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Posted by: Angela Yen on July 14, 2016 at 4:21 pm


Discussion Series Pivotal to a Deeper Understanding of Musqueam Culture

Recently, the Museum of Vancouver has been hosting several events on Musqueam culture, heritage and history in support of our award winning exhibit, c̓əsnaʔəm: The City Before the City. The sharing of knowledge on this ancestral village (previously located in the South Vancouver’s Marpole area) is so pivotal to gaining a deeper understanding of Musqueam culture and the city’s history.

After a canoe building session and tour of the Musqueam Cultural Centre Gallery with Kelly Louis in June, the discussion series returned to MOV. Last week, Wayne Point - a practiced archeologist and craftsman in traditional tool making and Musqueam artifacts - shared with our audience several tools and materials ranging from quartz, carved stone and basalt arrowheads. The talk was followed by a walk through the c̓əsnaʔəm: The City Before the City exhibition. Point elaborated on the intricate histories and details of the many displayed belongings.

This discussion series continues on July 21 when Alec Dan shares his experience taking part in the c̓əsnaʔəm vigil to protect this 4,500 year old village and cemetery from development in 2012 and draw connections between past and present Musqueam culture and heritage. More info HERE.

In September, Larry Grant, Jill Campbell and Vanessa Campbell will present an introduction to Musqueam’s traditional language. More info HERE.

Posted by: Anonymous on June 29, 2016 at 4:07 pm

Check out what the media has to say about our new exhibition:

CBC Our Vancouver: Collector spotlights 40 years of bus tickets, memorabilia in new MOV exhibit

Shaw TV “Around Town”

News1130: 

Vancouver is Awesome: Check out these 20 bizarre collections

Daily Hive: http://dailyhive.com/vancouver/all-together-now-museum-of-vancouver

Vancouver Sunhttp://vancouversun.com/entertainment/local-arts/five-reasons-to-see-museum-of-vancouvers-all-together-now-vancouver-collectors-and-their-worlds

Vancouver Magazine: Vancouver’s most unconventional collections - a "must-see exhibition."

Vancouver Courier: http://www.vancourier.com/entertainment/picks-of-the-week

Georgia Straight: http://www.straight.com/arts/722001/rare-array-vintage-artificial-limbs-joins-museum-vancouver-collectors-show

Westenderhttp://www.westender.com/news-issues/vancouver-shakedown/pinball-chinese-menus-and-road-kill-1.2283054

Sing Tao Vancouver: http://vancouver.singtao.ca/

NUVO Magazine: http://nuvomagazine.com/art/all-together-now-vancouver-collectors-and-their-worlds

Vancouver ObserverThe history of Vancouver's Chinatown, documented in menus

Surrey Leader: A ticket to B.C. transit history

BC Local News: http://www.bclocalnews.com/entertainment/384332941.html

Jewish Independent: http://www.jewishindependent.ca/share-in-collectors-passions/

Eve Lazarus - Blog: http://evelazarus.com/the-collectors/

My Van City: http://myvancity.ca/2016/06/28/together-now-exhibit-mov-showcases-collections-collectors/

Daily Hive: Four local collectors pay homage to retro gaming in Vancouver

Beat Route: Rob Frith captures musical moments in time with concert poster collection in ‘All Together Now’ exhibit

North by Northwest on CBC Radio: Marie Allen talks to Sheryl McKay at 01:16:30 http://ow.ly/Hxd1302mtgV\

All Points West on CBC Radio: History of famous Vancouver Chinatown restaurant WK Gardens revealed through collected menus

 

Posted by: Angela Yen on June 27, 2016 at 4:44 pm


Last week, we launched our latest exhibition ALL together NOW, featuring 20 eclectic collections. Everything from prosthetic limbs and pinball machines, to corsets and taxidermy are on display until January 8, 2017. Accompanying each collection, we have incorporated an interactive component to encourage visitors to engage and truly immerse themselves into the collections.


Rob Frith at Neptoon Records. Photo by Rebecca Blissett

One of the collectors included is Neptoon Records owner, Rob Frith. His stunning collection of concert posters offers a glimpse into the past, and an opportunity to discover the legendary artists that played shows in Vancouver. It’s interesting to consider some of the iconic venues that the city has lost, like The Cave Supper Club on Hornby Street or the Embassy Ballroom on Davie Street.


Vancouver band, The Collectors

Along with the posters, a listening station is setup where you can put on a pair of headphones, sit back and listen to some hidden gems which have been tucked away for far too long. Handpicked by Frith himself (from his own personal record collection) the playlist puts a spotlight on local indie artists and past Vancouver groups like sixties psychedelic band The Collectors (what a coincidence!)  It’s how we discovered their hypnotic track “Eyes” which we’ve gleefully featured in our highlight video of the exhibition’s opening night. Check it out below!

According to Wikipedia, The Collectors were originally the house band for CFUN radio during the early 1960s. After a handful of albums and soundtracks to Canadian films, lead singer Howie Vickers left the group in 1969. The remaining members of the band reconstituted themselves as Chilliwack, with Bill Henderson taking over lead vocals.

Posted by: Anonymous on June 27, 2016 at 11:44 am

People like collecting. It's probably is connected back to our ancestors' hunter/gatherer days.

These days, we collect all sorts of of things. For some it's shoes, for others it's figurines. A lot of people have grandmothers who collected spoons or plates, or uncles that collected coins and stamps. There's even someone who collects computer viruses.

While some people are definitely hoarders, the displays that make up the MOV's new exhibition are comprised of "serious" enthusiasts who collect their obsession(s) with intent.

ALL together NOW: Vancouver Collectors & Their Worlds features 20 rare, beautiful and unconventional collections. There's artificial eye balls and prosthetics, corsets and drag queen costumes, pinball machines and juke boxes. These are not your typical collections!

The following images have been shared by visitors of the exhibition, illustrating just the tip of the iceberg in regards to the thousands of objects on display.

 

 

Self explanatory #typewriter #captionless #vancouver #travel

A photo posted by Charmayne Leontowich (@luckycharmayne) on

 

Very hard to choose which photo from the @museumofvan opening tonight. So here is a tiny portion of the toy section.

A photo posted by Georgia Straight (@georgiastraight) on

 

Nostalgia trip. #vancouverisawesome #vancity #mycollectionatmov #dailyhivevan #hellobc

A photo posted by Luigi Conti (@igiconti) on

 

Collection

A photo posted by monarch5 (@monarch5) on

 

This gem is currently on exibition at the Museum of Vancouver!! OMG!! Blast from the past!!

A photo posted by Reuben Bibera (@inocent24) on

Posted by: Myles Constable on June 21, 2016 at 4:53 pm

The following data visualization films were created by Andy Yan as part of the Your Future Home: Creating the New Vancouver exhibition at the Museum of Vancouver.

The videos provide statistical context to each of the exhibition's four themes: public space, housing affordability, residential density, and transportation in the City of Vancouver.

The Land and Public Space

These data visualizations and maps on the land characteristics, history of settlement patterns, and public space in the City of Vancouver.

Residential Density

These data visualizations and maps on residential density, population demographics, and land use zoning in the City of Vancouver.

Housing Affordability

These data visualizations and maps on housing affordability, housing types, and building age in the City of Vancouver.

Transportation and Transportation Networks

These data visualizations and maps on transportation and transportation networks in the City of Vancouver

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Posted by: Angela Yen on June 10, 2016 at 4:52 pm


On June 2, 2016 we concluded our 30th Anniversary Expo ’86 celebration with a fun night centred on Expo’s main theme of transportation. With a bike valet readily available outside the museum, we encouraged our guests to bike down to the event in spirit of Bike to Work Week and of course the theme of the night.

We had music sets from Bali styled troupe, Gamelan Bike Bike, who incredibly, play instruments that are made out of discarded bike parts. After Happy Hour and Gamelan Bike Bike’s first set, the event proceeded with three special presentations from architecture and design experts Henry Tsang, Alana Green and Jenni Pace. The evening was hosted by Westender writer/ CBC personality Grant Lawrence who - along with the panel - shared his personal experiences of Expo ’86.


From left to right: Grant Lawrence, Alana Green, Jenni Pace and Henry Tsang

Henry Tsang - who actually worked at Expo fresh out of graduating from post-secondary - shared his initial impressions and the history of how the False Creek area developed after the major event. Tsang, whose media installations have been exhibited internationally, shared his interactive mapping project, “Maraya” (meaning “mirrors” in Arabic) which drew interesting design parallels between False Creek/Seawall and Dubai’s waterfronts and walkways.

Alana Green - who was only six when Expo ’86 happened - began her presentation by pointing out the appreciation of Expo’s design from a child’s perspective, noting its vibrant colours, whimsical shapes and sheer comical scale of objects like the Swiss Swatch Watch display. To this day, Green contemplates if this early introduction to these particular design aesthetics has influenced her design approach as an adult.

Originally from Alabama, seasoned architectural historian Jenni Pace, had no direct link to Expo ’86. However, as an outsider looking in, she shared how this gave her a unique view and exploration of the design and transportation themes of Expo. Her research concluded that the massive “Highway ‘86” sculpture/art installation which stretched 217m long was the major highlight for most people who attended. She deconstructed the sculpture’s post-apocalyptic and brutalist design and presented its possible connections to other sculptures and buildings around the world.

The night couldn’t have been completed without one more dazzling set from Gamelan Bike Bike. Michael Trenzer, a composer and Gamelan music aficionado, introduced the group and spoke about the beloved Indonesian music and how Expo ’86 actually hosted the first International Gamelan Festival. As the bike bars and gears clanked and clinked away, everyone sipped their last drops of beer, now full of knowledge on all things Expo ’86.

Big thanks to the presenters, Grant Lawrence, Gamelan Bike Bike and to our supporting partners at Westender, The Bicycle Valet, HUB and Red Truck Beer Company.

To see more photos from the event visit: https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10153491358226433.1073741885.9...

 

Posted by: Angela Yen on June 1, 2016 at 1:00 pm

May 19, 2016 the Museum of Vancouver (MOV) continued to celebrate the 30th anniversary of Expo ’86 inviting the city to recollect the days of big hair, synths, neon fanny packs and the biggest public event in BC’s history. The evening began with drinks and snacks while guests mingled and checked out the display cases of retro artifacts and archive footage.

Followed was a special presentation featuring four architects and designers who contributed to Expo ’86. The talk was hosted by landscape architect Margot Long, who first introduced Bruno Freschi, the Chief Architect and famously known for designing the Telus World of Science, or better known to locals as, Science World. Other presenters included Alan Hart, key developer of the Expo Line/SKYTRAIN, Clive Grout, designer behind the corporate pavilions such as General Motors and Plaza of Nations, and Peter Cardew, contributor to Expo Gate and the CN Pavillion.

An ongoing mention was the scale and just how many people came together to make it happen. Expo ‘86 put Vancouver on the map and pushed the city forward in terms of urban and transportation development. The event provided thousands of jobs to designers, architects and exhibitioners across the country and helped launch the careers of budding designers such as Long, who like many contributors to the Expo made the move to Vancouver from Calgary and other neighbouring cities. To this day, Expo ‘86 remains the most recent World’s Fair to be held in North America.


From left to right: Bruno Freschi, Peter Cardew, Alan Hart, Margot Long and Clive Grout.

To see more photos from this event, please visit this gallery.

Posted by: Myles Constable on April 22, 2016 at 12:31 pm

The Museum of Vancouver is honoured to have been chosen by the readers of the Vancouver Courier as a top destination in the Art Gallery/Museums category for Stars of Vancouver 2016.

Read an interview with our Collections Associate Jillian Povarchook, and discover her choices for best of Vancouver!

 

Posted by: Myles Constable on March 17, 2016 at 11:59 am

This workshop series invites participants to explore the wider issues and challenges in Vancouver through a design lens.

Sunday afternoons (2:30-5:00pm) throughout April, the Museum will curate a series of playful explorations and thoughtful workshops in conjunction with the Your Future Home exhibition and its central themes: Affordability, Density, Mobility and Public Space. Each workshop session can be experienced as a standalone event, or participate in all of them for maximum engagement!

 

April 3: Modify Vancouver: An Introduction to Design Fiction

Hosted by the Vancouver Design Nerds, this workship will introduce participants to Design Fiction through the research of guest speaker Ian Wojtowicz. It will spark creativity, collaboration and a methods for generating conceptual ideas as they pertain to local issues around Vancouver’s mobility and public space.

Participants will work in small groups to put theory into action, re-imagining a Vancouver without any limits. Designers use the practice of Design Fiction to propose and provoke discussion about what is and what could be, to produce projects that sit between the plausible and imaginary. This is a unique technique that takes a speculative approach to creative work; think science fiction for the present! Join the Design Nerds and use your creative imagination to design near future realities around such areas as public transportation and public space.

Workshop leaders and registration info.

 

April 10: Dear Vancouver: An Experimental Letter Writing Campaign on Public Space

This workshop invites participants to brainstorm and create a new and experimental campaign for communicating with, through and across the city of Vancouver. Workshop coordinators - Justin Langlois and Alicia Medina Laddaga - will lead participants through creative forms of writing to synthesize letters that will be documented and subsequently distributed though post and/or online.

Letter writing campaigns have long been the first line of action by citizens asking for change in their communities. Whether writing to city hall, letters to the editor, or even posters in public places, the ways in which we address our city and one another goes a long way in shaping how we think about and live within Vancouver. Dear Vancouver workshop will implement collective letter drafting of enthusiastic praise, important demands, and open-ended questions to get to know where we live, and how we live in Vancouver. No experience in letter writing is necessary. Non-English speaking community members are highly encouraged to attend.

Workshop leaders and registration info.

 

April 17: Make It Rain

This workshop, facilitated by members of The Vancouver Public Space Network (VPSN), explores the concept of making public spaces in rainy climates usable and enjoyable all year round. Participants will review and discuss precedent studies, followed by a “live” analysis of remote video feeds from around the city of Vancouver. In an effort to work through solutions for more rain friendly city spaces, participants will be asked, ‘what are the impacts of a predominantly rainy climate on the design of public spaces?’

This workshop will develop materials and documentation that will be used as a basis for advocacy and education directed towards making Vancouver’s public spaces better adapted for the rainy months. After participating in the Make it Rain workshop you will be inspired to connect and celebrate one of Vancouver’s most overlooked assets: the rain.

Workshop leaders and registration info.

 

April 24: Improv-ing the City. Designing Policies through Participative Theatre

Alec Balasescu and Jonathan Bleackley of Civic Renewal Lab host a role-playing and improv workshop that will explore Vancouver’s development, housing, and affordability policies. Guided by the question, "for whom is the city built?" and borrowing from similar policy-based theatre work, participants will be led in acting out the impact of key housing policies and policy questions, with an interest towards helping residents understand the stakes, opinions and goals of the various players involved, and why finding solutions can be difficult.

Actors will be assigned diverse roles such as homeowner, renter, real estate agent, foreign investor, contractor banker. They will be provided with a current or proposed policy and be asked to act out the implications of that policy. The eventual goal of Improv-ing the City is to help participants better understand the complexity of the issues, what is causing the real estate crisis, and identify what policy changes Vancouver could adopt moving forward to address the problem.

This event has been canceled but may be rescheduled in the future.

Posted by: Myles Constable on January 18, 2016 at 12:59 pm

Andy Yan discusses the City's future and the Your Future Home exhibition on CBC's Our Vancouver with Gloria Macarenko.

Gregory Dreicer and Richard Henriquez discuss Your Future Home on Global News.

Cover story from The WestEnder: The Museum of Vancouver’s newest exhibition looks to empower residents to shape their city’s future.

The Museum of Vancouver’s newest exhibition looks to empower residents to shape their city’s future - See more at: http://www.westender.com/news-issues/news/imagining-vancouver-s-future-1...
The Museum of Vancouver’s newest exhibition looks to empower residents to shape their city’s future - See more at: http://www.westender.com/news-issues/news/imagining-vancouver-s-future-1...

Listen to Sense of Place on Roundhouse Radio: Gregory Dreicer and Al Etamanski: January 18

Listen to Sense of Place on Roundhouse Radio: Gregory Dreicer and Andy Yan: January 25

Listen to Sense of Place on Roundhouse Radio: Bruce Haden with Dwayne Smith and Colin Harper: February 1

Listen to Sense of Place on Roundhouse Radio: Bruce Haden with Kari Dow and Ian MacDonald: February 15

Listen to Sense of Place on Roundhouse Radio: Bruce Haden with Kelty McKinnon and Melissa Higgs: February 22

Listen to Sense of Place on Roundhouse Radio: Bruce Haden, Kim Glauber, and Sean McEwen discuss Housing Affordibility: February 29

Museum of Vancouver exhibit looks to the future, via Vancouver Courier

"Your Future Home lets you visualize how this city’s future might look, instead of just reading about it. In fact, the exhibit looks like it might be so aesthetically pleasing, interactive, and entertaining that you might stop worrying—for an hour or two, anyway—about how you’re ever going to afford a home in this town." - via Georgia Straight exhibition review and photo gallery.

Your Future Home statistics curator Andy Yan declares 91% of Vancouver homes valued at more than 1 million dollars, via Global News.

Maike Evers from City Lights on Novus TV explores the Your Future Home exhibiiton.

Gregory Dreicer previews Your Future Home on Shaw Around Town.

"An ambitious new exhibition, currently on display at the Museum of Vancouver, is turning heads and spurring heated discussions about pressing topics." Your Future Home in Your Future City by Canadian Architect.

Podcast with Scalena Real Estate's Adam and Matt. Listen here.

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