Programs

March 2017

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Posted by: Nicki Merz on March 31, 2017 at 10:56 am

It’s no secret that the global Fashion industry is wasteful. In fact, it’s the second most polluting industry in the world next to Oil. The average North American discards around 81 pounds of clothing per year, and that scary number. What’s even more shocking is that within a year of being made, three-fifths (3/5) of clothing produced ends up in landfills.

Events like Vancouver’s Eco Fashion Week aim to bring awareness to these issues and help promote the movement of upcycling. Returning for its 12th season, the Vancouver-founded event highlights the importance of moving towards a sustainable textile industry and celebrate today’s most innovative fashion!

But what exactly is upcycled fashion?

Simply put, upcycling is the process of making something new and improved from old and used items. It goes beyond reusing and recycling by building upon the original materials. The outcome is a new, handmade, eco-friendly, and one-of-a-kind piece.

 

So, what does it look like?

Many designers are bringing upcycling to life, including Evan Biddell. Winner of Project Runway Canada Season ­1, Biddell has transformed second-hand clothing from Value Village into a fully realized fashion collection. Value Village by Evan Biddell (VV by EB) just debuted at Toronto Women’s Fashion Week and features 81 pounds of repurposed and upcycled garments.

In an interview with Goldie, Biddell gave some insight on what inspired VV by EB.

“Rock & Roll.  It’s going to be loud and hard-hitting.  We wanted to create a memorable show and be loud as a voice for the cause.”

And he shared a little bit about what textiles are being used in the collection.

“Weight was a factor.  Heaviness.  Leather, suedes.”

As to what inspired Biddell on this project and the opportunity to work with Eco-Fashion week…

“I was born into it… I grew up shopping at Value Village. You know, everyone wanted those track jackets in the late ‘90s and you’d get them at Value Village… I started making clothes when I was sixteen or seventeen.”

VV by EB is a perfect example of how the textile industry is finding innovative solutions in sustainable fashion, which has become more important than ever in today’s fast fashion world.

To learn more about Evan Biddell’s collection and the excitement of upcycling, join us at

the Museum of Vancouver on April 2 for the Upcycled Fashion panel discussion. Stylist Ellen Balsevich will also join the discussion, while Kelsey Dundon, editor of The Anthology, will moderate.

The 81lb Challenge – Value Village by Evan Biddell will be on display at the Museum of Vancouver from March 30 - April 17

 

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Posted by: Nicki Merz on March 24, 2017 at 12:32 pm

Glory Days panel (left to right) Iain MacIntyre (moderator), Bob Lenarduzzi, Lui Passaglia, and Dennis Kearns.


 

Thursday night’s Glory Days panel discussion was a mixture of laughter, insight and comradery, as three Vancouver sports legends gathered to talk about sports and lifestyle in the 1970s.

The event featured former Whitecaps FC player Bob Lenarduzzi, former Vancouver Canucks defenceman Dennis Kearns, and former BC Lions placekicker/punter Lui Passaglia. Moderated by the Vancouver Sun columnist, Iain MacIntyre, questions were raised about how different the sporting experience and profession have become. The discussion also hit on their relationships with the fans, the city’s vibrant music scene, and even their struggles with AstroTurf!

Sitting before a mural of exclusive black and white photos from the Vancouver in the Seventies exhibition, the four started the event off with how conditioning and the level of work put into professional athletics have changed.

Bob Lenarduzzi, who is the current club president of the Whitecaps, instantly remarked “training camps!” Specifically mentioning how players would show up having not practiced in the off season. Now, players keep themselves constantly fit. Training camps are for staying in shape, not getting back into it. Dennis even commented on a time player where once allowed to smoke between periods. Times have certainly changed!

When asked what it felt like to be a part of a sports entity, Lui notes that Vancouver was becoming a “big league city” and how special it was have the opportunity to play in his home town. Bob and Lui went on to reminisce on growing up in the same East Van neighbourhood and the irony that was Bob winning a kicking contest, while Lui won a soccer contest.

So what is the biggest change in their respective sport? “Longer shorts,” says Bob. The audience laughs. He goes on to mention how sports science and sports psychology have drastically evolved and how these things make a difference more than ever today. “Bigger, faster players,” says Lui, also mentioning how TV has brought sports into homes 24/7. Dennis remarked on the “phenomenal young players” he’s seeing today, and how entertaining these athletes are.

Inspired by the lively dancing photos in the backdrop, an audience member asked the former players what their favourite part of the music scene was back then. Lui points to Bob, “You should’ve seen him on the dance floor.” The men go on to mention Frank Sinatra, Sly and the Family Stone, and Elton John at the Colosseum. Oh yeah, and Bob loves disco!

When asked what one word best described their 1970s Vancouver experience, Lui answered “Humbling.” Dennis and Bob both rebelled by answering with three. “National Hockey League” remarks Dennis, smiling eye to eye while Bob says simply, “living the dream.”

Bob, Lui, and Dennis brought the 70s sports era back to life at Glory Days. To learn and see more of what life was like in the city during the 1970s, explore the Vancouver in the Seventies exhibition on through July 16, 2017.

Bob Lenarduzzi reminisced about the parade on Granville Street following the 1979 NASL Championship. This photo featuring goalie Phil Parkes (left) and captain John Craven (right) with the trophy was taken by Ralph Bower, Vancouver Sun, September 9, 1979.

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Posted by: Viviane Gosselin on March 17, 2017 at 5:21 pm

As part of our exploration on the relationship between public and private collections in All Together Now, I conducted an interview with Heather Gordon, Vancouver City Archives.

Major James Skitt Matthews - Vancouver historian, collector, featured in All Together Now

I wanted to know more about Vancouver’s first historian and collector, Major James Matthew (1878- 1970) whose work continues to have a huge impact on Vancouver’s historiography. Local historians, filmmakers, authors and other creatives researching Vancouver’s past are bound to stumble upon Major Matthews’ extensive records.

Heather’s insights and knowledge of Major Matthew’s collection were most helpful:

Viviane: How did Matthews started collecting?

Heather: Major Matthews arrived in Vancouver in 1898, twelve years after the city’s incorporation. Shortly after his arrival, he began writing about Vancouver. To get information, he searched old maps and spoke with old-timers. In the process, Matthews became acutely aware of the imminent loss of the Vancouver’s “pioneers” and of the city’s rapid transformation. He saw himself as the champion of Vancouver’s history.

Viviane: As someone who is surrounded by his collection and is constantly interacting with it, how would you describe Major Matthews’ collecting philosophy, in three words:

Heather: Eccentric – both the items he collected and how he catalogued them. Even today, some things are almost undiscoverable unless you 'think like Major Matthews.'

Subjective – he was the quintessential collector-archivist. He collected what he wanted to collect, interpreted it and edited it. He worked exactly opposite the way professional archivists work today. We leave the interpretation to our researchers. Not so the Major.

Militaristic -- he loved anything military.

Viviane: What would you say is one of Matthews’ most important contribution to the city archives?

Heather: His collection forms the core of the Archives’ private-sector holdings, holdings that have grown substantially since his death. Those holdings complement the City government records in our care, and are crucial for telling the non-government side of the story of Vancouver’s development.

Viviane: Could you tell us a bit more about the digitization of the collections of books Early Vancouver?

Heather: Early Vancouver is one of the most used resources at the Archives and we wanted to make it more widely accessible. Written between 1931 and 1956, and over 3,300 pages, it is a collection of Matthews’ interviews with pioneers, along with annotated photographs and maps and transcriptions of letters and newspaper articles. What you see online is actually a transcription of the text, not a digitized version. The paper Matthews used was too thin and his typewriter ink too blurry to result in a scanned image we could keyword index. Funded by the Vancouver Historical Society, hundreds of hours of transcription was the answer, with digitized versions of the photos and maps added to the transcribed version.

Viviane: Could you mention a few examples of people (not just historians) using Matthews’ archives for their work (you can be as specific or generic as you want)

Heather: Academics, of course, but also bloggers and social media enthusiasts who love to feature his photographs. The photos are also popular among business owners (particularly restaurateurs) who exhibit large reproductions of his photos, complete with his handwritten annotations, on their walls. One of my favourite uses, though, is by author Lee Henderson. He consulted Early Vancouver extensively in order to evoke the Vancouver of 1886 for his novel The Man Game.

All Together Now: Vancouver Collectors and Their Worlds features Major Matthews' collection of Vancouver history.

All Together Now: Vancouver Collectors and Their Worlds featuring Major James Matthews’ collection closes Sunday, March 19.

 

 

 

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Posted by: Anonymous on March 7, 2017 at 10:51 am

Vancouver’s locally owned and operated fine art gallery, Chali-Rosso Art Gallery, has partnered with several leading, local artists to create a unique show that will present contemporary art works alongside historical masters for the first time.

The show titled “Reflections: Inspired by the Masters” will feature Vancouver’s top contemporary artists as well as historical masters, such as Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, Salvador Dalí, Joan Miró,
Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, among many others. A select group of leading contemporary artists has been challenged to create works of art that are directly inspired by any of the masterworks in Chali-Rosso's gallery collection, including works by the above Modern Masters. The contemporary art works will be exhibited next to their inspirational works by the Masters.

This project is solely dedicated to explore the connection between artists of the past and artists of the present and aims to illustrate how relevant the art of the Modern Masters continues to be.

“It is important to ask what message art carries for us, here and now, especially about works of art created in a time and place so distant from us. We believe that fine art is not separated, not developed in a vacuum, but instead, it builds a continuum along the lines of artists.” Susanna Strem says, the owner and curator of the gallery.

Featured Masters: Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, Salvador Dalí, Joan Miró, Marc Chagall, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Robert Motherwell, Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, Damien Hirst.

Featured Contemporary Artists: Bill Higginson, Deborah Bakos, Farah Samari, Hale Yin, Judit Haber, Karen Hollowell, Kerry Vaughn Erickson, Lan Lao, Richard Brodeur, Sarah Symes, Stewart Stephenson, Tiarra Edmundson, Tristesse Seeliger and Wendi Copeland.

The exhibition is free for the public and will run for two weeks at the gallery’s downtown location at 549 Howe Street, Vancouver.

EXHIBITION: MARCH 10 - 24, 2017
OPENING RECEPTION: MARCH 10, 7:00 pm - 10:30 pm
ALL DAY OPEN HOUSE: MARCH 11, 10:00 am – 6:00 pm

More info.

The project and exhibition has been endorsed by the Museum of Vancouver.

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