Programs

August 2013

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Posted by: Guest Author on August 28, 2013 at 11:36 am

Guest Author: Catherine Evashuk 

In 1980, my pregnant sixth grade teacher, Mrs. R, decided to explain how babies were made in a straightforward way, and debunk that old myth about storks bringing babies to doorsteps.  After she explained how babies were made, she asked if anyone had any questions.  My hand shot up immediately: “If sex is to make babies, that must mean you’ve had sex twice,right?” (Mrs. R was pregnant with her second child). I remember her turning completely red and murmuring, “Not exactly!” This confused me, since she had just explained that sex was to make babies. If sex was for anything other than that specific goal, why would people have it?

Fast forward to 2013, to the Museum of Vancouver’s ‘Sex Talk in the City’. This amazing and comprehensively conceived exhibition is divided into three parts: ‘The Street’, ‘The Bedroom’ and ‘The Classroom’. As a Sexual Health Educator, ‘The Classroom’ is of course my favourite.  Wandering through ‘The Classroom’ where I can read Sex Ed questions scrawled onto desk, is always a hoot. My favorites include: “If a man gets a boner, what does a woman get?” and “What’s a G Spot and where is it located?”

Things have come a long way since I was a sixth grader in 1980.  Many of the questions students are asking today are about the pleasurable side of sex. These days, sex educators are trained to quite differently, and I must admit, do a much better job than Mrs. R. was able to do when teaching their students the basics of sexual health and reproduction . Still, some students’ eyes widen in disbelief when I explain that when people have sex, most of the time it is not for making a baby! In fact, one of the most common questions I find in the anonymous question box after a lesson is “If sex is to make babies, what’s birth control for?”

I like that so many parts of this exhibition focus on the pleasurable side of sex.  In ‘The Bedroom’ section, there’s a wall displaying vibrators, including some dating back to the late 1800s! I guess it shows that pleasure is always part of the equation, but the way we talk about it, has changed quite a bit.  Of course, the educator in me is also pleased that there is a significant portion of the exhibition - In ‘The Street’ – dedicated to showing and explaining an array of contraception options and condoms, which help people enjoy safer sex.

I wish Mrs. R had explained that sex can feel good and that making babies is only part of it.  Perhaps I should give her a call to invite her to the exhibition so we can check it out together!

*Catherine is a Certified Sexual Health Educator based in Vancouver, and is a volunteer at the Museum of Vancouver.

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Posted by: Anna Wilkinson on August 28, 2013 at 5:28 am

 
This week brings some new takes on common Vancouver themes like public space interventions, cycling, and transit. You'll learn where to track down a mobile park, what people want in a bike route (and how to flirt while riding), and about a potential downside to our new transit fare system.
 
Park-A-Park. So the parklet at East 1st and Commercial has been around for a while (since the end of July) but by now many of us have had a chance to experience its unique and diminutive charms. As Julien Thomas, the urban interventionist who created the mobile Park-a-Park in collaboration with Emily Carr explains, the space is meant to encourage connection: “Sometimes conversations with strangers are very surface level, but I think if you add a twist, say, in a disposal bin on the corner of a busy street, really interesting conversations can happen.”
 
Cycling Report Card. The Vancouver Sun recently spoke to Kay Teschke about what Vancouver is doing right, and what it needs to work on in terms of cycling safety and infrastructure. According to Teschke, a UBC professor and cycling advocate, separated bike lanes are the way to go, hands down, for reasons of accessibility, comfort, and safety. Another possible benefit? Facilitating bicycle flirtations
 
Transitional Transit. We've all heard about the controversy around the Skytrain no longer accepting bus transfers with the implementation of the Compass card system. But the Georgia Straight brings up another valid point: the $6 price tag attached to Compass cards could make it very difficult for social service agencies to provide transit support to people living below the poverty line
 
Happy Birthday, Stanley Park. And lastly in honour of Stanley Park's 125th anniversary, an article exploring its influence on the city. (Oh, but wait, there's a bit of a dark side). 
 
At the MOVeum:
 
 
[Image: The Narrows, Stanley Park, ca. 1900. Photo courtesy of the City of Vancouver Archives, CVA 677-487]
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Posted by: Anna Wilkinson on August 20, 2013 at 6:27 am
What do crowdfunded indie films, plastic-eating bacteria, and an anti-bullying libretto have in common? They all happen to be inventive responses to very specific issues being faced by Vancouverites. This week we take a look at the local makers, inventors, and designers who are tackling the city's economic, environmental, and cultural challenges.
 
Rising from the Ashes. Roberta McDonald provides an insider perspective on the struggling film industry in Vancouver and BC for The Tyee. Since recent cutbacks, it's been hard to ignore the unemployment and financial heartbreak surrounding the industry, but as she argues, there's also a "growing tribe of film veterans banding together, leaning into their passions and reviving the struggling industry." How are they doing it? In part, through increasingly popular crowdfunding campaigns
 
Eating Garbage. After visiting the Vancouver Waste Transfer Station during a class trip, scientists Miranda Wang and Jeanny Yao started investigating the relationship between a pollutant in plastic waste and the local bacteria strains that seemed to be feeding on it. What they found were microorganisms that convert harmful phthalates into carbon dioxide, water, and alcohol. Their research was recognized as having the greatest commercial potential at the Sanofi BioGENEius Challenge. And in other good environmental news: the tallest sustainable office building is set to be built in Vancouver.
 
Giving Voice to the Bullied. And lastly, in response to a heartbreaking social issue, the Vancouver Opera has commissioned an unexpected musical production. Slam poet Shane Koyczan will be writing a libretto dealing with issues of bullying for the VO. As Koyczan told the Vancouver Sun, "I think it’s going to be a beautiful fit. Opera is the original marriage of words and music, and there’s a theatre element, a dramatic element. It’s right up my alley.
 
At the MOVeum:

October 2 - Legacy Dinner
November 8 - Interesting Vancouver 2013
 
[Image: Trash on the ground, 1970s. Courtesy of the Museum of Vancouver collections, H2004.54.12.01]
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Posted by: Anna Wilkinson on August 13, 2013 at 7:04 am
This week we explore what it means to be a good neighbour in Vancouver. From humans living side by side with insects, to getting along with our green-thumbed neighbours, to heritage buildings coexisting with new housing developments in the Downtown Eastside, we find that being a good neighbour involves working on our interpersonal skills, embracing diversity, and being prepared for a little bit of conflict.
 
Five-Star Insect Hotel. The Environmental Youth Alliance, in partnership with the City of Vancouver, has built a habitat for bees in the Oak Meadows Park at 37th and Oak. The hope is that with bee populations on the decline, the converted telephone booth will attract a thriving insect population to a corridor of green space in the area. We love the idea of upcycling increasingly obsolete phone booths for the purpose too!
 
Food Fights. To those who thought there was no dark side to the proliferation of urban gardens in the city, guess again. While positives like sustainable food sources, job creation, and community engagement far outweigh negatives,The Vancouver Sun reports that urban green spaces can cause neighbourly disputes. And there's also the complicated matter of commercial property getting tax breaks when used for temporary community gardens.
 
Heritage in the DTES. With all the talk of gentrification in the DTES, it's easy to ignore another issue confronting the neighbourhood: the loss of heritage buildings. With a possible Local Area Plan that would see some 10,000 residents move into the area, local historian James Johnstone argues that protecting historical buildings has become all the more important. But some tough questions remain: what happens when historical preservation is at odds with new social housing developments?
 
At the MOVeum:
 
August 15 - Redacted Readings
October 2 - Legacy Dinner
 
[Image: Rainbow chard in Vancouver community garden. Photo by Steph L via Flickr]
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Posted by: Anna Wilkinson on August 1, 2013 at 8:32 am

Sometimes there's a fine line between being on the cutting edge and just plain being on edge. This week we bring you two lovely stories of Vancouver's willingness to push boundaries and embrace new, fresh ideas. And for good measure: one story of a divisive new bike plan that has excited some and induced anxiety in others.

Beach Biking. We start with the story that's put some Vancouverites on edge: the freshly approved Kitsilano bike route that will see a one-kilometre stretch of Point Grey Road closed to commuter traffic. Many cyclists are loving the idea of biking directly between the Burrard Bridge and Jericho Beach, while some local residents fear the impact of 10,000 motorists being diverted onto their streets. Meanwhile The Tyee asks: Why was this such a controversial topic in the first place? And Gordon Price tells us to relax.

One Little Free Art Exchange. As the Globe and Mail reports, "It is believed Metro Vancouver has between five and 10 “little free libraries.” And now, one little free art exchange." Cheryl Cheeks' brain-child, the aptly named Dude Chilling Art Exchange, located in Mount Pleasant's Guelph Park (also known as Dude Chilling Park) was unveiled this weekend. We're pretty excited to check out the first public spot in Vancouver where you can swap anything from sculpture and paintings to poetry and photos.

Sunshine, Pride Week, and Rainbows. In other very exciting news: Davie Street Village unveiled Canada's first permanent rainbow crosswalk on Monday to kick off Vancouver's Pride Week celebrations. According to Spencer Chandra Herbert, NDP MLA for the West End, the colourful crosswalk symbolizes the city's unique contribution to gay rights across the country. Check it out at the corner of Davie and Bute.

At the MOVeum:
October 2 - Legacy Dinner
 
[Image: Rainbow Crosswalk on Davie Street. Photo courtesy of Sean Neild via Flickr]