

When asked what it felt like to be a part of a sports entity, Lui notes that Vancouver was becoming a “big league city” and how special it was have the opportunity to play in his home town. Bob and Lui went on to reminisce on growing up in the same East Van neighbourhood and the irony that was Bob winning a kicking contest, while Lui won a soccer contest.

So what is the biggest change in their respective sport? “Longer shorts,” says Bob. The audience laughs. He goes on to mention how sports science and sports psychology have drastically evolved and how these things make a difference more than ever today. “Bigger, faster players,” says Lui, also mentioning how TV has brought sports into homes 24/7. Dennis remarked on the “phenomenal young players” he’s seeing today, and how entertaining these athletes are.

Inspired by the lively dancing photos in the backdrop, an audience member asked the former players what their favourite part of the music scene was back then. Lui points to Bob, “You should’ve seen him on the dance floor.” The men go on to mention Frank Sinatra, Sly and the Family Stone, and Elton John at the Colosseum. Oh yeah, and Bob loves disco!

When asked what one word best described their 1970s Vancouver experience, Lui answered “Humbling.” Dennis and Bob both rebelled by answering with three. “National Hockey League” remarks Dennis, smiling eye to eye while Bob says simply, “living the dream.”

Bob, Lui, and Dennis brought the 70s sports era back to life at Glory Days. To learn and see more of what life was like in the city during the 1970s, explore the Vancouver in the Seventies exhibition on through July 16, 2017.

Bob Lenarduzzi reminisced about the parade on Granville Street following the 1979 NASL Championship. This photo featuring goalie Phil Parkes (left) and captain John Craven (right) with the trophy was taken by Ralph Bower, Vancouver Sun, September 9, 1979.

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Posted by: Anonymous on February 8, 2017 at 1:48 pm

Photo above taken by singer Win Butler after he stole Rebecca Blissett’s camera from the photo pit at an Arcade Fire concert; she’s the photographer without a camera.


 

In the publishing industry, change is constant and rapid.

Newspapers that once produced a hard-copy paper every 18 to 24 hours, now publish online 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The photographers who once filed four photos in a workday, may now file 40.

Gerry Kahrmann, PNG Staff PhotoPhotojournalist Gerry Kahrmann began his career nearly 40 years ago, shooting for community papers when Tri-X and Kodachrome were the basis of print photojournalism and newspapers ran in-house labs to develop their film.

After a short stint at the Calgary Sun, Kahrmann returned to Vancouver and in 1983 became a staff photographer at Pacific Newspaper Group (PNG), publisher of the Province and Vancouver Sun.

He tested his first digital camera during the Queen’s royal tour and the opening of the 1994 Commonwealth Games, heralding what he did not know at the time would be a new era in photojournalism.

Three months later, PNG transitioned both of its papers away from film, under the lead of photographer Nick Didlick, and by July 1, 1995, PNG’s newspapers were among the first in North America to transition to exclusively digital images.

At the forefront of that digital revolution, Gerry Kahrmann and his colleagues have evolved and changed the way they do their work, seldom coming into the office and filing remotely from all over Metro Vancouver, multiple times per day. Along with still photos, which are sometimes posted online within minutes of a shoot, photographers also produce videos clips that accompany online stories, and reporters are posting images in real time to social media feeds, blogs, and websites.

‘Technology’ is can be defined as ‘something that speeds up communication.’ Over the past 40 years, media and its consumption have changed a lot. Now, more than ever, there is an increased demand for quick (or instantaneous) information delivery.

The Museum of Vancouver and moderator Jennifer Moreau of the Burnaby Now, have assembled a group of highly accomplished photojournalists (Rebecca Blissett, Richard Lam, John Lehmann, and Kahrmann) to consider the historical significance of the shift from film to digital photography and the role it has played in altering the media’s approach to documenting news. On the evening of Thursday, February 9, the panel will talk about issues surrounding authenticity and the currency of photojournalism in a snap-happy social media landscape will be discussed, as well as what media industry practices might look like in the future.

This ‘Happy Hour’ event kicks off at 6pm, and the discussion begins at 7pm. For more information and tickets, visit this page.

Posted by: Angela Yen on December 15, 2016 at 2:04 pm

Vancouver in the Seventies: Photos from a Decade that Changed the City is now on view at the Museum of Vancouver.

The exhibition displays over 400 photos from The Vancouver Sun collection. To get a closer look and to celebrate some of these stunning photographs, each Friday we'll be selecting our Five Favourite Photos from each year of the seventies. 


 

1) The photo itself looks as unreal as the wing-walker stunt. It is almost cartoon like. I love how it appears like it's taken on a fake backdrop or on a soundstage. 


August 10, 1979 -   Wing-walker Robert Oakes, twenty-one, on the opening day of the Abbotsford Air Show atop a Super Stearman piloted by Joe Hughes. Photo by George Diack (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 79-0516)

 

2) A great joyous photo. I especially love the scattered flower petals/confetti which feel very indicative of the free spirted decade.


September 9, 1979 - The city celebrates with a victory parade down Granville Street for the NASL champion Vancouver Whitecaps, with goalie Phil Parkes (left) and captain John Craven (right) with the trophy. Photo by Ralph Bower (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 79-0817)

 

3) For any sushi lover or foodie in Vancouver it's great that an early photo of chef Tojo was documented.


November 14, 1979 - Leading the movement that would turn Vancouver into a renowned foodie paradise is sushi chef Tojo at Jinya Restaurant on West Broadway. Photo by Ken Oakes (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 79-1646)

 

4) I suddenly feel happy myself by just looking at this photo. The four distinct expressions are great and with the champagne dripping mid air, the photo feels very in the moment.


1979 - Whitecaps after winning North American Soccer League Championship (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun)

 

5) Such a dreamy and romantic photo. The two women look so glamourous that I assumed they were socialites or movie stars. It was to my suprise that the caption revealed the photo is of two prostitutes on the corner of Georgia and Hornby.


November 14, 1979 - Prostitutes at the corner of Georgia and Hornby. Photo by Ken Oakes (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 79-1648)

 

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Posted by: Angela Yen on December 8, 2016 at 11:02 am

Vancouver in the Seventies: Photos from a Decade that Changed the City is now on view at the Museum of Vancouver.

The exhibition displays over 400 photos from The Vancouver Sun collection. To get a closer look and to celebrate some of these stunning photographs, each Friday we'll be selecting our Five Favourite Photos from each year of the seventies. 


 

1) A familiar sight where a rare snow day leaves a Vancouverite underprepared.


January 3, 1978 - Trudging through town—note the Woodward’s bag—on a rare snow day in the city.. Photo by Brian Kent (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 78-0006)

 1) With the housing issues in Vancouver it's always fascinating to see these hosuing development photos. It's great how the downtown skyline looms over the small family homes.


March 9, 1978 - Construction worker at work on a building at 7th and Laurel in False Creek. Photo by George Diack (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 78-0912)

3) A great fashion forward shot where you can see the candid reactions of the conservative business man and elder couple.


August 31, 1978 - Models Joan Tremblay and Ariane Poole wear plastic jeans for a fashion shoot near the Hotel Georgia. Photo by George Diack (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 78-3257)
 

3) Similarily to the photo above this image paints a clever contrast between a new progressive/liberal generation to a more conservative past generation. The photo is also early evidence of trends appropriating eastern culture that is now associated with present "Vancouver lifestyle" - i.e. Yoga, naturapathic medicine


August 16, 1978 - Hare Krishna devotees chant and play drums on Granville Street. Photo by Mark van Manen (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 1978 Krishnas)

5) This photos captures a tender and intimate moment without feeling intrusive. It's a lovely wide shot where the field lights act as a romantic spotlight over the couple.

August 15, 1978 - Young couple take in the baseball game at Nat Bailey Stadium. Photo by Glenn Baglo. (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 78-3012)


 

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Posted by: Angela Yen on December 1, 2016 at 3:27 pm

Vancouver in the Seventies: Photos from a Decade that Changed the City is now on view at the Museum of Vancouver.

The exhibition displays over 400 photos from The Vancouver Sun collection. To get a closer look and to celebrate some of these stunning photographs, each Friday we'll be selecting our Five Favourite Photos from each year of the seventies. 


 

1) With the hype of the upcoming film, Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, this photo encapsulates the amazing longevity and success a film can have over decades.


June 24, 1977 - Star Wars ticket buyers line up at the Vogue Theatre on Granville Street on opening day. The film would become part of the biggest movie franchise in history. Photo by Glenn Baglo (Courtesty of The Vancouver Sun)

2) A great shot that really marvels in the advancement of transportation/technology. The Seabuses look so strong (almost like tankers) and very cleanly and mechnically sit on top of the water.


February 15, 1977 - Trial run of the new Seabuses, which were set to start service in June. Photo by Dan Scott (Courtesty of The Vancouver Sun 77-05622)

 

3) In addition to the photo's humour I'm impressed that this exact spot on Granville Street is still an adult shop.

June 23, 1977 - Two curious women check out the naughty wares in an adults-only store. Photo by Glenn Baglo (Couresty of The Vancouver Sun 77-2253)

4) The monstrous cranes reflect the scale and signifcance of Robson Square and how it marked its place as the downtown centre.


June 29, 1977    A forest of cranes at the new Vancouver courthouse and Robson Square project. Photo by Brian Kent (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 77-2315)

5) Another shot that captures how some things never change. The totem poles in Stanley Park remain a key tourist spot and symbol of Vancouver and its connection to the First Nations people.


August 27, 1977 -  Stanley Park’s iconic totem poles have long been a tourist favourite. Photo by Deni Eagland (Courtesty of The Vancouver Sun 77-3088)

 

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Posted by: Angela Yen on November 24, 2016 at 11:58 am

Vancouver in the Seventies: Photos from a Decade that Changed the City is now on view at the Museum of Vancouver.

The exhibition displays over 400 photos from The Vancouver Sun collection. To get a closer look and to celebrate some of these stunning photographs, each Friday we'll be selecting our Five Favourite Photos from each year of the seventies. 


1) The grass, water, city and sky stack up so perfectly on top of each other - the idyllic playground. There's also great energy in just the flow of the girl's hair. 


August 2, 1976 - Mary Mitchell, 7, of Vancouver rides a big rubber ball overlooking the West End. Photo by Bill Keay (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 76-2753)

 

2) The way the curtains mirror the the bars of the patio creates an interesting monochromatic pattern. The endless windows with closed curtains in direct contrast to the exposed woman suntanning, implies a clever self awareness on the photo's voyeurism.

April 10, 1976 - High-rise suntanning on the seventh floor of a West 11th Avenue apartment building. Photo by Ralph Bower (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 76-1203)

 

3) Quintessential 1970s childhood. It's wonderful how everything in this photo may have been deemed "nerdy" at the time but now contains essentially everything people think is cool.


October 9, 1976 - Heng Look, twelve, Lev Delang, nine, and Nicholas Delang, ten, check out the goods at a comic book club at the Britannia branch of the Vancouver Public Library. Photo by Ralph Bower (The Vancouver Sun 76-3385)

 

4) A list of favourite photos from the seventies would not be complete without some representation of disco. This fun shot from Annabelle's nicely sums up the jive boogie era.


October 30, 1976 - People dance to disco music at Annabelle’s. Photo by Glenn Baglo (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 76-3622)

5) The photo is strikingly composed with the words on the window acting like a headline/caption and the young man's face and hand, centred and in focus. In many ways it seems posed but the young man's expression appears candid and quite hard to read.  

January 3, 1976 - Alnoor Vergee wipes away the steam at his father’s dry cleaning shop on Davie Street in the West End. Photo by Glenn Baglo (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 76-0009)

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Posted by: Angela Yen on November 17, 2016 at 2:52 pm

Vancouver in the Seventies: Photos from a Decade that Changed the City is now on view at the Museum of Vancouver.

The exhibition displays over 400 photos from The Vancouver Sun collection. To get a closer look and to celebrate some of these stunning photographs, each Friday we'll be selecting our Five Favourite Photos from each year of the seventies. 


 

1) A great shot showing the development of what is now the iconic city centre in downtown Vancouver.

September 11, 1975 - Aerial view of the new Vancouver courthouse and Robson Square complex. Photo by George Diack (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 75-3297)

 

2) I love how the photographer finds a new percepective in representing an otherwise ordinary shot.

March 24, 1975  -  Couple walk past the skylight at the Sedgewick Library at U.B.C. Photo by Deni Eagland (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 75-1230)

 

3) Perfect horizontal lines with a distinct foreground and background. The man is in the prime spot. Yet despite its immpecable composition there is something haunting and surreal about it.

October 14, 1975 - Man walking in Burlington-Northern freight yard with the misty city in the background. Photo by Ian Lindsay (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 75-3724)

 

 4)  A gorgeous shot of Grouse Mountain with impressive lighting and contrast.

December 16, 1975 - A picture-perfect night of skiing on Grouse Mountain. Photo by Ian Lindsay (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 75-4528)

 

5) Tina Turner looks strong and stunning in this photo. Her signature legs never looked longer. Also incredibly interested that this show happened at BCIT!

February 8, 1975 - Tina Turner puts on a show with the Ike and Tina Turner Revue at a dance at the B.C. Institute of Technology. Photo by Glenn Baglo (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 75-0459)

 

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Posted by: Angela Yen on November 11, 2016 at 11:00 am

Vancouver in the Seventies: Photos from a Decade that Changed the City is now on view at the Museum of Vancouver.

The exhibition displays over 400 photos from The Vancouver Sun collection. To get a closer look and to celebrate some of these stunning photographs, each Friday we'll be selecting our Five Favourite Photos from each year of the seventies. 
 


1) A rainy noir like photo captures the current moods in the city. 


March 8, 1974  - People with umbrellas on a rainy day. Photo by George Diack (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 74-0740)

2) Fun energetic photo. Looks like a still out of a buddy-cop film.

June 19, 1974 - Spanish Banks lifeguards Jim Harris and Glenn Schultz demonstrate an amphibious beach buggy and the art of the walkie-talkies to Bonnie Stefanko and Lois Tomlinson. Photo by  Ralph Bower (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 74-2140)

3) I like how Kits Beach looks pratically the same as it does today. There's even a road bike propped up in the middle of the beach which is such a classic Vancouver symbol.

August 5, 1974 - Kitsilano Beach on a summer day. Photo by Deni Eagland (Courtresy of The Vancouver Sun 74-2782)

4) A slice of life photo that captures the humour in everyday things.

August 19, 1974 -  A Canada Post worker takes a break in the mail relay box on the corner of Beach and Chilco in the West End. Photo by  Rob Straight (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 74-2926)

5) Looks like dating in Vancouver was no fun in the seventies too.

December 5, 1974 - Couple at Harry C’s singles bar. Photo by Glenn Baglo (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 74-4329)

 

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Posted by: Angela Yen on October 31, 2016 at 2:36 pm

Vancouver in the Seventies: Photos from a Decade that Changed the City is now on view at the Museum of Vancouver.

The exhibition displays over 400 photos from The Vancouver Sun collection. To get a closer look and to celebrate some of these stunning photographs, each Friday we'll be selecting our Five Favourite Photos from each year of the seventies. 


 

1) Interesting skyline shot to compare to how the city looks today.

 June 26, 1973  - Seaplane and skyline of city at Coal Harbour. Photo by John Denniston (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 73-2344)
 

2) I find this photo inspiring as it shows a young Svend Robinson delving into his passions and supporting the community at an eary age, unbeknownst of the influenitial Canadian political figure he will become.

August 1, 1973 - Svend Robinson, who went on to become a long-time Member of Parliament (1979-2004), working at the Youth Referral Centre for transient youth at 1845 West Georgia Street. Photo by Brian Kent (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 73-2881)

3) Chinatown feels bustling and exciting with the wall of signs and power lines overflowing to the point where the family crossing the street is almost camouflaged into the background.

August 30, 1973 -  A mom and her children cross East Pender Street in Chinatown early in the morning. Photo by John Mahler (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 73-3391)
 

4) The composition really mirrors the mood in the photo and the faces of the reporters says it all. The way they are hovering down on Bill Bennett and pointing their mics directly in his face, further emphasize the discontent and the pressure coming down on him.

November 25?, 1973 - Bill Bennett wins the leadership of the Social Credit Party at the convention. Photo by John Mahler (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 73-4426)
 

5) This photo accompanies a series of fashion shots, however this particular one stands out because on top of the man's cool fashion sense, it feels extremely candid and natural. There is also a nice balance of masculine and feminin with his muscular build and stern look juxtaposed his long flowing hair and big heeled shoes. This image is the cover of the Vancouver in the Seventies book which inspired the exhibition.

August 14, 1973 - Summer street fashion on West Georgia Street with the Devonshire Hotel in background. Photo by Vladimir Keremidschieff  (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 73-3098a)


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Posted by: Angela Yen on October 27, 2016 at 3:12 pm

Vancouver in the Seventies: Photos from a Decade that Changed the City is now on view at the Museum of Vancouver.

The exhibition displays over 400 photos from The Vancouver Sun collection. To get a closer look and to celebrate some of these stunning photographs, each Friday we'll be selecting our Five Favourite Photos from each year of the seventies. 


1) My favourite from the entire collection. It captures a group of people who are individual and closed off from each other and striking their different poses, but at the same time there's a sameness and mundanity in their actions that pegs them as part of the same. It captures a visual of everday life that didn't seem extraordinary at the time (people making phone calls at a phone booth) but in the present is special and a kind of historic evidence, because it's a visual that would simply not exist today due to the changes in technology. The composition is also great with its strong horizontal lines, the fashionable young man facing head on and slightly off centre. Each person is wonderfully framed by the walls of the booth that if you were to zoom in on each booth you'd have another great image. This photo has a lot going for it.


February 15, 1972 - Pay phones at the Vancouver International Airport. Photo by Glenn Baglo (Courtesty of The Vancouver Sun 72-0514)

2) This one is a favourite for its display of typical male fashion at the time (denim jacket, thick mustache, cowichan sweater) and how they look like they could be two regular guys hanging out today in East Van. 


May 3, 1972 - Photographers Rod Gillingham (left) and Curt Lang, who received a Local Initiatives grant. Photo by Deni Eagland (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 72-14383)

3) Pure joy and fanatstic energy in this photo. When you read the school was demolished later that year it puts that emotion in check.


May 11, 1972 - Students at Sir William Dawson elementary school in the West End. The 1913 school was demolished at the end of the school year. Photo by Peter Hulbert (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 72-1526)

4) The image is multicultural without it being political or the focus of the photo. It's just two kids hanging out by Coal Harbour and one of them has awesome pants.


October 7, 1972 - Brad Kilburn and Willy Ivory take in the view of Coal Harbour from Stanley Park. Photo by Glenn Baglo (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 72-3309)

5) The area around Main and Cordova obviously looks very different now than it did in 1972 which is why this photo is interesting - to a modern Vancouverite, the odd thing about it isn't the pile of garbage but that the rest of the street is immaculate, shiny and bright.


May 5, 1972 - A municipal workers’ strike results in piles of trash in the Main and Cordova area. Photo by George Diack (Courtesy of The Vancouver Sun 72-1519)

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