Programs

January 2015

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Posted by: Myles Constable on January 26, 2015 at 1:00 pm

We have received extensive coverage of c̓əsnaʔəm, the city before the city.

Below is a sneak peek of the exhibition at MOV by Dawn Chabai from City's Breakfast Television, or view here:

“We want Vancouverites to recognize that there was a city here before they came,” said Howard E. Grant. “When contact came, historians, archaeologists, and writers, wrote a lot about other tribes but very little written about Musqueam. It is now our time to tell our story.” - Excerpt from the Vancouver Sun: 'Vancouver exhibition at three sites tells the story of Musqueam city on the Fraser'  Read more

Shaw Go WestCoast explore the exhibitions at Museum of Vancouver and Musqueam:

 

Below, NovusTV host Maike Evers explores all three exhibitions:

"The key across the project is to re-establish a connection between past and present, to show the continuum between the early Musqueam people and their descendants still here, still looking for justice and recognition." Excerpt from Vancouver Magazine's 'The City Before the City: The Musqueam First Nation'  Read more

"Many people think of Vancouver as a "new" city. But long before the gleaming towers, the industry and the traffic was another thriving community called "cesna?em." Watch Jordan Wilson's interview with Gloria Macarenko on Our Vancouver: 'Vancouver's Musqueam past revisited' here and listen to Jordan Wilson give a tour of the original c̓əsnaʔəm site on CBC Early Edition: here click the "Listen" button.

"When guests visit the Museum of Vancouver’s newest exhibit beginning next week, the first thing they will see is a nail protruding from the wall beside its entrance. A Musqueam tradition advises visitors to someone’s home to “hang” any preconceived thoughts on a nail like this so people enter the space with an open mind and an open heart." Excerpt from The Globe and Mail: 'Using traces from Vancouver’s past, a vibrant community is recognized'  Read more

"The origins of this city, now lying unseen below the streets of Marpole, date back 4,000 years, and the people who built it have been here even longer." Excerpt from the Westender: 'Groundbreaking, three-part exhibit traces the origins of Vancouver back to its Musqueam roots'  Read more

“It’s one of the first times where Musqueam’s really been able to tell our own history in our own words,” said Jordan Wilson, a member of the Musqueam Nation, co-curator of the exhibit at the Museum of Anthropology and part of the curatorial collective for MOV. Excerpt from Vancouver Courier: 'Exhibits bring Musqueam legacy alive'  Read more

"The exhibition asks, whose home is Vancouver? How have newcomers claimed Vancouver as their own? How do the Musqueam understand their lengthy connection to this place?" Excerpt from Price Tags: 'c̓əsnaʔəm, the city before the city'  Read more

Groundbreaking, three-part exhibit traces the origins of Vancouver back to its Musqueam roots - See more at: http://www.westender.com/arts/c-%C9%99sna%CA%94%C9%99m-the-city-before-t...
The origins of this city, now lying unseen below the streets of Marpole, date back 4,000 years, and the people who built it have been here even longer. - See more at: http://www.westender.com/arts/c-%C9%99sna%CA%94%C9%99m-the-city-before-t...

"At all three venues, the didactic components are thoughtfully composed and the exhibition design is handsome and effective. The elements that knit past and present together and that most engage the visitor, however, are the unearthed belongings and the quotes from and interviews with Musqueam elders and other community members." Excerpt from the Georgia Straight: 'c̓əsnaʔəm unburies the city's lost Musqueam world Read more

"The story of Vancouver is typically told with a gaping hole, leaving out the perspective of the First Nations that called this land home for thousands of years before Europeans arrived." Excerpt from from Vancouver Metro: 'New exhibit tells Vancouver’s story through Musqueam First Nation’s eyes'Read more

“We want to make sure the Musqueam perspective is predominant,” Gosselin says. “Hopefully, when people come in here they don’t think the museum is speaking, but rather Musqueam presenting and representing the community.” Excerpt from Megaphone Magazine: 'Where We Started'  Read more

"Our elders tell young people to go slow and be careful, because if something happens to one of us, there is a page in our living history torn out and lost forever." - Morgan Guerin. Excerpt from the Vancouver Observer: 'Can we mend thousands of years of displaced history in Vancouver?Read more

“People often think of Vancouver as a new city, when in fact it is one of the most significant sites of ancient cultures in Canada – one that has even been compared to other societies such as the Egyptian and Roman societies.” - Terry Point. Excerpt from VanCityBuzz 'South Vancouver 5000 Years Ago'  Read more

 

 

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Posted by: Rachel Roy on January 20, 2015 at 3:42 pm

Harkening back to a bygone era: Haunting melodies performed at MOV on January 17th, 2015.

Ever want to escape today’s hustle and bustle to a slower more romantic time? Vocalist Patricia Hammond charmed us with her pre and post war era tunes, bringing a poised and elegant presence to the stage. Patricia and guitar accompanist Budge Schachte have a soulful chemistry — evermore so when it was revealed to the audience that they met in person for the first time the day before!

The first half of this MOV event included a selection of 1940s tunes that brought out the hardships and far away travels of these war times when soldiers left their families and lovers behind. Patricia encouraged the audience to join in with “You’ll get used to it”, “Wish me luck as you wave me goodbye!” and “Will meet again some sunny day”.

After a costume change to a more whimsical dress, appropriate for the 1950s post war era, the second half of the show brought a feeling of letting go with songs such as, “This is my lovely day” and “Enjoy yourself.”  “Far away places with strange sounding names” had an emotional resonance that reminded me of adventurous train travels in Europe.

Quite the conversationalist, Patricia revealed her passion for collecting sheet music. She discovered “She wears red feathers and a hootie hootie skirt” at Carillon Music in Vancouver, and performed it for the first time this night, with charm and grace.

Patricia’s 1950s dress had a playful fabric, which swayed as she sang and danced.

She revealed that it was a reproduction designed by Vivien of Holloway, and amusingly mentioned that certain songs tickled the bones of this dress, acting as an “imaginary singing teacher” as she sang. 

To see more dresses from the 1940s and 1950s, visit MOV’s From Rationing to Ravishing Exhibition through March 8th 2015!

 

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Posted by: Rachel Roy on January 5, 2015 at 1:56 pm

Transport yourself back in time with a retro musical performance from London England singer Patricia Hammond and accompanying guitarist Budge Schachte. Experience a lyrical journey of wartime and postwar era tunes that will trigger your imagination as you stroll through MOV’s Rationing to Ravishing The Transformation of Women’s Clothing in the 1940s and 1950s  exhibition—free admission with your paid ticket!

After the concert, come explore more than 80 garments presented in the gallery spaces from cocktail dresses to jumpsuits to wartime wedding dresses and much more this Saturday, January 17th from 7:00 to 8:30pm at MOV. A cash bar will be available on site to enhance your evening’s enjoyment!

For further ticket and event information please visit http://www.museumofvancouver.ca/programs/calendar