Exhibitions

Artware: Northwest Coast Designs & Everyday Objects

Wednesday, October 29, 2014 to Sunday, January 11, 2015

Artware is a micro exhibition (in our studio space) that showcases Aboriginal-themed commercial products developed by Vancouver- based artists and companies.

The objects selected will highlight shifts in relationships between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal peoples, as illustrated in the design of the objects themselves and in the exchanges and practices to which they give rise.

In the Pacific Northwest, Aboriginal designs adorn private spaces and public places, as well as clothing worn and objects owned by Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal peoples alike. Vancouver in particular is well known for its public displays of Northwest Coast art, in parks, at the airport and in museums. This art can also be found in many private homes – and not just hung on walls and placed on mantelpieces, but also in kitchen cupboards and bedroom closets. In addition to being increasingly treated as a form of fine art, Northwest Coast designs are now also being mechanically reproduced on many decorative and utilitarian objects, such as mugs, pepper-grinders, tote bags, and T-shirts. Far from being souvenirs purchased only by tourists, these objects are very popular among locals, including Aboriginal individuals who use and wear them in their everyday life, as well as distribute them as potlatch gifts.

Anthropologist and guest curator Solen Roth conducted a year-long fieldwork in the city of Vancouver, examining the current configuration of the Native Northwest Coast artware industry. She’s interviewed a large number of local aboriginal artists, as well as aboriginal and non-aboriginal artware companies.

Artware features work by the following artists: Corey Moraes (Tsimshian), Corrine Hunt (Komoyue/Tlingit), Alano Edzerza (Tahltan), Shain Jackson (Sechelt), and Lyle Wilson (Haisla).

 

 

November 06, 2014 / 7:00 PM
Curator's Talk & Tour: Artware: Northwest Coast Designs and Everyday Objects | Nov 6

Curator's Talk & Tour
Artware: Northwest Coast Designs and Everyday Objects

The objects displayed in the MOV Studio’s latest micro exhibition, Artware: Northwest Coast Designs and Everyday Objects, are not just tourist souvenirs. The objects showcase Aboriginal-themed commercial products developed by Vancouver-based artists and companies. The objects selected highlight shifts in relationships between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal peoples, as illustrated in the design of the objects themselves and in the exchanges and practices to which they give rise.

Join exhibition curator and anthropologist Solen Roth and artist Lou-ann Neel for a talk and tour of Artware: Northwest Coast Designs and Everyday Objects. Learn more about the history of the Native Northwest Coast artware industry in Vancouver and efforts of Northwest Coast artists to make this market benefit their communities through meaningful collaborations and culturally sensitive entrepreneurship. Lou-ann Neel will also present the Authentic Indigenous Arts Resurgence Campaign, which aims to promote and support the work of Indigenous artists.

Date: Thursday, November 6th, 2014
Time: 7:00pm
Admission: This Talk & Tour is free to attend. General admission rates apply for access to feature and permanent exhibitions.

Solen Roth is an anthropologist whose work focuses on art markets and intercultural exchanges. She conducted her doctoral research on Vancouver's Northwest Coast artware market.

Lou-ann Neel (Ika'wega) is from the Mamalilikulla, Da'naxda'xw, Mumtagila and Kwagiulth tribes of the Kwakwaka'wakw Nation. She has been designing and creating original design works for over 30 years. She is also an arts administrator of culture and language programs and community development.

We are pleased to present this evening’s event free of charge, thanks to the generous support of the Intellectual Property Issues in Cultural Heritage project. Additional support for this program and micro exhibition is provided by the City of Vancouver and the British Columbia Arts Council. We acknowledge the financial support of the Province of British Columbia.

 

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