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December 02, 2014
Unprecedented, Three-Site Exhibition Reveals Archaeological & Cultural Origins of Vancouver

VANCOUVER, BC – Musqueam First Nation, the Museum of Vancouver (MOV), and the Museum of Anthropology (MOA) at UBC partner on a groundbreaking exploration of the city’s ancient landscape, and Musqueam’s early history and living culture. c̓əsnaʔəm, the city before the city is a series of three distinct exhibitions, opening simultaneously on January 25, 2015. The unified exhibitions will connect Vancouverites with c̓əsnaʔəm – one of the largest ancient village and burial sites upon which Vancouver was built – sharing its powerful 5,000-year history and continuing significance.

“People often think of Vancouver as a new city, when in fact it is one of the most significant sites of ancient cultures in Canada – one that has even been compared to other societies such as the Egyptian and Roman societies,” says Terry Point, Co-Curator of the Musqueam First Nation and MOV exhibitions. “Visitors to c̓əsnaʔəm, the city before the city will learn it is part of an ancient landscape, and will discover aspects of Musqueam heritage, culture, and knowledge that have never before been shared with the public.”

Located in the area now commonly known as the neighbourhood of Marpole in Vancouver, c̓əsnaʔəm is imbued with the history and culture of the Musqueam people. First occupied almost 5,000 years ago, c̓əsnaʔəm became one of the largest of Musqueam’s village sites approximately two thousand years ago. Generations of families lived at what was then the mouth of the Fraser River, harvesting the rich resources of the delta.

Over the past 125 years, archaeologists, collectors, and treasure hunters have mined the c̓əsnaʔəm village and burial ground for artifacts and ancestral remains, many of which are in museums and private collections locally and abroad. The land has been given various names since colonialism, including Great Fraser Midden, Eburne Midden, DhRs-1, and Marpole Midden – a name under which it would receive designation as a National Historic Site in 1933.

Today, intersecting railway lines, roads, and bridges to Richmond and YVR Airport, and a miscellaneous assortment of buildings and developments obscure the heart of Musqueam’s traditional territory. The significance of c̓əsnaʔəm to the Musqueam community remains undiminished despite this. In 2012, Musqueam community members held a 200+ day vigil when ancestral remains were unearthed at c̓əsnaʔəm, putting a stop to a proposed condominium development.

Opening simultaneously in January of 2015, these three c̓əsnaʔəm exhibitions will bring the rich history of the Musqueam Nation to the attention of Greater Vancouver audiences. Each exhibition will highlight a distinctive aspect of the significance of c̓əsnaʔəm:

Musqueam Cultural Education Resource Centre & Gallery
Curated by Leona M. Sparrow, Co-curated by Terry Point, Jason Woolman, and Larissa Grant this exhibition focuses on the sophistication of Musqueam knowledge and technology past and present. It makes connections through a continuum of knowledge and expertise over time. The exhibition will feature oral histories, community interviews, hәn̓q̓әmin̓әm̓ language associated with c̓әsnaʔәm belongings on display, and artifact recreation. It will be on display for a minimum of one year.

Museum of Vancouver (MOV)
This multi-year exhibition draws multiple connections between c̓əsnaʔəm artifacts, Indigenous ways of knowing, colonialism, heritage politics, cultural resilience, and contemporary Musqueam culture. It will include graphic and 3D modelling of maps and artifacts, original videography, family-friendly interactivity, and soundscapes blending traditional and modern sounds. The MOV exhibition is the work of a curatorial collective from Terry Point, Susan Roy, Viviane Gosselin, Larissa Grant, Leona Sparrow, Jordan Wilson, Jason Woolman, and Susan Rowley and will be on display for a minimum of five years.

Museum of Anthropology (MOA)
Focusing on Musqueam identity and worldview, and Curated by Sue Rowley and Jordan Wilson, this exhibition will highlight language, oral history, and the community’s recent actions to protect c̓əәsnaʔəәm. Rich in multi-media, it will demonstrate Musqueam’s continuous connection to their territory, despite the many changes to the land. This exhibition will be on display for one year.

Programs
As a way to further educate, enrich, and connect with people, public programming and events will be offered throughout the duration of the exhibitions’ run. The complete range of public programs will include a series of curated tours, cultural exchanges with Musqueam artists, elders, and activists, and cultural tours from Musqueam youth.

For further exhibition information, including complete details on public programs, please
visit: thecitybeforethecity.com

About Musqueam First Nation:
Musqueam First Nation are traditional hәn̓q̓әmin̓әm̓ speaking people whose territory, and dozens of villages, encompasses much of what is now the Greater Vancouver Regional District. Extensive networks of trade and relations radiate up and down the coast and into the interior. Although a metropolitan city has developed in the heart of Musqueam territory, the community maintains strong cultural and traditional beliefs and these networks. Families teach and pass on this traditional knowledge and history to their people, to keep culture and traditions strong. Musqueam people continue to thrive, with a population of over 1,200 people; relying on the guiding principles of knowing who they are and where they come from and the responsibilities they share. Nearly half of Musqueam lives on a very small portion of their traditional territory, known as the Musqueam Indian Reserve #2, located south of Marine Drive near the mouth of the Fraser River.

About MOV:
The Museum of Vancouver (MOV) connects Vancouverites to each other and connects Vancouver to the world. The museum is a gathering place that encourages social engagement and inspires conversation about the future. MOV exhibitions and collections invite exploration of contemporary issues and stories from the past. MOV activities ignite a passion for Vancouver and its people. The museum, an enthusiastic advocate for the city, is an independent non-profit organization that depends on support from the community.

About MOA
The Museum of Anthropology (MOA) at the University of British Columbia (UBC) is worldrenowned for its collections, research, teaching, public programs, and community connections. Founded in 1949 in the basement of the Main Library at UBC, its mission is to inspire understanding of and respect for world arts and cultures. Today, Canada's largest teaching museum is located in a spectacular building overlooking mountains and sea. MOA houses more than 42,000 ethnographic objects and 535,000 archaeological objects, including many, which originate from the Northwest Coast of British Columbia. The Koerner Gallery features one of Canada’s most important European ceramics collections, while MOA's recently opened Multiversity Galleries provide public access to more than 10,000 objects from around the world.

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________________________________________________________________________________
For further media information, contact
Laura Murray I T. 604.558.2400 I C. 604.418.2998
lmurray@lauramurraypr.com

 

October 09, 2014
Vancouver City Shapers Honoured at 2014 Legacy Awards Dinner

Monday evening, the Museum of Vancouver played host to the 3rd annual Legacy Awards Dinner that honours individual, families and companies who have shown outstanding vision and commitment to building a city that is ranked as one of the most impressive in the world.

The MOV invited well recognized city historians, urban planners, influencers in the business and philanthropic sector, as well as representatives from the MOV Board of Directors to the selection table. They spent two months reviewing over 50 nominees who have helped mould the city as we know it today and who continue to influence its path to tomorrow.

The 2014 winners were Wade Grant, Dr. Julio Montaner, Morris J. Wosk and Yosef Wosk.

Grant, the son of former Chief Wendy Grant-John and Councillor Howard E. Grant, was presented with the Emerging City Visionary Award for his work bringing together First Nations and New Immigrants, and forging new relationships between Aboriginal people and the City of Vancouver. Dr. Montaner was recognized with the City Shaper Award for his dedication to HIV/AIDS treatment as prevention, resulting in a decrease in infections and mortality. The MOV Legacy Award was presented to Yosef Wosk for his, and his father’s (Morris J. Wosk) extensive history of philanthropic work, benefitting diverse non-profit organizations, both locally and abroad.

Each of the award winners delivered gracious and moving acceptance speeches. Grant reminded guests of the value of multiculturalism; Montaner urged the public to put pressure on the federal government to adopt the UN AIDS treatment strategy; Yosef Wosk read an insightful poem he wrote specifically for the event, entitled ‘Museum as Matter and Metaphor.’

Museum of Vancouver CEO Nancy Noble explained the significance of the award winners: “At the MOV we see the city as a living artifact, and part of that is recognizing the work that has been done by people to make it what it is today. In this third year of awards we’re really starting to see what incredible minds and initiative we have within our city, and we’re excited to be recognizing this group of honourees for their contributions to our city’s story.”

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Photos of the award winners and the awards dinner can be downloaded here: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/latl1ivzqj39mrp/AADir0Mpxh16YjPXNfmRsMnXa?dl=0

For additional background on the award winners, visit:  www.museumofvancouver.ca/legacydinner

 

About the Museum of Vancouver

The Museum of Vancouver connects Vancouverites to each other and connects Vancouver to the world. The museum is a gathering place that encourages social engagement and inspires conversation about the future. MOV exhibitions and collections invite exploration of contemporary issues and stories from the past. MOV activities ignite a passion for Vancouver and its people. The museum, an enthusiastic advocate for the city, is an independent non-profit organization that depends on support from the community. The Museum of Vancouver is located in Vancouver at 1100 Chestnut Street (in Vanier Park).

 

Media Contact

Myles Constable,

Marketing Officer and Media Relations

mconstable@museumofvancouver.ca

604-730-5309

 

August 27, 2014
Ravishing exhibition revisits fashion trends of the 1940s and 1950s

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: August 27, 2014

(Vancouver, BC) — The Museum of Vancouver is excited to announce the opening of From Rationing to Ravishing on September 18, 2014. This exhibition will feature rare examples of haute couture and Vancouver-made clothing that reflect how WWII changed society.

From the collections of guest curators Ivan Sayers and Claus Jahnke—the team that created Art Deco Chic—and the vaults of the Museum of Vancouver, From Rationing to Ravishing will present more than 80 historic garments and accessories. Highlights include: wartime wedding dresses, Boeing Vancouver overalls, cocktail dresses, and fashions designed by renowned European couturiers, including Christian Dior, Cristóbal Balenciaga, and Elsa Schiaparelli.

The exhibition also includes a dress from Ceil Chapman, who produced high-quality, French-inspired garments. She was reportedly Marilyn Monroe’s favourite designer and counted Elizabeth Taylor and Mamie Van Doren as famous clients. Lauren Bacall’s shoes, Peruvian soprano Yma Sumac’s dress suit and a suit from Miss Germany 1955 will also be on display.

“In From Rationing to Ravishing, we tried to bring together a collection of garments and accessories that illustrate a variety of historical references,” stated Sayers, one of Canada’s preeminent fashion historians. Jahnke elaborates, “We chose the artifacts for their relevance, their appearance, and their stories.” This exhibition will demonstrate how historical events continue to shape our lives.

From Rationing to Ravishing is the second installment in a continuing series of fashion exhibitions with Sayers and Jahnke. Sayers—who thinks of his exhibitions as lessons in history—claims, “No era is better illustrated by an examination of its clothing than the period of World War II and the postwar years of recovery and rebuilding.“ During the war, fashion designers emphasized manliness; clothes were influenced by the need for practicality and economy. In peacetime, a womanly silhouette returned and then, in the 1950s, influenced by indulgence and amusement, designers made girlishness the rage.

From Rationing to Ravishing will include participatory features that engage families, including an activity station for kids and adults alike, and the opportunity to digitally wear period garments. Over the exhibition’s run, MOV will host a number of history-themed events, including two fashion shows that feature exceptional examples from Sayers’ private collection and two “talk and tour” events, also led by Sayers. 

Fashion history enthusiasts will get a sneak peek into the curators’ collection at Oakridge Centre, where five glamorous garments will be on display from September 11th through the 21st. Susan Nicol, General Manager at Oakridge Centre explains their commitment to this exhibition: “As a fashion and style destination in Vancouver for over 55 years, Oakridge Centre has been a driver of the evolution of fashion in the lower mainland. We are excited to partner with the Museum of Vancouver to showcase some of the significant trends of the past and to help bring to the community a little of our shared history.”

From Rationing to Ravishing: the Transformation of Women's Fashion in the 1940s and 1950s, opens to the public on September 18th; set to close March 8th, 2015. Additional exhibition and event information can be found at www.museumofvancouver.ca/ravishing

 

MOV Events:

Curator's Talk & Tour: From Rationing to Ravishing, with Ivan Sayers

  • Thursday, October 2, 2014 at 7:00pm
  • Thursday, December 4, 2014 at 7:00pm
  • Additional members-only dates to be announced

Join Vancouver's preeminent fashion historian and From Rationing to Ravishing guest curator Ivan Sayers for an informative stroll amongst displays of historic clothing within the exhibition space. Follow Ivan as he describes the evolution of women's fashion from wartime utility to postwar extravagance.

Fashion Show: From Rationing to Ravishing, with Ivan Sayers

  • Saturday, November 22, 2014 at 7:00pm
  • Saturday, February 28, 2015 at 2:00pm

Fashion historian and guest curator Ivan Sayers will produce and narrate live fashion shows that complement From Rationing to Ravishing. These shows will feature exceptional examples from Ivan’s own private collection and others.

 

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About the Museum of Vancouver

The Museum of Vancouver connects Vancouverites to each other and connects Vancouver to the world. The museum is a gathering place that encourages social engagement and inspires conversation about the future. MOV exhibitions and collections invite exploration of contemporary issues and stories from the past. MOV activities ignite a passion for Vancouver and its people. The museum, an enthusiastic advocate for the city, is an independent non-profit organization that depends on support from the community. The Museum of Vancouver is located in Vancouver at 1100 Chestnut Street (in Vanier Park).

Images of some of the standout garments and the curators, can be downloaded from this Dropbox:

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/zp6mzocarzwba25/AABx9h_Zl_ghInH3f5bMPc2Ia?dl=0

 

July 28, 2014
MOV Announces 2014 Legacy Awards Dinner Honourees: Morris and Yosef Wosk, Dr. Julio Montaner and Wade Grant

The Museum of Vancouver is proud to announce the winners of this year’s Legacy Awards. The MOV, through its selection committee, discovers outstanding people who are deserved of recognition for their efforts in creating a better Vancouver. The 3rd annual MOV Legacy Awards Dinner will take place on Monday, October 8th at the Museum of Vancouver.

In keeping with the Museum’s vision, to hold a mirror up to the city and lead provocative conversations about its past, present and future, it is appropriate that we recognize those individuals, organizations and even businesses that have and continue to make Vancouver the city it is today.

Each year the committee struggles to make the selections because there are so many worthy candidates. It is exciting, however, to realize how many incredibly people we have in this city and we are very excited to be honouring this group for their contributions to our city’s story.

The Museum of Vancouver will present its Legacy Award to Morris and Yosef Wosk. Father and son, Morris and Yosef have contributed to many local charities. Born in Russia, the late Morris Wosk moved to British Columbia in 1928. His hard work and strict adherence to honesty, fairness and respect for all, earned him success in business, a success he shared widely with the people of B.C. After nearly four decades building a family retail business, Morris turned his attention to the hotel and residential sector. For Morris, achievement in business is only one measure of success. The other being contribution to community. He generously gave his time, energy and resources to numerous causes, both locally and abroad, supporting diverse non-profit organizations. Morris Wosk is a member of The Order of British Columbia, The Order of Canada and has also been recognized for his philanthropic work internationally.

Morris and Dena’s son Rabbi Dr. Yosef Wosk serves as Adjunct Professor in the Department of Humanities at Simon Fraser University where he developed seminal programs such as The Philosophers' Café and The Canadian Academy of Independent Scholars. Active in communal affairs, Yosef is a media commentator, public speaker and published author who has founded and supported hundreds of libraries worldwide, endowed Vancouver’s Poet Laureate, and has lectured at a number of universities and institutes of higher learning throughout the world.  Identified as one of the top ten thinkers and most thoughtful citizens in the province, he is an appointed Member of The Order of British Columbia, a recipient of both The Queen's Golden and Diamond Jubilee Medals and is included in the Canadian Who's Who.

The MOV City Shaper Award will be presented to Dr. Julio Montaner, a Professor of Medicine and Head of the Division of AIDS at UBC. He played a key role in establishing the efficacy of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) and since then has established the role of ‘Treatment as Prevention’ using HAART to simultaneously decrease progression to AIDS and death, as well as HIV transmission. He was inducted into the Order of British Columbia in 2010, in part for his work resulting in a decrease in HIV/AIDS infections and mortality. Dr. Montaner was born in Argentina and completed his M.D. with Honours from the University of Buenos Aires in 1979. After completing a one-year post-doctoral fellowship at UBC and meeting his future wife, Montaner decided to remain in Vancouver, joining the faculty of St. Paul’s Hospital/UBC. He was invited to run the new HIV department that was being established in response to the emerging AIDS crisis. In 1992, he was joined by Michael O’Shaughnessy to found the B.C. Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS. In 1996, Dr. Montaner presented the results of his pioneering research on triple therapy to treat HIV infections at the XI International AIDS Conference in Vancouver, creating new standard for HIV drug therapy. Dr. Montaner served as the President of the International AIDS Society from 2008 to 2010, and as of 2013, continues to serve as an elected member of the Council of the International AIDS Society.

The Emerging City Visionary Award will honour Wade Grant, the son of former Chief Wendy Grant-John and Councillor Howard E. Grant, who was born and raised on the Musqueam Indian Reserve. After receiving an Arts degree from UBC, Wade worked in many different areas and attended UBC Law School.  He has participated on many volunteer boards and committees around the city and has been actively involved forging new relationships between Aboriginal people and the City of Vancouver. In 2004, at the age of 26, Wade was elected to Musqueam Chief & Council for the first time.  Wade was the Executive Assistant to the Provincial Minister of Public safety from 2006-2007. In 2007, Wade accepted a role in the office of Shawn Atleo who was the Assembly of First Nations Regional Chief at the time.  In 2009, Wade was named the Assistant General Manager of the Aboriginal Pavilion for the 2010 Winter Olympics. Wade is particularly proud of his work as Co-Chair for the Vancouver Urban Dialogues Project, which brought together the First Nations, Urban Aboriginal, and New Immigrants in ways that had never been done before. Recently, Wade accepted a role in the Office of the Premier as Special Advisor on First Nations and Aboriginal Issues.

Taking place in the MOV’s landmark building in Vanier Park, the Legacy Awards Dinner will offer guests an exclusive museum experience complete with live music, fine wine, and scrumptious food. Visit the MOV’s website at www.museumofvancouver.ca/legacydinner to purchase early bird tickets, for background on the honorees, and further details on how the awards were selected.

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About the Museum of Vancouver

The Museum of Vancouver connects Vancouverites to each other and connects Vancouver to the world. The museum is a gathering place that encourages social engagement and inspires conversation about the future. MOV exhibitions and collections invite exploration of contemporary issues and stories from the past. MOV activities ignite a passion for Vancouver and its people. The museum, an enthusiastic advocate for the city, is an independent non-profit organization that depends on support from the community. The Museum of Vancouver is located in Vancouver at 1100 Chestnut Street (in Vanier Park).

 

Media Contact

Myles Constable,

Marketing Officer and Media Relations

mconstable@museumofvancouver.ca

604-730-5309

May 14, 2014
Sasquatch Mask returned to Sts’ailes People

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: May 14, 2014

(VANCOUVER, BC) –  Today, the Sts’ailes Band (formerly Chehalis) will hold a private repatriation ceremony on their land near Harrison Hot Springs, to celebrate the return of a significant artifact in their people’s history. Earlier this week, the Museum of Vancouver (MOV) returned the Sasq’ets (commonly known as Sasquatch) mask to its rightful owner, 75 years after being donated to the institution.

At a ceremony held Monday at MOV, the Sts’ailes expressed their gratitude to the Museum of Vancouver for protecting their mask. A Musqueam First Nation representative also attended to welcome the Sts’ailes to their ancestral land.

MOV’s CEO Nancy Noble explained the importance of returning aboriginal belongings: “I believe that museums have a social and cultural obligation to consider repatriating certain objects from their collections to First Nations people.”

Noble describes the positive impacts of repatriation: “For aboriginal peoples, the return of an object with significant cultural or spiritual value can help to rebuild awareness, educate youth and strengthen ties to a culture that was often suppressed or taken away. And from the MOV’s point of view, the process is a way of building trust and developing relationships with the ultimate goal of narrowing the cultural divide that often still exists today.”

The Museum of Vancouver is proud to be aligned with the Vancouver Airport Authority, supporting sponsor of the First Nations Collection, in developing positive relations while returning artifacts of significance. During another repatriation ceremony in 2013, James Leon from Sts’ailes asked to view artifacts from the collection, believing that MOV might have the Sasq’ets mask, which had been missing since 1939, when it was donated by J.W. Burns. A formal letter from Sts’ailes requesting the repatriation of the mask was received by MOV in late 2013; the museum’s repatriation committee recommended the return soon thereafter.

Noble stated: “Every request is different and must be considered on its merits, but when objects were obtained improperly or have a high degree of cultural sensitivity within a community, repatriation seems like an obvious solution.”

All records indicate that Ambrose Point carved the Sasq’ets mask in 1937 or 1938 and wore it at Sasquatch Days, a celebration of aboriginal sport, ceremony, art and handicraft. Burns who was a teacher at the Chehalis Indian Day School was very interested in Sasq’ets and is often credited for bringing the word “Sasquatch” into common use. The Sts’ailes Band state that due to the mask’s extreme cultural significance, Point would not have sold it or given ownership to Burns, and that Point was dispossessed of the mask without permission.

The Sts’ailes Band has a close spiritual and cultural relationship with Sasq’ets. The Band recognizes Sasq’ets as having the ability to move between the physical and spiritual realms. A sighting or encounter with Sasq’ets is viewed as a gift and as a bestowal of responsibility within the Sts’ailes community. 

The Sasquatch Days celebration has been revived in recent years and will take place in Harrison Hot Springs on the weekend of June 7-8, 2014. This will be a special year because for the first time both the newly carved Sasq’ets mask and the original Sasq’ets mask will be present. These events are open to the public. http://www.tourismharrison.com/Sasquatch-Days

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Museum of Vancouver First Nations Collection Supporting Sponsor: 

Additional Resources:

Photo of the Sasquatch Mask (catalogue #AA69.01) from the Museum of Vancouver First Nations Collection supported by YVR: https://www.hightail.com/download/ZUcwdFdXRStQb0xOUjhUQw

Photo of Museum of Vancouver CEO Nancy Noble (second from left) returning the Sasquatch Mask to Sts’ailes Band elders in a private ceremony held May 12th at MOV in Vanier Park: https://www.hightail.com/download/ZUcwdFdXRStGR0hMYnRVag

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For interview requests or more information, please contact:

Myles Constable, Marketing Officer/Media Relations

mconstable@museumofvancouver.ca

Office: 604-730-5309

April 17, 2014
Museum of Vancouver celebrates 120 years

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: April 17, 2014

(VANCOUVER, BC) –  Today the Museum of Vancouver (MOV) reached a major milestone, as a collector of precious artifacts from around the world and the protector of Vancouver’s past. In recognition of 120 years, MOV will host a celebration on May 29th when admission will be $1.20 (always free for members). Following the Annual General Meeting that evening, birthday cake will be served and BC Place will be lit in the Museum’s colours. MOV’s celebration will continue on their social media channels with photos of artifacts representing 120 years of accessions, shared daily at 1:20pm.

MOV’s 120th anniversary is not only an acknowledgment of history, but of Vancouver’s history. As MOV CEO Nancy Noble explains, “In Canadian terms, we are an old museum with an old collection. For 120 years this museum has been the repository of the material culture and collective memory of this city. We are a reflection of Vancouver’s identity over time. That is valuable in and of itself.”

In 1894, a group of visionaries formed Vancouver’s Art, Historical and Scientific Association. Soon after, the City Museum was created at the Carnegie Library location at Main and Hastings. In 1967, the city announced the construction of the current landmark building in Vanier Park as part of Canada’s centennial. Designed by well-known architect Gerald Hamilton, the Museum’s distinctive dome top was inspired by the shape of a woven basket hat made by Northwest Coast First Nations people. In 1981, the Centennial Museum was re-named the Vancouver Museum and featured permanent displays, exhibitions and educational programs about the natural, cultural and human history of the Vancouver region.

Society continues to transform and museums have had to adapt to that change. In 2008, the Museum underwent a visioning process that resulted in a shift in focus, taking a cross-disciplinary approach and engaging the community in dialogue about contemporary issues of our city. To reflect the new vision, the Museum changed its name to the Museum of Vancouver in 2009.

“We don’t collect the way colonial collectors did, nor do we communicate information in the same way we did 120 years ago,” Noble explains. “As a contemporary museum, MOV wants to push the boundaries of our role. We believe that the power of history and collections bind the community together, but we want to go beyond that to engage our community in building our collections, telling their own stories, debating contemporary issues and hopefully shaping the future of Vancouver.”

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Media interested in a presentation of our standout artifacts representing 12 decades, and a tour of our 70,000 object collection or interviews with MOV CEO Nancy Noble, can contact Myles Constable (below) to make private appointments.

Media Contact

Myles Constable, Marketing Officer/Media Relations

mconstable@museumofvancouver.ca

Office: 604-730-5309

December 04, 2013
Rewilding Vancouver connects the city with its natural history

EARLY MEDIA RELEASE

December 2, 2013

 

Rewilding Vancouver connects the city with its natural history

 

(VANCOUVER, BC) – Vancouver is known for its connection to nature — a unique quality in a major urban centre. Despite this, our city has dramatically transformed the natural environment. Rewilding Vancouver, opening on February 27, 2014 at the Museum of Vancouver, explores Vancouver’s nature as it was, is, and could be.

Rewilding Vancouver is an act of remembering,” explains J.B. MacKinnon, curator of the exhibition and author of The 100-Mile Diet and the recently released The Once and Future World. “It offers a window into a forgotten history in order to look at the present and the possible future with new eyes.”

In 2010, for example, Vancouverites were mesmerized when a grey whale came for a swim in False Creek. Few were aware that, just 150 years ago, hundreds of whales visited local waters each year, including a resident population of humpback whales — famous for their haunting underwater songs. Rewilding Vancouver seeks to encourage people to discover such stories from Vancouver’s past as inspiration to imagine a wilder city today.

The first major exhibition on urban historical ecology in Canada, Rewilding Vancouver features 12 tableaux that mix taxidermy, material culture, projection and sound to reveal the natural “understory” of familiar Vancouver locations. An extinct Steller’s sea cow hovers over the Stanley Park Seawall and a coyote remembers Expo 86, while 120 km of former fish-bearing streams flow beneath our feet.

“Almost everyone has experienced the loss of some treasured natural space — whether an entire forest or a simple vacant lot,” says MacKinnon. “This exhibition is a way to connect with that feeling, and to explore the unlimited possibilities of melding the urban and wild.”

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The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization with the mandate to hold a mirror to the city and lead provocative conversations about its past, present and future.

 

Media Contact

Debbie Douez, Director of Marketing and Development

T: 604.730.5304

E: marketing@museumofvancouver.ca

October 16, 2013
Interesting Vancouver returns for a sixth year of sharing how the typical can actually be intriguing

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Click here for full speaker bios

Interesting Vancouver returns for a sixth year of sharing
how the typical can actually be intriguing

(VANCOUVER) – What makes someone interesting? Is it their stories? Their life experience? Maybe it’s their drag persona. Vancouverites can find out what makes 10 of their neighbours interesting on November 8 at the Museum of Vancouver when Interesting Vancouver returns for its sixth year.

Interesting Vancouver is an event that seeks to reveal the richness of Vancouver’s cultural DNA through stories exploring possibility, curiosity and adventure. Ten Vancouverites drawn from the city’s diverse and multi-disciplinary fields are selected to speak for 10 minutes each and answer questions from the audience. With no themes or agendas, it becomes a remarkable opportunity for the audience to also reflect on what’s interesting in their own lives.

“The thing I love most about Interesting Vancouver is that the only theme is ‘interesting’,” says Mark Busse. “No corporate overlords, no profit motives, no self-promotion. Just a room full of fascinating people sharing their hobbies, obsessions, and passions intended to expand the collective vision of what is uniquely possible in our city and by its citizens.”

In addition to speakers, guests will be invited to smash one of Meaghan Kennedy’s piñatas and be treated to a musical performance by CR Avery.

Speakers at the 2013 Interesting Vancouver include:

  • Steve Fisher, Founder and Experience Architect of The Republic of Quality who will share his story about faith, science, love, leaving religion, and the subsequent repercussions.
  • Lynn Hill, curator of Contemporary First Nations exhibitions will share her story of climbing the career ladder.
  • Stephane Mouttet, Chef Concierge of the Shangri-La Hotel on being reunited with his biological parents.
  • Yared Nigussu, Ethiopian artist on the risk of first impressions.
  • Meaghan Kennedy, Piñata Artist on how piñatas have changed her life.
  • Ken Tsui, pop-up event organizer on how Wu-Tang Clan’s debut album informed his understanding of the personal voice.
  • Dave “Peach Cobblah” Deveau, playwright, drag queen, event organizer on how necessity is the root of creativity.
  • Robert Rietveld, former army, navy, and air force executive on Canadian war heros.
  • CR Avery, musician on what it’s like to be a true East Vander.
     

For more information and ticket sales, please visit www.interestingvancouver.com and http://interestingvancouver2013.eventbrite.com. Tickets go on sale on October 16.

 

 

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Click here for full speaker bios

 

MEDIA CONTACT:

Amanda McCuaig

Marketing Officer, Museum of Vancouver

604.730.5309

amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

 

For additional information visit:

www.facebook.com/interestingvancouver

twitter.com/interestingvan

www.museumofvancouver.ca

 

About Interesting Vancouver

In 2011, the Museum of Vancouver became the official co-host and presenting venue. 2013 sponsors include Driftwood Beer, Prospect Winery, The Butler Did It, Eventbrite, MediaTemple, GDCBC, The Hot Charlottes, Industrial Brand, and Kirsti Wakelin.

Interesting Vancouver is an offshoot of Interesting, an event that takes place in cities worldwide and was founded by Russell Davies. Brett McFarlane founded Interesting Vancouver in 2008.

About the Museum of Vancouver
The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization with the mandate to hold a mirror to the city and lead provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.

 

 

 

September 25, 2013
MOV Announces 2013 City Shaper Awards Honourees: Ray Spaxman, MEC, and Tamara Vrooman

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 18, 2013

 

MOV Announces 2013 City Shaper Awards Honourees: Ray Spaxman, MEC, and Tamara Vrooman

 

(Vancouver, BC) — The Museum of Vancouver will present its City Shaper Awards to recipients Ray Spaxman, Mountain Equipment Co-Op, and Tamara Vrooman at the MOV Legacy Dinner, presented by Maynards, this upcoming Wednesday, October 2, 2013.

Honoured for his work as a visionary architect and city planner, Ray Spaxman will be taking home the MOV Legacy Award. “This award is a wonderful recognition of the city planning work undertaken in the ’70s and ’80s that led to the status Vancouver has come to enjoy in the world,” says Spaxman. “It is the result of the creative synergy between politicians, staff, and citizens in those two decades.”

The Livable City Award, being presented for its first time this year, will go to Mountain Equipment Co-Op for their pioneering business. “Vancouver gave rise to Mountain Equipment Co-op in 1971,” explains Shona McGlashan, representing Mountain Equipment Co-Op. “Since then, MEC has grown to become Canada’s most vibrant outdoor retailer … We are delighted to be recognized as a city shaper in the city that helped shape our identity.”

Finally, the 2013 Emerging City Visionary Award will be going to Tamara Vrooman, CEO of Vancity for her remarkable work. “I am honored to receive an award that supports a vision of everyone working together to meet the long-term needs of the community and the people who live and work in this city,” remarks Vrooman. “I’m truly excited about the future opportunities that will support us as we continue to create a city that is innovative, sustainable and inclusive.”

Recipients were chosen by a committee of city historians, urban planners, business and philanthropic influencers, and representatives of the MOV Board of Directors.

“At the MOV we see the city as a living artifact, and part of that is recognizing the work that has been done by people to make it what it is today,” explains Nancy Noble, Museum of Vancouver CEO. “In this second year of awards we’re really starting to see what incredible minds and initiative we have within our city, and we’re excited to be recognizing these three for their contributions to our city’s story.”

Taking place in the MOV’s landmark building in Vanier Park, the Legacy Dinner will offer guests an exclusive museum experience complete with live music, fine wine, and scrumptious food. Visit the MOV’s website at www.museumofvancouver.ca/legacydinner  to purchase tickets, for background on the honorees, and further details on how the awards were selected.

The Museum of Vancouver is thrilled to partner with Maynards Auctioneers on this year’s dinner and thanks them for their ongoing support.  Other sponsors include BDO, Prospect Winery, The Butler Did It Catering, and Lonsdale Rentals.

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The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization with the mandate to hold a mirror to the city and lead provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.

 

Media Contact

Amanda McCuaig, Marketing Officer

T: 604.730.5309    C : 604.312.8791

E: amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

 

About Ray Spaxman

Ray Spaxman, LL.D, ARIBA, MRTPI, FCIP, RPP, Hon AIBC; Architect

Ray is an architect and planner with over 50 years of experience in planning and urban design, with more accomplishments to his name than can be noted in this short description. During his time with the City of Vancouver he established public participation and community engagement in planning, helped in developing the City's View Protection Policies, and produced plans for Downtown, West End, False Creek, Granville Island, Kitsilano, Champlain Heights, Kensington, Southlands, and Fairview Slopes. Since then he has developed urban design projects both here and abroad, including Vancouver's High Building Policies.

 

About MEC

In 1971, a group of west coast mountaineers made a decision to do business differently, and they turned an unconventional retail model into a thriving business. Today, MEC is Canada's largest co-operative by membership and is the leading specialty retailer of outdoor clothing, gear, and accessories. MEC's purpose is to inspire and enable all Canadians to live active outdoor lifestyles.

 

About Tamara Vrooman

Tamara Vrooman; Chief Executive Officer, Vancity

As Chief Executive Officer of Canada's largest community credit union, Tamara Vrooman harnesses the strength of Vancity to fulfill its vision of redefining wealth for members and communities. Under Tamara's leadership, Vancity became the first carbon neutral credit union in North America, the first Canadian financial institution invited to join Global Alliance for Banking on Values (GABV), and the largest organization in Canada with a living wage policy.

 

 

September 05, 2013
Exhibition explores the “Buddha-like” Daniel Evan White and his distinct west coast architecture

EARLY MEDIA RELEASE

September 5, 2013

 

Exhibition explores the “Buddha-like” Daniel Evan White and his distinct west coast architecture

 

I had the impression of being in the presence of a private man, a man who had a Buddha-like quality and who made a house speak the way a Dylan Thomas poem makes a grown man weep or a Lawren Harris clean line painting evokes the grandeur of Canada.”

–Bruce Fraser, in his 2012 eulogy to Daniel Evan White

 

(VANCOUVER, BC) – While Arthur Erickson, Fred Hollingsworth, and Ron Thom garnered international fame, their contemporary – Vancouver born and raised Daniel Evan White – quietly broke boundaries while raising stunning houses amongst Vancouver’s rugged landscape. His visionary career now comes to life in Play House: The architecture of Daniel Evan White, opening October 16, 2013 at the Museum of Vancouver, giving Vancouverites the first glimpse of one of their most remarkable citizens.

“Dan’s work not so much fits its site as becomes one with it,” explains co-curator Greg Johnson. “His clever architectural innovations allowed his buildings to match their dramatic west coast sites.”

White was little known due to his tendency to avoid publicity, despite continual inquiries from magazines, journals, and scholars, and a loyal roster of customers who had him build for them again and again. His name may not ring instant bells, but chances are you’ll recognize some of the more than 100+ Vancouver residential projects he was involved in, 36 of which are highlighted in Play House.

Play House ventures through Daniel Evan White’s mind, hands, and eyes to explore the creative process that transforms the dream home from desire into reality.  The exhibition includes stories from clients and contractors, a replica of the Máté House built to 1:4 scale, projections, smaller models, 3D computer models, and an area where visitors can get hands on with some of Dan’s favourite geometric shapes.

“Dan was a very quiet, modest man,” explains Martin Lewis, Play House co-curator and former associate of White’s. “Those who worked with Dan saw him as an innovator of design. Some of Dan’s ideas were so unconventional at the time that they must have seemed like sheer folly. But now we see not only that they worked, but that they have withstood the test of time.”

The exhibition refreshes our ideas of the typical house and its functions, with each featured project becoming a commentary on contemporary culture, innovation, risk, and the idea of play. Yet again, the MOV strikes out to introduce Vancouverites to one of their own incredibly talented people.

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The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization with the mandate to hold a mirror to the city and lead provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.

Media Contact
Amanda McCuaig, Marketing Officer
T: 604.730.5309    C : 604.312.8791
E: amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca
 

July 09, 2013
MOV and partners to take over Granville Street in day of spectacular transformation and playful design

­­­MEDIA RELEASE
July 13, 2013

MOV and partners to take over Granville Street in day of spectacular transformation and playful design

(VANCOUVER, BC) — On Saturday, July 13 the Museum of Vancouver and its partners invite the public downtown, to help enliven and transform the 700 block of Granville Street using hundreds of super-sized polystyrene building blocks.

“MOV’s Upcycled Urbanism challenges Vancouverites to do more than just talk about urban design, public space, and environmental sustainability. It brings people together to build their ideas in the public realm—but just for one day,” says Charles Montgomery, Curatorial Associate at the Museum of Vancouver. “The project takes advantage of pioneering work by Langley-based Mansonville Plastics, which rescued polystyrene salvaged from the construction projects around the lower mainland and ground it down for use in new blocks. After our event, materials will be returned for a third round of recycling.”

The project was born from the common aspiration of UBC’s School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture (SALA), the Vancouver Public Space Network, Maker Faire Vancouver, Spacing Magazine, and the MOV to offer people new ways to re-imagine public design. Three  teams will use the blocks to create giant games, social machines, and art installations.

The public is invited to watch, encourage builders, and experience the interactive landscape at any time between 10:00am and 6:00pm. Orientations for anyone who wants to join a build team will be at 10:00am, 1:00pm, and 5:00pm.

“This project has been an exhilarating and productive challenge for SALA students,” says SALA lecturer Bill Pechet.  “They were asked to design beautiful block prototypes that anyone could use in construction. We’ll be putting the premise of the project and hundreds of these interlocking pieces to the test on July 13.”

People of all ages are welcome to participate. Register by emailing upcycledurbanism@museumofvancouver.ca

Upcycled Urbanism is a Museum of Vancouver initiative in partnership with the School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture (SALA) at the University of British Columbia, the Vancouver Public Space Network (VPSN), Maker Faire Vancouver, and Spacing Magazine, with generous additional support from SALA, Mansonville Plastics, and the Vancouver Foundation.

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The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization with the mandate to hold a mirror to the city and lead provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.

 

Media Contact

Amanda McCuaig, Marketing Officer

T: 604.730.5309    C : 604.312.8791

E: amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

April 25, 2013
Will the Museum of Vancouver be moving?

MEDIA RELEASE
APRIL 24, 2013

Will the Museum of Vancouver be moving?

Vancouver, BC — The Museum of Vancouver (MOV) has been taking deliberate steps towards securing its position as a thriving part of Vancouver’s cultural landscape for generations to come. Today the museum announced its commitment to find an optimal location that will complement its provocative, award-winning programs and exhibitions.

The MOV has occupied its current location in Vanier Park since 1967. While the location is picturesque it is not without its challenges. A study is being conducted by AldrichPears Associates (APA) to define a functional program for the Museum in an optimal scenario.

“We are constantly asked about our location,” said Nancy Noble, Museum of Vancouver’s CEO. “With this study we will finally have a definitive answer to the question ‘should we stay or should we go?’”

Through the study, the Museum is examining many options for its location, the current Vancouver Art Gallery space being only one. The functional program is informed by current operations, industry best-practices, the vision for the visitor experience at the Museum and the anticipated visitation levels at the current location as well as other locations throughout Vancouver.

Isaac Marshall, Principal at APA, said, “There are so many opportunities in Vancouver right now. It is the perfect time for the MOV to prove it is ready to lead the world in redefining the role of a city museum.”

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About the Museum of Vancouver
The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization with the mandate to hold a mirror up to the city and lead provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.
http://www.museumofvancouver.ca

Media Contact:
Amanda McCuaig
604-730-5309
amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

About AldrichPears Associates
AldrichPears Associates is a planning and design firm based in Vancouver, BC that provides interpretive planning and exhibit design services for cultural attractions around the world.
http://www.aldrichpears.com

Media Contact:
Elaine Edge
604-669-7044
marketing@aldrichpears.com

 

April 11, 2013
Museum of Vancouver first North American cultural institution to take augmented reality “to the streets”

MEDIA RELEASE
April 30, 2013

Museum of Vancouver first North American cultural institution to take augmented reality “to the streets”

The Visible City now available for iPhone and Android

Vancouver, BC, Canada – April 30, 2013 – Today the Museum of Vancouver (MOV) launches the Visible City, a virtual exhibition of Vancouver’s neon history, developed in partnership with the Virtual Museum of Canada (VMC) at virtualmuseum.ca, an initiative of the Department of Canadian Heritage. In doing so it becomes the first cultural institution in North America to have taken augmented reality technology to the streets.

The Visible City is a free app and virtual exhibition that allows users to discover the rise, fall and revival of neon in Vancouver. The app provides walking tours of Vancouver’s most colorful neighborhoods and users can actively contribute to the history of 57 of Vancouver’s neon signs by uploading their own stories, sharing them with others and voting on their favorite signs and places.

At the MOV, we consider the entire city our artifact, and the Visible City is one of those ways we can take history beyond the walls of the Museum,” explains Hanna Cho, MOV Curator of Audience Engagement. “The app is like taking a piece of Vancouver’s history around with you in your pocket – but it’s a piece of history that you can actively contribute to.”

Users can explore two digitally guided walking tours through Vancouver’s cultural heart (Granville Street) and the city’s original downtown hub (Chinatown and Hastings Street). By holding their cameras up to the present day scene, they can see the same Vancouver location appear as it did in the 1950s, 60s or 70s. Users can then listen to over 40 pre-curated stories on audio and video told by  celebrated Vancouverites like Dal Richards (big band musician), Joe Keithley (of DOA), Judy Graves (City of Vancouver advocate for the homeless) and more.

The Visible City is free to download and is available via the iTunes App Store and Google Play. The Visible City gratefully acknowledges the funding support of the VMC at www.virtualmuseum.ca, an initiative of the Department of Canadian Heritage. For more information visit www.museumofvancouver.ca/visiblecity

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The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization with the mandate to hold a mirror to the city and lead provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.

Media Contact
Amanda McCuaig, Marketing Officer
T: 604.730.5309    C : 604.312.8791
E: amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

March 27, 2013
Foncie Pulice, Vancouver’s most prolific street photographer, in retrospective at Museum of Vancouver

MEDIA RELEASE
March 27, 2013

Foncie Pulice, Vancouver’s most prolific street photographer, in retrospective at Museum of Vancouver

(VANCOUVER, BC) –Taking thousands of photos each year and about 15 million photos over his lifetime, Foncie Pulice was Vancouver’s most prolific and beloved street photographer. Many long-time Vancouver families have Foncie photos in their albums – and the stories to go with them. Foncie’s Fotos: Man on the Street, opening at the Museum of Vancouver on June 6, 2013, reveals the life and workstyle of this Vancouver photographer.

Foncie Pulice shot from locations along Granville and Hastings for almost 40 years. He photographed without discrimination, capturing the full range of ages, ethnicities, and classes that thronged downtown. At a time when personal cameras were rare and family portraits were expensive, Foncie sometimes created the only surviving image of a family member.

“Foncie captured people in motion, literally in mid-stride, stepping with energy into Vancouver’s future,” explains Joan Siedl, exhibition curator. “His camera lens was fixed at about waist height and pointing slightly up, so that everyone appears slightly larger than life, commanding their patch of sidewalk for an instant.”

Foncie claimed that he destroyed all of his negatives, but he did not. The exhibition will include projected images from a surviving reel of over 10,000 negatives shot in May and June 1968 on Granville near Robson. If you happened to walk south on the east side of the 700 block of Granville Street that spring, Foncie may have taken your photo as you passed.

Foncie’s camera, which he donated to the Museum when he retired in 1979, is a gimcrack assemblage of war surplus metal plate on wheels decorated with a red plastic lightening bolt. Its flash was powered by a car battery. The camera used large reels of movie film so that Foncie could shoot for hours on end.

The exhibition has worked in collaboration with the Knowledge Network, which is producing shorts about Foncie that will be shown in the exhibition, as well as a feature documentary that will premiere later in the year. Those with photo taken by Foncie are encouraged to upload and share via “Foncie’s Corner” on the Knowledge Network (fonciescorner.knowledge.ca).  

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The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization with the mandate to hold a mirror to the city and lead provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.

Media Contact
Amanda McCuaig, Marketing Officer
T: 604.730.5309    C : 604.312.8791
E: amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

January 17, 2013
Winter Wander celebrates Vanier Park, a Vancouver hidden treasure

For Immediate Release
January 17, 2013

Winter Wander celebrates Vanier Park, a Vancouver hidden treasure

(Vancouver, BC) – The six cultural institutions of Vanier Park are celebrating their Kitsilano location again during their second Winter Wander. Vancouverites are invited to attend all locations on Saturday, January 26, for one significantly reduced rate.

“We had such a wonderful turn out at our first Winter Wander that we’ve been looking forward to doing it again all year,” says Simon Robinson, Executive Director of the Vancouver Maritime Museum “For us, it’s a great way to showcase what’s down here in Vanier Park, and to work together as institutions. This park and its venues are truly a Vancouver treasure.”

Vanier Park is home to the Vancouver Maritime Museum, the Museum of Vancouver, the H.R. MacMillan Space Centre, Bard on the Beach, the Vancouver Academy of Music, and the City of Vancouver Archives.

The Winter Wander in Vanier Park is a one day event in which Vancouverites and their families can enjoy a taste of what Vanier Park’s cultural institutions have to offer for one rate that includes admission to all venues. Adult admission will be just $5 to visit all locations, and children 16 and under will visit for free.

“When the Royal Canadian Air Force station that occupied this area was decommissioned in the 1960’s the Vancouver Parks Board took over management of the land,” explains Robinson. “This enabled the space to become public park land and a cultural hub. It's very unique, but sometimes overlooked. Adjacent to the downtown heart of our city, today it’s a place where Vancouverite’s can spend the day enjoying the beauty of the park, visiting museums, taking in a play, discovering music, or learning about Vancouver’s history.”

In addition to visiting the museums, Winter Wanderers will be able to enjoy a talk by Christopher Gaze of Bard on the Beach, performances by Vancouver Academy of Music students, and visiting food trucks.

For full schedule of events, visit www.museumofvancouver/winterwander.

The Winter Wander is supported by Port Metro Vancouver.

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For media inquiries contact:
Amanda McCuaig
Marketing Officer, Museum of Vancouver
604-730-5309
amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

January 08, 2013
Talking Sex in Vancouver - New Exhibition at the MOV

MEDIA RELEASE
January 8, 2013

Talking Sex in Vancouver
Museum of Vancouver tackles taboo subject by exploring its cultural history

(VANCOUVER, BC) – What better to do on Valentine’s Day, than throw open the doors to an exhibition dedicated to Vancouver’s sexual history? Sex Talk in the City, the Museum of Vancouver’s newest exhibition, opens February 14, 2013, and will give visitors a chance to consider how sexuality is not only biological, but also cultural and political. 

Moving from the classroom, to the bedroom, to the streets, Sex Talk in the City explores how sexuality is learned (at school, in the media, through popular culture) and how these conversations have impacted the way people self-identify and relate to each other.

“Exploring what people in Vancouver think about sex becomes a telling way to know the city,” explains Viviane Gosselin, Sex Talk’s curatorial lead. “Looking at Vancouver’s sexual history has enabled us to see that many people in the city have challenged the sexual norms of their time — whether it is on issues of contraception, gay rights, or the ergonomics of sex toys — to create communities that are more inclusive and educated.”

The exhibition shares stories ranging from early sex education in Vancouver, to political movements that began at our local universities, to the local origin of the iconic black cougar logo that for decades warned movie audiences about sexually explicit content. It also touches on issues of sex trade work, the role of the Internet as “sex educator” to many children, and how the pleasure of belonging can be as important as pleasure itself.

In the collaborative style that Gosselin brought to the award-winning Bhangra.me exhibition, Sex Talk in the City was created with an advisory panel of 17 people, and a team that included the design studio Propellor, a writer, filmmaker, and several historians.

“Working with a large advisory committee has played a crucial role in this project,” says Gosselin. “Committee members stressed the importance of featuring diverse perspectives while highlighting concerns that are often shared across age, gender, ethnicity and sexual orientation.”

Sex Talk in the City is a unique opportunity to reflect on personal ideas about sexuality (where they came from, the values that shaped them, and how they help or impede our ability to live a healthy sexual life) in a safe, fun, and interesting environment. Visitors are sure to leave wanting to share their own quirky stories about their first time, their sex ed class experience, or the awkward birds and bees conversation they had with their parents.

The creation of Sex Talk in the City involved the participation of Options for Sexual Health, the Vancouver Queer Film Festival, the Vancouver School Board, public health experts, activists, sexologists, educators, youth, and historians.

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Large format images of Sex Talk in the City and related artifacts are available on request.

The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization with the mandate to hold a mirror to the city and lead provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.

Media Contact
Amanda McCuaig, Marketing Officer
T: 604.730.5309    C : 604.312.8791
E: amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

November 06, 2012
Museum of Vancouver launches retail collection around the city

Media Release
November 6, 2012

Museum of Vancouver launches retail collection around the city

Vancouver (BC) — The Museum of Vancouver (MOV) has partnered with local businesses to breathe new life into artifacts and make them available for culture lovers to take history home with them via a new retail collection.

In an initiative that goes beyond the traditional approach of cultural institutions of hosting a gift shop on location, the MOV has created a model that works directly with local retailers to produce and stock items inspired by the MOV collection.

“This new model is a great way to take the MOV brand and our array of historical artifacts out to the city,” says Kate Follington, Director of Development at the MOV. “Given that we can only ever display a fraction of our collection, it is a way for us to breathe new life into artifacts and raise funds to continue our work.”

The project sees the MOV working with multiple Vancouver businesses, including Harvey Burritt’s 2nd Century Rug Company, Country Furniture, Cascade Room Restaurant & Bar, Walrus, Make Vancouver, Vancouver Special, Bookmark at the Vancouver Public Library, London Drugs, and Murchie’s Teas.

“When the MOV approached us to be part of the program, we jumped at the opportunity,” says Harvey Burritt of 2nd Century Rug Company. “We are known for our ability to create high quality, custom area rugs from items that are meaningful to our clients. We have applied this ability to the treasure trove of MOV’s collection. I can’t think of a better way for my family to support one of our city’s cultural institutions.”

In addition to the rugs, products include keychains, coasters, T-shirts, pillows, beer glasses, and a specially concocted Smilin’ Buddha tea from Murchie’s. Each product comes with a history of the original artifact and a catalogue number so that buyers can look the artifact up on openMOV (openmov.museumofvancouver.ca). Products and locations can be found online at www.museumofvancouver.ca/retail .

The retail line is part of a project supported by the Vancity Social Enterprise Portfolio and is being developed as an alternative line of revenue for the MOV. Funds raised through the retail initiative will benefit MOV’s special exhibitions and its school programs that reach 10,000 elementary school students annually.

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The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization which holds a mirror to the city and leads provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.

Media Contact
Amanda McCuaig, Marketing Officer
T: 604.730.5309    C : 604.312.8791
E: amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

October 04, 2012
The Museum of Vancouver Honours Robert Fung and the Wong Family as Vancouver City Shapers

MEDIA RELEASE
October 4, 2012

The Museum of Vancouver Honours Robert Fung and the Wong Family as Vancouver City Shapers

(VANCOUVER, BC) If the city itself is looked at as an artifact, to whom do we credit its creation? The Museum of Vancouver — in its ongoing mission to hold a mirror to the city and provoke dialogue about its past, present, and future — has responded to this question with a new award. The first inaugural Vancouver City Shapers Award will be presented on Wednesday, October 11, at the MOV Legacy Dinner.

Uniquely positioned to look at the entire city as an artifact, the MOV pulled seven well recognized city historians, urban planners, influencers in the business and philanthropic sector, as well as representatives from the MOV Board of Directors to select recipients for two new awards. They spent two months reviewing over 50 families and individuals who have helped to mould the city as we know it today, and who continue to influence its path to tomorrow.

The resulting selection brought forward three extraordinary individuals for this inaugural year:

City Legacy Award:                                      Milton and Fei Wong
Emerging City Visionary Award:                Robert Fung

The City Legacy Award acknowledges Milton and Fei’s extraordinary contribution and influence over the city’s celebration of diversity, academic success, and mentorship of business innovators and new entrepreneurs.

“They touched so many sectors in Vancouver with their idealism and leadership, from finance and philanthropy to diversity and culture,” explains Nancy Noble, Museum of Vancouver CEO. “Their legacy is our harmonious and diverse city.”

The Emerging City Visionary Award recognizes individuals shaping Vancouver for tomorrow. Salient Group partner and developer Robert Fung will receive this award for his successful preservation and revitalization of Gastown.

The Museum of Vancouver’ City Shapers Award legacy dinner will be an ongoing annual award.

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The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization which holds a mirror to the city and leads provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.

For full background on selection committee and criteria, download the PDF.

Media Contact
Amanda McCuaig, Marketing Officer
T: 604.730.5309    C : 604.312.8791
E: amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

October 03, 2012
Giant Dice Portrait Pays Homage to Vancouver Artist

Media Release
October 3, 2012

Giant Dice Portrait Pays Homage to Vancouver Artist

Vancouver (BC) — There are few better ways to pay homage to an artist/designer than to create a portrait made of the same number of dice as the days they lived. Frederick McSwain, a friend of Tobias Wong’s, did just that, creating one of the world’s largest dice portraits using 13,138 die.

Now accompanying the exhibition Object (ing): the art/design of Tobias Wong, at the Museum of Vancouver, McSwain’s piece “DIE” is a tribute to Wong, a Vancouver/New York artist who passed away unexpectedly at the age of 35 in early 2010.

 “The idea of a die itself was appropriate—the randomness of life,” explains Frederick McSwain, who produced the dice portrait for NY Design Week, 2011. “It felt like a medium he would use. The idea of every decision you make and everything you’ve done in your life defines who you are. All of those days symbolically make up the image of Tobi.”

The medium was chosen from an exchange McSwain once witnessed — a stranger approached Wong to ask for a cigarette, and Wong accepted a cheap six-sided die in exchange.

The portrait also pays homage to Wong’s own style of conceptual art/design. Wong was well known in New York as a provocative artist, re-designing every-day objects and making poignant statements about the world around him.

The dice were organized into individual sheets of 361 pieces and then laid to rest free on the floor without adhesive. A time lapse video of the piece being assembled can be seen online.  

US Furniture giant Bernhardt Designs bought the piece in 2011 and is currently touring it across North America. The portrait will be on display at the Museum of Vancouver until the end of October.

The exhibition Object(ing) at the Museum of Vancouver is the first major showing of Tobias Wong’s body of work. Since opening on September 19, it has received public accolades from the likes of Douglas Coupland and Jason Heard (show director of IDS West). Wong himself has been referred to as one of more influential and provocative designers of his generation.

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The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization which holds a mirror to the city and leads provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.

Media Contact
Amanda McCuaig, Marketing Officer
T: 604.730.5309    C : 604.312.8791
E: amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

August 17, 2012
Interesting Vancouver returns to reveal the passions of eight interesting Vancouverites

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Interesting Vancouver returns to reveal the passions of eight interesting Vancouverites

(VANCOUVER) – Interesting Vancouverites from various walks of life will be sharing personal stories at the fifth annual Interesting Vancouver on Friday, September 28 at the Museum of Vancouver from 7:00pm to 10:00pm.

Interesting Vancouver is a conference that seeks to reveal the richness of Vancouver’s cultural DNA through stories exploring possibility, curiosity and adventure. In 2011, the Museum of Vancouver became the official co-host and presenting venue. There are no corporate sponsors, themes or agendas. The format is the same every year: eight Vancouverites drawn from the city’s diverse and multi-disciplinary fields are selected to speak for 15 minutes each and answer questions from the audience.

“The vision for Interesting Vancouver is to give smart and dynamic people the opportunity to share their close kept passions and stories with an audience of curious minds,” says Lauren Isaacson, conference organizer and Senior Researcher and Analyst at Motion Canada. “We hope to spark conversation, interest, and investigation about new topics, events, and people, and for attendees to walk away with new ideas and inspiration to make their own lives a little more interesting.”

“Partnering with groups like Interesting Vancouver is exactly how the MOV aims to catalyze meaningful, interdisciplinary, and socially rich experiences for Vancouverites, and break down cultural and civic silos in the city”, adds Hanna Cho, Curator of Engagement & Dialogue at the MOV. “It’s amazing for us to be able to connect with such a fantastic and creative group of volunteer organizers, and we can’t wait to see what’s ahead as we continue to grow together.”

Interesting Vancouver 2012 with the Museum of Vancouver has curated a selection of speakers:

  • Ron Skewchuck, a Public Relations guru who is also an international BBQ champion;
  • Roy White, a successful international designer who found an avocation in middle age as a dancer;
  • Lloyd Bernhardt, a software developer who turned Ethical Bean coffee guru as a result of adopting a child in Guatemala;
  • Boris Mann, a tech entrepreneur who spent a year sailing a tall ship;
  • Aamer Haleem, co-host for CTV Morning Live who has interviewed celebrities such as George Clooney and Madonna, and covered international events such as Hurricane Katrina and the Concert for Diana;
  • Tori Holmes, the youngest women to row an ocean -- as a novice -- and live to write about it;
  • Corinne Lea, an artist turned business woman who successfully fought city hall at the Rio Theatre;
  • Toby Barazzuol, who spent his childhood in the Stanley Park Teahouse, became an entrepreneur, and then found a vocation restoring buildings and supporting community in the Downtown Eastside.

Driftwood Beer returns as the 2012 sponsor, and is joined by Mark Anthony Wines, Field Notes and Eventbrite.

For more information and ticket sales, please visit www.interestingvancouver.com and http://interestingvancouver2012.eventbrite.com/. Tickets go on sale on September 3.

Interesting Vancouver is an offshoot of Interesting, an event that takes place in cities worldwide and was founded by Russell Davies. Brett McFarlane founded Interesting Vancouver in 2008.

Other links:

https://www.facebook.com/interestingvancouver

https://twitter.com/interestingvan

www.museumofvancouver.ca

 

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MEDIA CONTACTS:

Kathleen Mazzocco                                         Amanda McCuaig
km@clearpr.com                                             Marketing Officer, Museum of Vancouver
604.563.2529                                                  604.730.5309
                                                                        amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

July 23, 2012
Tobias Wong’s cheeky art/design comes home

MEDIA RELEASE
July 23, 2012

Tobias Wong’s clever art/design comes home
Museum of Vancouver to hold first solo exhibition of the forerunner of conceptual design

 

(VANCOUVER, BC) – Opening this September 20, 2012, the Museum of Vancouver (MOV) is pleased to present the first time solo exhibition of internationally acclaimed, Vancouver-born artist, Tobias Wong in Object(ing): The art/design of Tobias Wong.

Wong has been lauded as “contemporary design’s most nimble provocateur” by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and is considered a forerunner of conceptual design. He appropriated, manipulated, manufactured, mass-produced, and re-issued everyday objects — from candies and dollar bills to box cutters and neon signs — pouring new meanings into them in the process. Like many pioneers, his art both seduced and upset.

“Tobias’ work and artistic trajectory are fascinating,” explains Viviane Gosselin, senior curator and project lead at the MOV. “I view Tobias as a poet who didn’t play with words but with objects; most of the time, familiar ones. He took the mundane, the utilitarian, and turned it into incredible sculptures. People ‘get it’ because it’s funny or it connects to popular culture and current events. However, more deeply considered, you can see all these clever references to the history of art/design.”

Although Wong was a ‘Vancouver boy’, his work is better known internationally than in his hometown. Leaving when he was 20 to study architecture in Toronto, he eventually moved to NYC to attend the sculpture program at the prestigious Cooper Union School of Art in 1998. His career soon took off in a big way provoking responses from globally recognized designers like Alessi, Philippe Starck and Karim Rashid and brands including Burberry. Wong kept close ties with friends, family, and collaborators in Vancouver. He came back regularly and worked with people here.

The show will feature over 50 pieces, including well known items like Bulletproof Quilted Duvet, the Ottoman, the “I Want to Change the World” book, and This is a Lamp. Some items have been re-issued specifically for this project (based on documentation and assistance of original collaborators). Reissuing works will allow new audiences to see pieces like Room Partition, the Anus sign that hung in the window of his East Village apartment, Chocolate Wood produced in collaboration with Chocolate Arts , and a series of candies created for Papabubble, a high end candy store based in NYC.

Wong passed away suddenly in 2010 at age 35 in his home in New York City. The MOV has been incredibly fortunate to work with close friends, collaborators, family and guest curator and project instigator Todd Falkowsky in making this exhibition a reality. The exhibition has mobilized the participation of over 50 collectors, curators, and artists from Vancouver, NYC, San Francisco, UK, and elsewhere, including pop culture commentator and artist Douglas Coupland and senior curator of design from the Museum of Modern Art, New York, Paola Antonelli.

"I no longer worry about what title people give me,
I’m happy being whatever fits the context.
I don’t draft or create models/prototypes,
I don’t problem solve,
and I definitely don’t make things to make life easier."
— Tobias Wong

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Large format images of Tobias Wong and his work are available on request.

The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization which holds a mirror to the city and leads provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.

Media Contact
Amanda McCuaig, Marketing Officer
T: 604.730.5309
E: amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

June 10, 2012
One year later – Stanley Cup riot boards from downtown windows go on display at MOV

MEDIA RELEASE
June 4, 2012

One year later – Stanley Cup riot boards from downtown
windows go on display at MOV

(VANCOUVER, BC) – A year after the Stanley Cup Riots of June 15, 2011, the Museum of Vancouver will open Reading the Riot Boards, a small exhibition displaying 15 of the plywood panels used to board up broken windows in downtown.

Boards on display include selections from the windows of the Bay. The exhibition will run from June 15 to September 23, 2012.

For the opening of this small MOV Studio exhbiition, the MOV invites the public to join in dialogue with Vancouver playwright Kevin Loring, City Councillor Andrea Reimer, and photographer Maurice Li in a multi-faceted examination of how the riots altered our collective conscience, spurred new civic conversations, and changed how Vancouverites see themselves and each other.  That is, we invite you to pause, reflect, and share in a discussion that asks: “Is this Vancouver?”

The roundtable will include a visual street-view storytelling of events by Maurice Li, excerpts from “The Thin Veneer” a play written as Loring’s response to the riots, and policy insights from Councillor Reimer.  A moderated Q&A and closer look at selected boards installed in the MOV Studio will follow.

The event is by donation (suggested $5-10, none turned away for lack of funds) | MOV Members free. RSVP online: http://riotreflections.eventbrite.com

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The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization which holds a mirror to the city and leads provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.

Media Contact
Amanda McCuaig, Marketing Officer
T: 604.730.5309
E: amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

About the Speakers:
Kevin Loring is the recipient of the 2009 Governor General’s Award in Drama. "The Thin Veneer" is Loring's response to the 2011 Stanley Cup riot. This profoundly beautiful play investigates who we are as Vancouverites.

Andrea Reimer was elected to Vancouver City Council in 2008. Her appointments include Chair, Standing Committee on Planning and Environment; Greenest City Action Team; Vancouver Economic Development Commission. Andrea is a fourth generation British Columbian who lives right across from her father’s family home at Trout Lake on Vancouver’s east side.

Maurice Li is a Vancouver-based photographer and visual storyteller.  Maurice’s work is informed by his passion for commercial, documentary, and fine art work that focuses on the urban form, cultural narrative, and experiential travel.

May 29, 2012
Young Makers’ Workshops prep kids for MakerFaire Vancouver

MEDIA ALERT
May 29, 2012

Young Makers’ Workshops prep kids for MakerFaire Vancouver

June 16, 2012 10:00am to 5:00pm at the Museum of Vancouver

If you have a young family member aged 13–18 who loves to create and get hands-on, then Young Makers Day is an excellent opportunity for them to build and to introduce them to a community of “Makers” — creative folks who range from tech enthusiasts to crafters, educators, tinkerers, hobbyists, engineers, artists, science clubs, students, authors, and commercial exhibitors.

Participants will become part of Maker Faire, a family-friendly showcase of invention, creativity, and resourcefulness. Come to the Young Makers Day at the Museum of Vancouver to make a cool team project to show-and-tell at Vancouver Mini Maker Faire to be held June 23 and 24 at the PNE!   

At the MOV your young maker can:

  • Create a giant ugly creature
  • Build paper and PVC pipe lanterns lit with LED lights
  • Hack a spray paint can to make virtual graffiti

Young Makers will work with an expert Maker from the community to learn how to manipulate materials, foster creativity and collaboration, inspire other makers, and grow the Maker Movement.  AND participants get to attend Vancouver Mini Maker Faire on June 23 and 24 as a featured Makers to show-off their team’s project.  How cool is that?  Participants become a Maker in just one day! 

Registration is limited and includes all food and material costs for the day. For more information or to register online, visit http://youngmakersvancouver.eventbrite.com .

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The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization which holds a mirror to the city and leads provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.

Media Contact
Amanda McCuaig, Marketing Officer                      Arielle Fraser, Education Liaison Maker Faire
T: 604.730.5309                                                         T: 778.883.8525
E: amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca                 E: Arielle@makerfaire.ca

May 23, 2012
Petroglyph to return to Secwepemc traditional territory from Museum of Vancouver

MEDIA RELEASE
May 23, 2012

 

Petroglyph to return to Secwepemc traditional territory from Museum of Vancouver

(VANCOUVER, BC) – A petroglyph rock that has been in Vancouver since 1926 will be returning to its home with the Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation (formerly Canoe Creek Indian Band) on June 13, 2012.

A blessing ceremony of the petroglyph will take place June 11 at the Museum of Vancouver with Chief Hank Adam of the Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation prior to the petroglyph’s historic journey of repatriation back to Secwepemc traditional territory west of Clinton, BC.  Members of the Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation and the MOV will be joined by Vancouver Mayor, Williams Lake Mayor, the Chair of the Cariboo Regional District, and members of Vancouver City Council.

"It’s been 86 years since the petroglyph rock was taken without our consent from our traditional area,” says Hank Adam, Chief of the Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation. “For Stswecemc/ Xgat'tem it means a sense of empowerment for us to finally have a voice as to the future of this sacred petroglyph rock. It is an exciting time for our community. We look forward to the rock’s journey home."

The boulder, measuring approximately three by five feet and weighing about six tons, was found on the east bank of the Fraser River near Crowe’s Bar back in 1926 by prospector H.S. Brown.  Brown brought the petroglyph to the attention of Park Board chair W.C. Shelly who arranged for its move to Stanley Park in Vancouver.  It took a team of 10 horses a month to drag the boulder from the sandbar along the Fraser up the 3,000 foot ascent to the railhead near Clinton. After years of being in Stanley Park in an unsheltered area where it was subject to vandalism, the Park Board and the Museum agreed to donate and move the rock to MOV in 1992.

In 2010, MOV curatorial staff and its Collections Committee began to explore repatriation of the petroglyph. It was determined to have come from the Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation. In August 2011, members of the First Nation and MOV staff visited the original site of the boulder and began planning for repatriation.

“We were powerfully moved last year when Chief Adam and our friends at Canoe Creek took us to the exact spot where the rock had stood,” explained Joan Seidl, Director of Collections and Exhibitions at the MOV. “It is a timeless place that has endured despite the sadness of the great rock’s removal. The Museum of Vancouver looks forward to working with the Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation to bring the petroglyph home and to the joy that it will bring to all involved.”

After consultation with its people about where the petroglyph should rest after its return, the Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation has decided to place the petroglyph in Churn Creek Protected Area upon its return on June 13, 2012.

A documentary film is being made about the repatriation, and everyone is invited to follow the journey of the petroglyph at www.facebook.com/storyofarock .

As part of its ongoing support of the Museum of Vancouver’s First Nation Collection, Vancouver Airport Authority is pleased to support the repatriation of this significant petroglyph to the Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation.

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Hank Adam and Joan Seidl are available for interview upon request.

Photos of the summer 2011 visit to Crow's Bar and of the petroglyph available upon request.

Media Contacts

Amanda McCuaig, MOV Marketing Officer
T: 604.730.5309
E: amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

Agness Jack, Communications, Northern Shuswap Tribal Council
T: 250-392-7361
E: A.Jack@nstq.org

 

About Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation
For more visit: www.canoecreekband.ca

About the Museum of Vancouver
The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization which holds a mirror to the city and leads provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.

May 07, 2012
Museum of Vancouver receives second Canadian Museum Association Award of Excellence in three years

MEDIA RELEASE
May 4, 2012

Museum of Vancouver receives second Canadian Museum Association Award of Excellence in three years

 

(VANCOUVER, BC) – Vancouver has one more thing to boast about this spring as its civic museum, the Museum of Vancouver, brings home its second Canadian Museum Association award in just three years.

The MOV — which rebranded and refocused its vision in 2009 and won the Award for Outstanding Achievement in Management in 2010 as a result — used that forward momentum to develop the multi-faceted and highly collaborative exhibition called Bhangra.me, which ran from May 5, 2011 to January 1, 2012. Last week at the Canadian Museum Association annual awards night, the team behind Bhangra.me was awarded Outstanding Achievement for best project in the Education Category.

Bhangra.me followed the MOV’s new model of telling Vancouver focused stories, and was a robust educational program designed to examine bhangra music as a cultural, artistic, and political phenomenon in Vancouver. It was comprised of original research and collections of costumes, instruments, interviews, a temporary exhibition, musical concerts, public programming, and interactive social technologies. It was completed in collaboration with the Vancouver International Bhangra Celebration Society (VIBC).

Vancouverites can still see a slideshow of the exhibition, related photos and videos on the Museum of Vancouver’s website (www.museumofvancouver.ca).

The MOV will continue to bring Vancouver innovative, contemporary, and sometimes contentious exhibitions. This fall we’ll house the first solo exhibition of the recently deceased artist/designer Tobias Wong in, followed by an educational exploration of all things sex in Sex Talk in the City, opening in 2013.

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The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization which holds a mirror to the city and leads provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.

 

Media Contact
Amanda McCuaig, Marketing Officer
T: 604.730.5309
E: amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

 

April 16, 2012
High Tea @ MOV mixes tea tasting with fund raising for a special Mother’s Day event

MEDIA RELEASE
April 16, 2012

High Tea @ MOV mixes tea tasting with fund raising for a special Mother’s Day event

(VANCOUVER, BC) – This upcoming Mother’s Day weekend, the Museum of Vancouver mixes learning, fashion, and tea for “High Tea @ MOV”, a special fundraiser for the museum. Whether guests come as friends or as a mother/child pair, they are sure to enjoy this delightful afternoon celebrating their bond during this special sit-down tea service.

Special guest speaker Brendan Waye, an accredited tea specialist known as “The Tea Guy” and tea sommelier program instructor from Vancouver Community College, will provide insight on the traditions and rituals of high tea culture over time.

Guests will enjoy a variety of teas and a delicious assortment of petite sandwiches and cakes. A guided tour of the Art Deco Chic exhibition will provide a base for conversations, and tea demonstrations will provide guests an opportunity to discover new tastes while learning about teas from around the world.

Date:                     Saturday, May 12, 2012
Doors Open:      2:00PM
Concludes:         5:00PM
Cost:                      Individual $40 | Two People $60
Where to buy: http://highteamov.eventbrite.com

All money raised will go towards the Museum of Vancouver’s programs for conserving Vancouver’s history and material items.

Special thanks to our sponsors Herbal Republic, Bernardin, Salt Spring Coffee, and Angela James.

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The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization which holds a mirror to the city and leads provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.

Media Contact
Amanda McCuaig, Marketing Officer
T: 604.730.5309
E: amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

March 20, 2012
The Maraya Project and Veda Hille come together for an exploration of Vancouver’s False Creek

MEDIA RELEASE
March 20, 2012

The Maraya Project and Veda Hille come together for an exploration of Vancouver’s False Creek

(VANCOUVER, BC) – Vancouver’s False Creek has a fascinating history, and its most recent development is explored in an MOV Studio Exhibition now on display called the Maraya Project:  Waterfronts of Vancouver and Dubai. False Creek mythology and history will be further explored in an intimate performance on Friday, March 30, featuring local folk musician and city singer, Veda Hille, accompanied by a visual narrative by Annabel Vaughan (architect and city thinker).

Through Songs of False Creek Flats: Reflections, Veda and Annabel use music, talk, and pictures to animate an area of the city that currently lies primarily dormant. Audience members will be given a hand-drawn artist map in order to take themselves on a local walk through the flats at their leisure.

Date:                     Friday, March 30, 2012
Doors:                   6:30PM
Performance:    7:30PM
Cost:                      MOV Members $15 | General Admission $17 | Student rate $10 (*with valid ID)
Where to buy: http://falsecreeksongs.eventbrite.com

*music and reception to follow

Through photography, video, public art, public programs and an interactive online platform, the Maraya Project explores new forms of urban living pioneered in both countries, showing how we are connected in ways that are both familiar and surprising. Maraya — from the Arabic m’raya for “mirror” or “reflection” — connects the glass and steel residential towers that line the seawall walkways of Emaar’s Dubai Marina and Concord Pacific Place along False Creek, looking at these two cities that are leaders of 21st century urbanism.

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The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization which holds a mirror to the city and leads provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.

Media Contact
Amanda McCuaig, Marketing Officer
T: 604.730.5309
E: amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

January 19, 2012
Extravagant glamour between the wars - Art Deco Chic opening at the MOV

Extravagant glamour between the wars
Museum of Vancouver to exhibit Art Deco women’s fashions from the 1920s and 1930s

(VANCOUVER, BC) – The design style known as art deco began in Paris in the 1920s and quickly gained worldwide popularity. Here in Vancouver, we see the art deco’s geometry-inspired style captured in the architecture of the Marine Building and the Burrard Street Bridge. Starting March 8, the public can also see it captured in women’s fashions of the 1920s and 1930s on display in Art Deco Chic: Extravagant glamour between the wars at the Museum of Vancouver.

“The garments chosen for exhibition have been selected because of their beauty and fine quality,” explains guest co-curator Ivan Sayers. “Some of the most important fashion designers in the world in the 1920s and 1930s will be represented.”

The fashion design of the era was a distinct departure from previous design styles. Drawing inspiration from geometric shapes to evoke elegance and modernity, it was also influenced by an increased ability to travel world wide – bringing inspiration not only from modernism, but from faraway places such as Russia, Egypt, and Mexico.

Visitors will enjoy more than 66 garments on display in this exhibition.

Notable Vancouver items include a black beaded gown worn to the opening of the Commodore Cabaret in 1929 and a red and gold lamé evening dress made from fabric depicting the battles of the Trojan War. Many items on show are exquisite designer dresses with labels such as Chanel, Lanvin, Vionnet, Patou, and Schiaparelli. To contrast these high fashion items is a piece from the MOV’s collection – a modest, yet stylish, navy polka dot dress made by the Aurora Dress Company of Vancouver around 1927.

The garments and accessories on display come from the private collections of Ivan Sayers and Claus Jahnke, as well as from the MOV and other’s collections. Handbags, hats, shoes, and jewelry will further illustrate the use of geometric shapes to create sleek, sophisticated designs.

November 16, 2011
Winter Wander celebrates Vanier Park, a Vancouver hidden treasure

For Immediate Release
November 16, 2011

Type: Community Event / Family Day

Winter Wander celebrates Vanier Park, a Vancouver hidden treasure

(Vancouver, BC) – Vanier Park is a cultural hub that many Vancouver residents know little about, and on Saturday, December 3 the six cultural institutions that call Kitsilano’s biggest park home will be celebrating this hidden treasure with a significantly reduced rate for visitors.

“Music, history, space, sea, and Shakespeare reside together in stunning Vanier Park,” says Christopher Gaze, Artistic Director of Bard on the Beach. “It is truly a Vancouver treasure.”

Vanier Park is home to the Maritime Museum, the Museum of Vancouver, the H.R. MacMillan Space Centre, Bard on the Beach, Vancouver Academy of Music, and the City of Vancouver Archives – offering visitors a fascinating range of cultural experiences within easy walking distance of each other.

The Winter Wander in Vanier Park is a one day event in which Vancouverites and their families can enjoy a taste of what all Vanier Park’s cultural institutions have to offer for one rate that includes all venues (Note Bard on the Beach will be located at the MOV, as the tents are currently down). Adult admission will be just $5 to visit all locations, and children 16 and under will visit for free. Venues open at 10am and close at 5pm.

“Before it became Vanier Park, this area was first a First Nations fishing village, then a Royal Canadian Air Force station,” explains Simon Robinson, Executive Director of the Maritime Museum. “We are fortunate that the Vancouver Parks Board started managing the land in 1966 thereby allowing the space to become public park land and a cultural hub. It's quite unique, but sometimes overlooked as a great destination. Today it’s a place where Vancouverite’s can spend the day enjoying the beauty of the park, visiting museums, taking in a play, learning music, or discovering Vancouver’s history.”

Winter Wanderers will also be able to enjoy food from visiting food trucks, performances by Vancouver Academy of Music students, and have an opportunity to win memberships to the three participating museums.

The Winter Wander is supported by Port Metro Vancouver.

November 14, 2011
Museum of Vancouver’s 70,000 item collection now accessible online

MEDIA RELEASE
November 14, 2011

Image: First contribution to the Museumof Vancouver  from 1896, a trumpeter swan
Image: The first record taken for the Museum of Vancouver

Museum of Vancouver’s 70,000 item collection now accessible online

(VANCOUVER, BC) – Vancouverites can now broaden their understanding of Vancouver history with the click of a mouse, thanks to the Museum of Vancouver’s newly launched digital collections database.

Using OpenMOV from the Museum of Vancouver’s website (http://openmov.museumofvancouver.ca/collection) anyone from anywhere can access information about the museum’s more than 62,000 items, with nearly 10,000 entries currently accompanied by digital images.

“With open MOV, we were able to update the old electronic database while opening the collection to the public. OpenMOV allows the public virtual access to objects when they are not on display,” explains Wendy Nichols, the MOV’s Curator of Collections. “Increasingly, museums are finding that allowing their communities to access the collections digitally not only connects people to history, but also stimulates museum going.”

The digital database was developed with support from the Museums Assistance Program of the Department of Canadian Heritage. OpenMOV was custom-made for MOV using Drupal open source content management system by Vancouver-based Fuse Interactive.

MOV will continue to flesh out and refine artifact information and to increase the number of objects accompanied by digital images. The creation of digital images has been made possible in part by the BC History Digitization Project through the Irving K. Barber Centre at UBC. The Project has supported digitizing all material in the BC First Nations ethnology collection over the last two years.

The digital collection metaphorically throws the doors open to the back-room shelves of MOV. With the information now online, researchers can access images and information about the collection from their desks at home or school.

About the Museum of Vancouver

The Museum of Vancouver is a non profit museum that holds a mirror to the city and lead provocative conversations about its past, present and future.

October 20, 2011
Canadian Submissions to 2012 Venice Biennale in Architecture find temporary home at Museum of Vancouver

(VANCOUVER, BC) – When people migrate, they bring their cultural memories with them and create a unique understanding of the world. Migrating Landscapes, a nation-wide competition for young Canadian architects 45 and under, explores the nature of contemporary Canadian migration through original designs for housing. Vancouverites can immerse themselves in this idea starting Thursday, November 3 when the regional stage of the competition launches at the Museum of Vancouver.

“The intention of the competition is to bring the Venice Biennale to Canada,” explains Johanna Hurme, one of the three young Winnipeg-based organizers and curators of Migrating Landscapes. “We want to showcase the up-and-coming generation of Canadian architects and designers to the Canadian public before they hit the world stage in Venice.”

The exhibition will display videos, in which each entrant talks about how their experiences of migration have affected them as designers, together with architectural models of dwellings that respond to the issues raised in the videos. These videos and models will be “settled” into a modular exhibition infrastructure, or “new landscape”, made of wood.

“When people migrate, they carry with them very specific memories of place and cultural heritage,” explains Hurme. “These migrated memories have to negotiate with their new locale and culture, resulting in an experience in which an immigrant never settles or unsettles.”

“When applied to architecture and design,” adds her colleague Jae-Sung Chon, “the built form is neither of the present location or the past. Instead, it’s a unique form that resonates with both locations and one’s own cultural memories.”

“We think Migrating Landscapes will be a timely and provocative exhibition,” says Sasa Radulovic, who completes the curatorial team. “It will generate and showcase innovative new designs for housing by young Canadians, confront the closing down of immigration policies globally, and project Canada as one of the most engaging and promising models of a multi-ethnic social democracy in the 21st century.”

The Museum of Vancouver is one of seven presenting hosts of the regional competitions across the country. Regional winners will progress to a national final competition and exhibition at the Winnipeg Art Gallery next spring, where a high-profile national jury will select the young, architectural “Team Canada” that will represent Canada at the 13th annual Venice Biennale in Architecture in late summer/fall 2012.

The BC Regional Exhibition of Migrating Landscapes is at the Museum of Vancouver from November 3 to November 27. 

October 13, 2011
Popular bhangra exhibition to celebrate extension with full day of activities for families

Popular bhangra exhibition to celebrate extension with full day of activities for families

(VANCOUVER, BC) — Following recognition by CBC’s Culture Days for its contribution to the community, the Museum of Vancouver is pleased to announce an extension of its unique, community-based exhibition, Bhangra.me: Vancouver’s Bhangra Story. To celebrate, the MOV will host a unique family-oriented day of interactive exhibition programming, food, and performances on Saturday, October 22, from 10am-4pm.

MOV’s family-oriented “Not Just Bhangra” festivities will appeal to all ages, featuring a Special Senior's Lounge, photobooth, and guided mini-tours of Bhangra.me by co-curator Naveen Girn and board members from VIBC.

 “The day’s activities will provide an opportunity that we seldom have—to bring grandparents and grandchildren, Bhangra professionals and amateurs, all in the same space talking, learning and exploring the culture of Bhangra,” says Manpal Rana, a performer, editor of Chakdey.com and member of VIBC’s Community Engagement Committee.

Lunch is included with admission, and will be provided by Sutra Vancouver; admission includes access to the MOV's history galleries, and its newest exhibition, Neon Vancouver | Ugly Vancouver.

Space is limited, so advance purchase strongly encouraged. Tickets are online at http://notjustbhangra.eventbrite.com .

Bhangra.me tells a vibrant Canadian story as it traces the major moments in the local bhangra scene. In addition to early costumes, photos, rare videos and albums, the exhibition features interviews and memorabilia from international artists Jazzy B, Harbhajan Mann, Delhi 2 Dublin, En Karma, and many more.

Bhangra.me is co-presented by the MOV and the Vancouver International Bhangra Celebration Society. It was curated by the MOV’s Curator of Contemporary Issues, Viviane Gosselin, and Guest Curator, Naveen Girn. Designed by local designers, Propellor Studio, the exhibition was created from original interviews, archival video footage, personal photo albums, community consultations, and support from Vancouver’s bhangra community. Over 55 interviews and 100 hours of documentary footage were compiled for the exhibition.

Originally set to close October 23, Bhangra.me will now be open until January 1, 2012.

September 26, 2011
Neon Vancouver | Ugly Vancouver: An exhibition on Vancouver’s love/hate relationship with neon signs

(VANCOUVER, BC) – Explore Vancouver’s gritty, urban past at the Museum of Vancouver’s (MOV) upcoming feature exhibition, Neon Vancouver/Ugly Vancouver. Opening October 13, 2011 Neon Vancouver | Ugly Vancouver presents a fascinating look at the rapid growth of neon signs throughout the 50s, 60s and 70s, and the visual purity crusade that virtually banished them from Vancouver streets.

“The exhibition raises interesting questions about how we collectively construct the way our city is portrayed,” says Neon Vancouver | Ugly Vancouver curator, Joan Seidl, Director of Exhibitions and Collections at MOV. “There was a real push in the 60s and 70s to redefine Vancouver as a green, natural space. While we may love neon today, there was a real outcry against neon signs, which represented a more industrial, urban city.”

July 28, 2011
MOV opens Chosen Family Portraits - Tuesday August 2nd

The Museum of Vancouver has partnered with the Queer Film Festival and Options for Sexual Health to launch the extraordinary photography exhibit Chosen Family Portraits.

Chosen Family Portraits is a project where the Festival audience were asked to model with their chosen families and to share their stories. A total of 28 families visited the portrait studio to pose with their loved ones, bffs, kids, parents, neighbours, allies and whomever they considered chosen family.

The families and media are invited to view their family portraits on display at the Museum of Vancouver on Tuesday August 2nd and it will be open to the public on Wednesday August 3rd   until late September.

 

July 26, 2011
Summer Fun at MOV: 5 Things to do in Kits

 

Raincouver/Vancouver – no need to give up on summer fun yet! Museum of Vancouver has interactive exhibits and events that will have you, friends and family forgetting about the sun in no time.

April 27, 2011
Bhangra.me: Vancouver's Bhangra Story - Groundbreaking Feature Exhibit Opens at MOV

Politics, identity and music intersect in Bhangra.me: Vancouver’s Bhangra Story, opening May 5 at Museum of Vancouver.

March 22, 2011
MOV Asks: Mansion, Apartment, Shack or House?

 

MOV Asks: Mansion, Apartment, Shack or House?
Museum of Vancouver invites Vancouverites to talk about their priorities for the future of our city’s architecture with new MASHNOTES installation.
November 03, 2010
A Local Food Top Ten with the authors of The 100-Mile Diet

After completing their critically acclaimed book The 100-Mile Diet, James MacKinnon and Alisa Smith embarked on a North American tour that took them to some of the greatest and most unheralded local food hotspots today. What they discovered were dozens of inventive and effective local projects that point toward a very different future for food. Join us on November 25th when they will share the top ten findings from their travels at the Museum of Vancouver’s Food and Beers Speaker Series event.

October 14, 2010
Sechelt Nation and Museum of Vancouver to Complete Historic Repatriation of Sacred Stone Figure

Chief Gary Feschuk of the Sechelt Indian Band (shíshálh First Nation) will lead a delegation to Museum of Vancouver (MOV) to reclaim a prehistoric stone sculpture of enduring spiritual significance to his people, Friday October 15.

August 19, 2010
Home Grown: Local Sustainable Food

The exhibit Home Grown: Local Sustainable Food, is a visual feast of 39 Brian Harris photographs set across four seasons, opening on August 26, 2010 and running to January 2, 2011.

May 20, 2010
MOV Wins National Award for Innovation

Museum of Vancouver (MOV) wins a Canadian Museums Association (CMA) award for outstanding achievement in management.

April 20, 2010
Vancouver's Rock Stars of Footwear Exposed

Museum of Vancouver presents Fox, Fluevog & Friends: The story behind the shoes, May 14 to September 26, 2010

Meet John Fluevog, Peter Fox and Ken Rice: friends, collaborators, trend-spotters, businessmen, and artists. MOV’s fashion retrospective explores the story behind their footwear companies, from their early days making the scene in 1970s Gastown to acclaim and powerful brand loyalty on an international scale.

March 17, 2010
Olympic Partners to create legacy collection of 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games memorabilia

The City of Vancouver is working with the Canadian Olympic Committee, the Province, Whistler, the Federal Government, the Four Host First Nations, and VANOC to assemble a legacy collection from the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

January 20, 2010
Immersive maze installation by Ed Pien comes to MOV

Museum of Vancouver (MOV) presents Tracing Night, February 4 to April 11, 2010. Presented with Vancouver 2010 Cultural Olympiad.

Toronto-based visual artist, Ed Pien has become widely known for what have been called his “magical” paper maze installations. Tracing Night is one of the most celebrated of the series – this glowing labyrinth combines drawing, video projections and haunting soundscapes to recreate the phenomenon of night and darkness.

January 07, 2010
MOV showcases Canadian and Korean craft to the world

Museum of Vancouver (MOV) presents Art of Craft, January 14 to April 11, 2010 featuring exuberantand refined craft from Canada and the Republic of Korea. Presented with Vancouver 2010 Cultural Olympiad.

October 14, 2009
Museum of Vancouver exhibits its Ravishing Beasts

VANCOUVER, BC - The Museum of Vancouver will launch Ravishing Beasts, a provocative, visual study of taxidermy, and a look at the Museum’s own history of collecting. On view from October 22, 2009 to February 28, 2010, the exhibit features over 110 species, about two-thirds of its extensive natural-history holdings.

July 09, 2009
Bike-In Movie July 13, 2009

The Museum of Vancouver presents a free outdoor Bike-In Movie (cycling’s answer to the drive-in) on the lawn behind the MOV in Vanier Park at 9pm on Monday, July 13th -- the same day that the Burrard Bridge bike lane trial launches.

July 06, 2009
Ian Wallace, My Heroes in the Streets

My Heroes in the Streets - Studies for Pictures on Canvas, a suite of 10 compelling photographs by one of the pioneering forces behind the city's emblematic brand of photo-conceptualism, Ian Wallace. On till Sept 7, 2009

June 01, 2009
Velo-City

From commuters to critical massers, fixie riders to kids with training wheels, Vancouver’s Bicycle Revolution gains momentum.

August 19, 2008
The Unnatural History of Stanley Park

We interfered with, altered, and rearranged Stanley Park’s forests, creatures and people to make nature more ‘natural’. With “The Unnatural History of Stanley Park” exhibit, the Vancouver Museum sheds some light on puzzling blind spots in our romance with this national treasure, which turns 120 this year.

April 07, 2008
Movers & Shapers

Brad Pitt’s jewellery at the Vancouver Museum!

January 10, 2008
Contemporary Craft in BC

The Vancouver Museum presents The Crafts Association of British Columbia’s latest exhibition, Contemporary Craft in BC: Excellence Within Diversity, with pieces from over 90 fine craft artisans.

May 15, 2006
Gateway to the Pacific and Boom, Bust & War

Vancouver's Real Estate Boom Ends in War.

December 02, 2014
Unprecedented, Three-Site Exhibition Reveals Archaeological & Cultural Origins of Vancouver

VANCOUVER, BC – Musqueam First Nation, the Museum of Vancouver (MOV), and the Museum of Anthropology (MOA) at UBC partner on a groundbreaking exploration of the city’s ancient landscape, and Musqueam’s early history and living culture. c̓əsnaʔəm, the city before the city is a series of three distinct exhibitions, opening simultaneously on January 25, 2015. The unified exhibitions will connect Vancouverites with c̓əsnaʔəm – one of the largest ancient village and burial sites upon which Vancouver was built – sharing its powerful 5,000-year history and continuing significance.

“People often think of Vancouver as a new city, when in fact it is one of the most significant sites of ancient cultures in Canada – one that has even been compared to other societies such as the Egyptian and Roman societies,” says Terry Point, Co-Curator of the Musqueam First Nation and MOV exhibitions. “Visitors to c̓əsnaʔəm, the city before the city will learn it is part of an ancient landscape, and will discover aspects of Musqueam heritage, culture, and knowledge that have never before been shared with the public.”

Located in the area now commonly known as the neighbourhood of Marpole in Vancouver, c̓əsnaʔəm is imbued with the history and culture of the Musqueam people. First occupied almost 5,000 years ago, c̓əsnaʔəm became one of the largest of Musqueam’s village sites approximately two thousand years ago. Generations of families lived at what was then the mouth of the Fraser River, harvesting the rich resources of the delta.

Over the past 125 years, archaeologists, collectors, and treasure hunters have mined the c̓əsnaʔəm village and burial ground for artifacts and ancestral remains, many of which are in museums and private collections locally and abroad. The land has been given various names since colonialism, including Great Fraser Midden, Eburne Midden, DhRs-1, and Marpole Midden – a name under which it would receive designation as a National Historic Site in 1933.

Today, intersecting railway lines, roads, and bridges to Richmond and YVR Airport, and a miscellaneous assortment of buildings and developments obscure the heart of Musqueam’s traditional territory. The significance of c̓əsnaʔəm to the Musqueam community remains undiminished despite this. In 2012, Musqueam community members held a 200+ day vigil when ancestral remains were unearthed at c̓əsnaʔəm, putting a stop to a proposed condominium development.

Opening simultaneously in January of 2015, these three c̓əsnaʔəm exhibitions will bring the rich history of the Musqueam Nation to the attention of Greater Vancouver audiences. Each exhibition will highlight a distinctive aspect of the significance of c̓əsnaʔəm:

Musqueam Cultural Education Resource Centre & Gallery
Curated by Leona M. Sparrow, Co-curated by Terry Point, Jason Woolman, and Larissa Grant this exhibition focuses on the sophistication of Musqueam knowledge and technology past and present. It makes connections through a continuum of knowledge and expertise over time. The exhibition will feature oral histories, community interviews, hәn̓q̓әmin̓әm̓ language associated with c̓әsnaʔәm belongings on display, and artifact recreation. It will be on display for a minimum of one year.

Museum of Vancouver (MOV)
This multi-year exhibition draws multiple connections between c̓əsnaʔəm artifacts, Indigenous ways of knowing, colonialism, heritage politics, cultural resilience, and contemporary Musqueam culture. It will include graphic and 3D modelling of maps and artifacts, original videography, family-friendly interactivity, and soundscapes blending traditional and modern sounds. The MOV exhibition is the work of a curatorial collective from Terry Point, Susan Roy, Viviane Gosselin, Larissa Grant, Leona Sparrow, Jordan Wilson, Jason Woolman, and Susan Rowley and will be on display for a minimum of five years.

Museum of Anthropology (MOA)
Focusing on Musqueam identity and worldview, and Curated by Sue Rowley and Jordan Wilson, this exhibition will highlight language, oral history, and the community’s recent actions to protect c̓əәsnaʔəәm. Rich in multi-media, it will demonstrate Musqueam’s continuous connection to their territory, despite the many changes to the land. This exhibition will be on display for one year.

Programs
As a way to further educate, enrich, and connect with people, public programming and events will be offered throughout the duration of the exhibitions’ run. The complete range of public programs will include a series of curated tours, cultural exchanges with Musqueam artists, elders, and activists, and cultural tours from Musqueam youth.

For further exhibition information, including complete details on public programs, please
visit: thecitybeforethecity.com

About Musqueam First Nation:
Musqueam First Nation are traditional hәn̓q̓әmin̓әm̓ speaking people whose territory, and dozens of villages, encompasses much of what is now the Greater Vancouver Regional District. Extensive networks of trade and relations radiate up and down the coast and into the interior. Although a metropolitan city has developed in the heart of Musqueam territory, the community maintains strong cultural and traditional beliefs and these networks. Families teach and pass on this traditional knowledge and history to their people, to keep culture and traditions strong. Musqueam people continue to thrive, with a population of over 1,200 people; relying on the guiding principles of knowing who they are and where they come from and the responsibilities they share. Nearly half of Musqueam lives on a very small portion of their traditional territory, known as the Musqueam Indian Reserve #2, located south of Marine Drive near the mouth of the Fraser River.

About MOV:
The Museum of Vancouver (MOV) connects Vancouverites to each other and connects Vancouver to the world. The museum is a gathering place that encourages social engagement and inspires conversation about the future. MOV exhibitions and collections invite exploration of contemporary issues and stories from the past. MOV activities ignite a passion for Vancouver and its people. The museum, an enthusiastic advocate for the city, is an independent non-profit organization that depends on support from the community.

About MOA
The Museum of Anthropology (MOA) at the University of British Columbia (UBC) is worldrenowned for its collections, research, teaching, public programs, and community connections. Founded in 1949 in the basement of the Main Library at UBC, its mission is to inspire understanding of and respect for world arts and cultures. Today, Canada's largest teaching museum is located in a spectacular building overlooking mountains and sea. MOA houses more than 42,000 ethnographic objects and 535,000 archaeological objects, including many, which originate from the Northwest Coast of British Columbia. The Koerner Gallery features one of Canada’s most important European ceramics collections, while MOA's recently opened Multiversity Galleries provide public access to more than 10,000 objects from around the world.

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________________________________________________________________________________
For further media information, contact
Laura Murray I T. 604.558.2400 I C. 604.418.2998
lmurray@lauramurraypr.com

 

October 09, 2014
Vancouver City Shapers Honoured at 2014 Legacy Awards Dinner

Monday evening, the Museum of Vancouver played host to the 3rd annual Legacy Awards Dinner that honours individual, families and companies who have shown outstanding vision and commitment to building a city that is ranked as one of the most impressive in the world.

The MOV invited well recognized city historians, urban planners, influencers in the business and philanthropic sector, as well as representatives from the MOV Board of Directors to the selection table. They spent two months reviewing over 50 nominees who have helped mould the city as we know it today and who continue to influence its path to tomorrow.

The 2014 winners were Wade Grant, Dr. Julio Montaner, Morris J. Wosk and Yosef Wosk.

Grant, the son of former Chief Wendy Grant-John and Councillor Howard E. Grant, was presented with the Emerging City Visionary Award for his work bringing together First Nations and New Immigrants, and forging new relationships between Aboriginal people and the City of Vancouver. Dr. Montaner was recognized with the City Shaper Award for his dedication to HIV/AIDS treatment as prevention, resulting in a decrease in infections and mortality. The MOV Legacy Award was presented to Yosef Wosk for his, and his father’s (Morris J. Wosk) extensive history of philanthropic work, benefitting diverse non-profit organizations, both locally and abroad.

Each of the award winners delivered gracious and moving acceptance speeches. Grant reminded guests of the value of multiculturalism; Montaner urged the public to put pressure on the federal government to adopt the UN AIDS treatment strategy; Yosef Wosk read an insightful poem he wrote specifically for the event, entitled ‘Museum as Matter and Metaphor.’

Museum of Vancouver CEO Nancy Noble explained the significance of the award winners: “At the MOV we see the city as a living artifact, and part of that is recognizing the work that has been done by people to make it what it is today. In this third year of awards we’re really starting to see what incredible minds and initiative we have within our city, and we’re excited to be recognizing this group of honourees for their contributions to our city’s story.”

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Photos of the award winners and the awards dinner can be downloaded here: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/latl1ivzqj39mrp/AADir0Mpxh16YjPXNfmRsMnXa?dl=0

For additional background on the award winners, visit:  www.museumofvancouver.ca/legacydinner

 

About the Museum of Vancouver

The Museum of Vancouver connects Vancouverites to each other and connects Vancouver to the world. The museum is a gathering place that encourages social engagement and inspires conversation about the future. MOV exhibitions and collections invite exploration of contemporary issues and stories from the past. MOV activities ignite a passion for Vancouver and its people. The museum, an enthusiastic advocate for the city, is an independent non-profit organization that depends on support from the community. The Museum of Vancouver is located in Vancouver at 1100 Chestnut Street (in Vanier Park).

 

Media Contact

Myles Constable,

Marketing Officer and Media Relations

mconstable@museumofvancouver.ca

604-730-5309

 

August 27, 2014
Ravishing exhibition revisits fashion trends of the 1940s and 1950s

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: August 27, 2014

(Vancouver, BC) — The Museum of Vancouver is excited to announce the opening of From Rationing to Ravishing on September 18, 2014. This exhibition will feature rare examples of haute couture and Vancouver-made clothing that reflect how WWII changed society.

From the collections of guest curators Ivan Sayers and Claus Jahnke—the team that created Art Deco Chic—and the vaults of the Museum of Vancouver, From Rationing to Ravishing will present more than 80 historic garments and accessories. Highlights include: wartime wedding dresses, Boeing Vancouver overalls, cocktail dresses, and fashions designed by renowned European couturiers, including Christian Dior, Cristóbal Balenciaga, and Elsa Schiaparelli.

The exhibition also includes a dress from Ceil Chapman, who produced high-quality, French-inspired garments. She was reportedly Marilyn Monroe’s favourite designer and counted Elizabeth Taylor and Mamie Van Doren as famous clients. Lauren Bacall’s shoes, Peruvian soprano Yma Sumac’s dress suit and a suit from Miss Germany 1955 will also be on display.

“In From Rationing to Ravishing, we tried to bring together a collection of garments and accessories that illustrate a variety of historical references,” stated Sayers, one of Canada’s preeminent fashion historians. Jahnke elaborates, “We chose the artifacts for their relevance, their appearance, and their stories.” This exhibition will demonstrate how historical events continue to shape our lives.

From Rationing to Ravishing is the second installment in a continuing series of fashion exhibitions with Sayers and Jahnke. Sayers—who thinks of his exhibitions as lessons in history—claims, “No era is better illustrated by an examination of its clothing than the period of World War II and the postwar years of recovery and rebuilding.“ During the war, fashion designers emphasized manliness; clothes were influenced by the need for practicality and economy. In peacetime, a womanly silhouette returned and then, in the 1950s, influenced by indulgence and amusement, designers made girlishness the rage.

From Rationing to Ravishing will include participatory features that engage families, including an activity station for kids and adults alike, and the opportunity to digitally wear period garments. Over the exhibition’s run, MOV will host a number of history-themed events, including two fashion shows that feature exceptional examples from Sayers’ private collection and two “talk and tour” events, also led by Sayers. 

Fashion history enthusiasts will get a sneak peek into the curators’ collection at Oakridge Centre, where five glamorous garments will be on display from September 11th through the 21st. Susan Nicol, General Manager at Oakridge Centre explains their commitment to this exhibition: “As a fashion and style destination in Vancouver for over 55 years, Oakridge Centre has been a driver of the evolution of fashion in the lower mainland. We are excited to partner with the Museum of Vancouver to showcase some of the significant trends of the past and to help bring to the community a little of our shared history.”

From Rationing to Ravishing: the Transformation of Women's Fashion in the 1940s and 1950s, opens to the public on September 18th; set to close March 8th, 2015. Additional exhibition and event information can be found at www.museumofvancouver.ca/ravishing

 

MOV Events:

Curator's Talk & Tour: From Rationing to Ravishing, with Ivan Sayers

  • Thursday, October 2, 2014 at 7:00pm
  • Thursday, December 4, 2014 at 7:00pm
  • Additional members-only dates to be announced

Join Vancouver's preeminent fashion historian and From Rationing to Ravishing guest curator Ivan Sayers for an informative stroll amongst displays of historic clothing within the exhibition space. Follow Ivan as he describes the evolution of women's fashion from wartime utility to postwar extravagance.

Fashion Show: From Rationing to Ravishing, with Ivan Sayers

  • Saturday, November 22, 2014 at 7:00pm
  • Saturday, February 28, 2015 at 2:00pm

Fashion historian and guest curator Ivan Sayers will produce and narrate live fashion shows that complement From Rationing to Ravishing. These shows will feature exceptional examples from Ivan’s own private collection and others.

 

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About the Museum of Vancouver

The Museum of Vancouver connects Vancouverites to each other and connects Vancouver to the world. The museum is a gathering place that encourages social engagement and inspires conversation about the future. MOV exhibitions and collections invite exploration of contemporary issues and stories from the past. MOV activities ignite a passion for Vancouver and its people. The museum, an enthusiastic advocate for the city, is an independent non-profit organization that depends on support from the community. The Museum of Vancouver is located in Vancouver at 1100 Chestnut Street (in Vanier Park).

Images of some of the standout garments and the curators, can be downloaded from this Dropbox:

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/zp6mzocarzwba25/AABx9h_Zl_ghInH3f5bMPc2Ia?dl=0

 

July 28, 2014
MOV Announces 2014 Legacy Awards Dinner Honourees: Morris and Yosef Wosk, Dr. Julio Montaner and Wade Grant

The Museum of Vancouver is proud to announce the winners of this year’s Legacy Awards. The MOV, through its selection committee, discovers outstanding people who are deserved of recognition for their efforts in creating a better Vancouver. The 3rd annual MOV Legacy Awards Dinner will take place on Monday, October 8th at the Museum of Vancouver.

In keeping with the Museum’s vision, to hold a mirror up to the city and lead provocative conversations about its past, present and future, it is appropriate that we recognize those individuals, organizations and even businesses that have and continue to make Vancouver the city it is today.

Each year the committee struggles to make the selections because there are so many worthy candidates. It is exciting, however, to realize how many incredibly people we have in this city and we are very excited to be honouring this group for their contributions to our city’s story.

The Museum of Vancouver will present its Legacy Award to Morris and Yosef Wosk. Father and son, Morris and Yosef have contributed to many local charities. Born in Russia, the late Morris Wosk moved to British Columbia in 1928. His hard work and strict adherence to honesty, fairness and respect for all, earned him success in business, a success he shared widely with the people of B.C. After nearly four decades building a family retail business, Morris turned his attention to the hotel and residential sector. For Morris, achievement in business is only one measure of success. The other being contribution to community. He generously gave his time, energy and resources to numerous causes, both locally and abroad, supporting diverse non-profit organizations. Morris Wosk is a member of The Order of British Columbia, The Order of Canada and has also been recognized for his philanthropic work internationally.

Morris and Dena’s son Rabbi Dr. Yosef Wosk serves as Adjunct Professor in the Department of Humanities at Simon Fraser University where he developed seminal programs such as The Philosophers' Café and The Canadian Academy of Independent Scholars. Active in communal affairs, Yosef is a media commentator, public speaker and published author who has founded and supported hundreds of libraries worldwide, endowed Vancouver’s Poet Laureate, and has lectured at a number of universities and institutes of higher learning throughout the world.  Identified as one of the top ten thinkers and most thoughtful citizens in the province, he is an appointed Member of The Order of British Columbia, a recipient of both The Queen's Golden and Diamond Jubilee Medals and is included in the Canadian Who's Who.

The MOV City Shaper Award will be presented to Dr. Julio Montaner, a Professor of Medicine and Head of the Division of AIDS at UBC. He played a key role in establishing the efficacy of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) and since then has established the role of ‘Treatment as Prevention’ using HAART to simultaneously decrease progression to AIDS and death, as well as HIV transmission. He was inducted into the Order of British Columbia in 2010, in part for his work resulting in a decrease in HIV/AIDS infections and mortality. Dr. Montaner was born in Argentina and completed his M.D. with Honours from the University of Buenos Aires in 1979. After completing a one-year post-doctoral fellowship at UBC and meeting his future wife, Montaner decided to remain in Vancouver, joining the faculty of St. Paul’s Hospital/UBC. He was invited to run the new HIV department that was being established in response to the emerging AIDS crisis. In 1992, he was joined by Michael O’Shaughnessy to found the B.C. Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS. In 1996, Dr. Montaner presented the results of his pioneering research on triple therapy to treat HIV infections at the XI International AIDS Conference in Vancouver, creating new standard for HIV drug therapy. Dr. Montaner served as the President of the International AIDS Society from 2008 to 2010, and as of 2013, continues to serve as an elected member of the Council of the International AIDS Society.

The Emerging City Visionary Award will honour Wade Grant, the son of former Chief Wendy Grant-John and Councillor Howard E. Grant, who was born and raised on the Musqueam Indian Reserve. After receiving an Arts degree from UBC, Wade worked in many different areas and attended UBC Law School.  He has participated on many volunteer boards and committees around the city and has been actively involved forging new relationships between Aboriginal people and the City of Vancouver. In 2004, at the age of 26, Wade was elected to Musqueam Chief & Council for the first time.  Wade was the Executive Assistant to the Provincial Minister of Public safety from 2006-2007. In 2007, Wade accepted a role in the office of Shawn Atleo who was the Assembly of First Nations Regional Chief at the time.  In 2009, Wade was named the Assistant General Manager of the Aboriginal Pavilion for the 2010 Winter Olympics. Wade is particularly proud of his work as Co-Chair for the Vancouver Urban Dialogues Project, which brought together the First Nations, Urban Aboriginal, and New Immigrants in ways that had never been done before. Recently, Wade accepted a role in the Office of the Premier as Special Advisor on First Nations and Aboriginal Issues.

Taking place in the MOV’s landmark building in Vanier Park, the Legacy Awards Dinner will offer guests an exclusive museum experience complete with live music, fine wine, and scrumptious food. Visit the MOV’s website at www.museumofvancouver.ca/legacydinner to purchase early bird tickets, for background on the honorees, and further details on how the awards were selected.

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About the Museum of Vancouver

The Museum of Vancouver connects Vancouverites to each other and connects Vancouver to the world. The museum is a gathering place that encourages social engagement and inspires conversation about the future. MOV exhibitions and collections invite exploration of contemporary issues and stories from the past. MOV activities ignite a passion for Vancouver and its people. The museum, an enthusiastic advocate for the city, is an independent non-profit organization that depends on support from the community. The Museum of Vancouver is located in Vancouver at 1100 Chestnut Street (in Vanier Park).

 

Media Contact

Myles Constable,

Marketing Officer and Media Relations

mconstable@museumofvancouver.ca

604-730-5309

May 14, 2014
Sasquatch Mask returned to Sts’ailes People

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: May 14, 2014

(VANCOUVER, BC) –  Today, the Sts’ailes Band (formerly Chehalis) will hold a private repatriation ceremony on their land near Harrison Hot Springs, to celebrate the return of a significant artifact in their people’s history. Earlier this week, the Museum of Vancouver (MOV) returned the Sasq’ets (commonly known as Sasquatch) mask to its rightful owner, 75 years after being donated to the institution.

At a ceremony held Monday at MOV, the Sts’ailes expressed their gratitude to the Museum of Vancouver for protecting their mask. A Musqueam First Nation representative also attended to welcome the Sts’ailes to their ancestral land.

MOV’s CEO Nancy Noble explained the importance of returning aboriginal belongings: “I believe that museums have a social and cultural obligation to consider repatriating certain objects from their collections to First Nations people.”

Noble describes the positive impacts of repatriation: “For aboriginal peoples, the return of an object with significant cultural or spiritual value can help to rebuild awareness, educate youth and strengthen ties to a culture that was often suppressed or taken away. And from the MOV’s point of view, the process is a way of building trust and developing relationships with the ultimate goal of narrowing the cultural divide that often still exists today.”

The Museum of Vancouver is proud to be aligned with the Vancouver Airport Authority, supporting sponsor of the First Nations Collection, in developing positive relations while returning artifacts of significance. During another repatriation ceremony in 2013, James Leon from Sts’ailes asked to view artifacts from the collection, believing that MOV might have the Sasq’ets mask, which had been missing since 1939, when it was donated by J.W. Burns. A formal letter from Sts’ailes requesting the repatriation of the mask was received by MOV in late 2013; the museum’s repatriation committee recommended the return soon thereafter.

Noble stated: “Every request is different and must be considered on its merits, but when objects were obtained improperly or have a high degree of cultural sensitivity within a community, repatriation seems like an obvious solution.”

All records indicate that Ambrose Point carved the Sasq’ets mask in 1937 or 1938 and wore it at Sasquatch Days, a celebration of aboriginal sport, ceremony, art and handicraft. Burns who was a teacher at the Chehalis Indian Day School was very interested in Sasq’ets and is often credited for bringing the word “Sasquatch” into common use. The Sts’ailes Band state that due to the mask’s extreme cultural significance, Point would not have sold it or given ownership to Burns, and that Point was dispossessed of the mask without permission.

The Sts’ailes Band has a close spiritual and cultural relationship with Sasq’ets. The Band recognizes Sasq’ets as having the ability to move between the physical and spiritual realms. A sighting or encounter with Sasq’ets is viewed as a gift and as a bestowal of responsibility within the Sts’ailes community. 

The Sasquatch Days celebration has been revived in recent years and will take place in Harrison Hot Springs on the weekend of June 7-8, 2014. This will be a special year because for the first time both the newly carved Sasq’ets mask and the original Sasq’ets mask will be present. These events are open to the public. http://www.tourismharrison.com/Sasquatch-Days

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Museum of Vancouver First Nations Collection Supporting Sponsor: 

Additional Resources:

Photo of the Sasquatch Mask (catalogue #AA69.01) from the Museum of Vancouver First Nations Collection supported by YVR: https://www.hightail.com/download/ZUcwdFdXRStQb0xOUjhUQw

Photo of Museum of Vancouver CEO Nancy Noble (second from left) returning the Sasquatch Mask to Sts’ailes Band elders in a private ceremony held May 12th at MOV in Vanier Park: https://www.hightail.com/download/ZUcwdFdXRStGR0hMYnRVag

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For interview requests or more information, please contact:

Myles Constable, Marketing Officer/Media Relations

mconstable@museumofvancouver.ca

Office: 604-730-5309

April 17, 2014
Museum of Vancouver celebrates 120 years

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: April 17, 2014

(VANCOUVER, BC) –  Today the Museum of Vancouver (MOV) reached a major milestone, as a collector of precious artifacts from around the world and the protector of Vancouver’s past. In recognition of 120 years, MOV will host a celebration on May 29th when admission will be $1.20 (always free for members). Following the Annual General Meeting that evening, birthday cake will be served and BC Place will be lit in the Museum’s colours. MOV’s celebration will continue on their social media channels with photos of artifacts representing 120 years of accessions, shared daily at 1:20pm.

MOV’s 120th anniversary is not only an acknowledgment of history, but of Vancouver’s history. As MOV CEO Nancy Noble explains, “In Canadian terms, we are an old museum with an old collection. For 120 years this museum has been the repository of the material culture and collective memory of this city. We are a reflection of Vancouver’s identity over time. That is valuable in and of itself.”

In 1894, a group of visionaries formed Vancouver’s Art, Historical and Scientific Association. Soon after, the City Museum was created at the Carnegie Library location at Main and Hastings. In 1967, the city announced the construction of the current landmark building in Vanier Park as part of Canada’s centennial. Designed by well-known architect Gerald Hamilton, the Museum’s distinctive dome top was inspired by the shape of a woven basket hat made by Northwest Coast First Nations people. In 1981, the Centennial Museum was re-named the Vancouver Museum and featured permanent displays, exhibitions and educational programs about the natural, cultural and human history of the Vancouver region.

Society continues to transform and museums have had to adapt to that change. In 2008, the Museum underwent a visioning process that resulted in a shift in focus, taking a cross-disciplinary approach and engaging the community in dialogue about contemporary issues of our city. To reflect the new vision, the Museum changed its name to the Museum of Vancouver in 2009.

“We don’t collect the way colonial collectors did, nor do we communicate information in the same way we did 120 years ago,” Noble explains. “As a contemporary museum, MOV wants to push the boundaries of our role. We believe that the power of history and collections bind the community together, but we want to go beyond that to engage our community in building our collections, telling their own stories, debating contemporary issues and hopefully shaping the future of Vancouver.”

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Media interested in a presentation of our standout artifacts representing 12 decades, and a tour of our 70,000 object collection or interviews with MOV CEO Nancy Noble, can contact Myles Constable (below) to make private appointments.

Media Contact

Myles Constable, Marketing Officer/Media Relations

mconstable@museumofvancouver.ca

Office: 604-730-5309

December 04, 2013
Rewilding Vancouver connects the city with its natural history

EARLY MEDIA RELEASE

December 2, 2013

 

Rewilding Vancouver connects the city with its natural history

 

(VANCOUVER, BC) – Vancouver is known for its connection to nature — a unique quality in a major urban centre. Despite this, our city has dramatically transformed the natural environment. Rewilding Vancouver, opening on February 27, 2014 at the Museum of Vancouver, explores Vancouver’s nature as it was, is, and could be.

Rewilding Vancouver is an act of remembering,” explains J.B. MacKinnon, curator of the exhibition and author of The 100-Mile Diet and the recently released The Once and Future World. “It offers a window into a forgotten history in order to look at the present and the possible future with new eyes.”

In 2010, for example, Vancouverites were mesmerized when a grey whale came for a swim in False Creek. Few were aware that, just 150 years ago, hundreds of whales visited local waters each year, including a resident population of humpback whales — famous for their haunting underwater songs. Rewilding Vancouver seeks to encourage people to discover such stories from Vancouver’s past as inspiration to imagine a wilder city today.

The first major exhibition on urban historical ecology in Canada, Rewilding Vancouver features 12 tableaux that mix taxidermy, material culture, projection and sound to reveal the natural “understory” of familiar Vancouver locations. An extinct Steller’s sea cow hovers over the Stanley Park Seawall and a coyote remembers Expo 86, while 120 km of former fish-bearing streams flow beneath our feet.

“Almost everyone has experienced the loss of some treasured natural space — whether an entire forest or a simple vacant lot,” says MacKinnon. “This exhibition is a way to connect with that feeling, and to explore the unlimited possibilities of melding the urban and wild.”

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The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization with the mandate to hold a mirror to the city and lead provocative conversations about its past, present and future.

 

Media Contact

Debbie Douez, Director of Marketing and Development

T: 604.730.5304

E: marketing@museumofvancouver.ca

October 16, 2013
Interesting Vancouver returns for a sixth year of sharing how the typical can actually be intriguing

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Click here for full speaker bios

Interesting Vancouver returns for a sixth year of sharing
how the typical can actually be intriguing

(VANCOUVER) – What makes someone interesting? Is it their stories? Their life experience? Maybe it’s their drag persona. Vancouverites can find out what makes 10 of their neighbours interesting on November 8 at the Museum of Vancouver when Interesting Vancouver returns for its sixth year.

Interesting Vancouver is an event that seeks to reveal the richness of Vancouver’s cultural DNA through stories exploring possibility, curiosity and adventure. Ten Vancouverites drawn from the city’s diverse and multi-disciplinary fields are selected to speak for 10 minutes each and answer questions from the audience. With no themes or agendas, it becomes a remarkable opportunity for the audience to also reflect on what’s interesting in their own lives.

“The thing I love most about Interesting Vancouver is that the only theme is ‘interesting’,” says Mark Busse. “No corporate overlords, no profit motives, no self-promotion. Just a room full of fascinating people sharing their hobbies, obsessions, and passions intended to expand the collective vision of what is uniquely possible in our city and by its citizens.”

In addition to speakers, guests will be invited to smash one of Meaghan Kennedy’s piñatas and be treated to a musical performance by CR Avery.

Speakers at the 2013 Interesting Vancouver include:

  • Steve Fisher, Founder and Experience Architect of The Republic of Quality who will share his story about faith, science, love, leaving religion, and the subsequent repercussions.
  • Lynn Hill, curator of Contemporary First Nations exhibitions will share her story of climbing the career ladder.
  • Stephane Mouttet, Chef Concierge of the Shangri-La Hotel on being reunited with his biological parents.
  • Yared Nigussu, Ethiopian artist on the risk of first impressions.
  • Meaghan Kennedy, Piñata Artist on how piñatas have changed her life.
  • Ken Tsui, pop-up event organizer on how Wu-Tang Clan’s debut album informed his understanding of the personal voice.
  • Dave “Peach Cobblah” Deveau, playwright, drag queen, event organizer on how necessity is the root of creativity.
  • Robert Rietveld, former army, navy, and air force executive on Canadian war heros.
  • CR Avery, musician on what it’s like to be a true East Vander.
     

For more information and ticket sales, please visit www.interestingvancouver.com and http://interestingvancouver2013.eventbrite.com. Tickets go on sale on October 16.

 

 

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Click here for full speaker bios

 

MEDIA CONTACT:

Amanda McCuaig

Marketing Officer, Museum of Vancouver

604.730.5309

amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

 

For additional information visit:

www.facebook.com/interestingvancouver

twitter.com/interestingvan

www.museumofvancouver.ca

 

About Interesting Vancouver

In 2011, the Museum of Vancouver became the official co-host and presenting venue. 2013 sponsors include Driftwood Beer, Prospect Winery, The Butler Did It, Eventbrite, MediaTemple, GDCBC, The Hot Charlottes, Industrial Brand, and Kirsti Wakelin.

Interesting Vancouver is an offshoot of Interesting, an event that takes place in cities worldwide and was founded by Russell Davies. Brett McFarlane founded Interesting Vancouver in 2008.

About the Museum of Vancouver
The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization with the mandate to hold a mirror to the city and lead provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.

 

 

 

September 25, 2013
MOV Announces 2013 City Shaper Awards Honourees: Ray Spaxman, MEC, and Tamara Vrooman

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 18, 2013

 

MOV Announces 2013 City Shaper Awards Honourees: Ray Spaxman, MEC, and Tamara Vrooman

 

(Vancouver, BC) — The Museum of Vancouver will present its City Shaper Awards to recipients Ray Spaxman, Mountain Equipment Co-Op, and Tamara Vrooman at the MOV Legacy Dinner, presented by Maynards, this upcoming Wednesday, October 2, 2013.

Honoured for his work as a visionary architect and city planner, Ray Spaxman will be taking home the MOV Legacy Award. “This award is a wonderful recognition of the city planning work undertaken in the ’70s and ’80s that led to the status Vancouver has come to enjoy in the world,” says Spaxman. “It is the result of the creative synergy between politicians, staff, and citizens in those two decades.”

The Livable City Award, being presented for its first time this year, will go to Mountain Equipment Co-Op for their pioneering business. “Vancouver gave rise to Mountain Equipment Co-op in 1971,” explains Shona McGlashan, representing Mountain Equipment Co-Op. “Since then, MEC has grown to become Canada’s most vibrant outdoor retailer … We are delighted to be recognized as a city shaper in the city that helped shape our identity.”

Finally, the 2013 Emerging City Visionary Award will be going to Tamara Vrooman, CEO of Vancity for her remarkable work. “I am honored to receive an award that supports a vision of everyone working together to meet the long-term needs of the community and the people who live and work in this city,” remarks Vrooman. “I’m truly excited about the future opportunities that will support us as we continue to create a city that is innovative, sustainable and inclusive.”

Recipients were chosen by a committee of city historians, urban planners, business and philanthropic influencers, and representatives of the MOV Board of Directors.

“At the MOV we see the city as a living artifact, and part of that is recognizing the work that has been done by people to make it what it is today,” explains Nancy Noble, Museum of Vancouver CEO. “In this second year of awards we’re really starting to see what incredible minds and initiative we have within our city, and we’re excited to be recognizing these three for their contributions to our city’s story.”

Taking place in the MOV’s landmark building in Vanier Park, the Legacy Dinner will offer guests an exclusive museum experience complete with live music, fine wine, and scrumptious food. Visit the MOV’s website at www.museumofvancouver.ca/legacydinner  to purchase tickets, for background on the honorees, and further details on how the awards were selected.

The Museum of Vancouver is thrilled to partner with Maynards Auctioneers on this year’s dinner and thanks them for their ongoing support.  Other sponsors include BDO, Prospect Winery, The Butler Did It Catering, and Lonsdale Rentals.

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The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization with the mandate to hold a mirror to the city and lead provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.

 

Media Contact

Amanda McCuaig, Marketing Officer

T: 604.730.5309    C : 604.312.8791

E: amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

 

About Ray Spaxman

Ray Spaxman, LL.D, ARIBA, MRTPI, FCIP, RPP, Hon AIBC; Architect

Ray is an architect and planner with over 50 years of experience in planning and urban design, with more accomplishments to his name than can be noted in this short description. During his time with the City of Vancouver he established public participation and community engagement in planning, helped in developing the City's View Protection Policies, and produced plans for Downtown, West End, False Creek, Granville Island, Kitsilano, Champlain Heights, Kensington, Southlands, and Fairview Slopes. Since then he has developed urban design projects both here and abroad, including Vancouver's High Building Policies.

 

About MEC

In 1971, a group of west coast mountaineers made a decision to do business differently, and they turned an unconventional retail model into a thriving business. Today, MEC is Canada's largest co-operative by membership and is the leading specialty retailer of outdoor clothing, gear, and accessories. MEC's purpose is to inspire and enable all Canadians to live active outdoor lifestyles.

 

About Tamara Vrooman

Tamara Vrooman; Chief Executive Officer, Vancity

As Chief Executive Officer of Canada's largest community credit union, Tamara Vrooman harnesses the strength of Vancity to fulfill its vision of redefining wealth for members and communities. Under Tamara's leadership, Vancity became the first carbon neutral credit union in North America, the first Canadian financial institution invited to join Global Alliance for Banking on Values (GABV), and the largest organization in Canada with a living wage policy.

 

 

September 05, 2013
Exhibition explores the “Buddha-like” Daniel Evan White and his distinct west coast architecture

EARLY MEDIA RELEASE

September 5, 2013

 

Exhibition explores the “Buddha-like” Daniel Evan White and his distinct west coast architecture

 

I had the impression of being in the presence of a private man, a man who had a Buddha-like quality and who made a house speak the way a Dylan Thomas poem makes a grown man weep or a Lawren Harris clean line painting evokes the grandeur of Canada.”

–Bruce Fraser, in his 2012 eulogy to Daniel Evan White

 

(VANCOUVER, BC) – While Arthur Erickson, Fred Hollingsworth, and Ron Thom garnered international fame, their contemporary – Vancouver born and raised Daniel Evan White – quietly broke boundaries while raising stunning houses amongst Vancouver’s rugged landscape. His visionary career now comes to life in Play House: The architecture of Daniel Evan White, opening October 16, 2013 at the Museum of Vancouver, giving Vancouverites the first glimpse of one of their most remarkable citizens.

“Dan’s work not so much fits its site as becomes one with it,” explains co-curator Greg Johnson. “His clever architectural innovations allowed his buildings to match their dramatic west coast sites.”

White was little known due to his tendency to avoid publicity, despite continual inquiries from magazines, journals, and scholars, and a loyal roster of customers who had him build for them again and again. His name may not ring instant bells, but chances are you’ll recognize some of the more than 100+ Vancouver residential projects he was involved in, 36 of which are highlighted in Play House.

Play House ventures through Daniel Evan White’s mind, hands, and eyes to explore the creative process that transforms the dream home from desire into reality.  The exhibition includes stories from clients and contractors, a replica of the Máté House built to 1:4 scale, projections, smaller models, 3D computer models, and an area where visitors can get hands on with some of Dan’s favourite geometric shapes.

“Dan was a very quiet, modest man,” explains Martin Lewis, Play House co-curator and former associate of White’s. “Those who worked with Dan saw him as an innovator of design. Some of Dan’s ideas were so unconventional at the time that they must have seemed like sheer folly. But now we see not only that they worked, but that they have withstood the test of time.”

The exhibition refreshes our ideas of the typical house and its functions, with each featured project becoming a commentary on contemporary culture, innovation, risk, and the idea of play. Yet again, the MOV strikes out to introduce Vancouverites to one of their own incredibly talented people.

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The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization with the mandate to hold a mirror to the city and lead provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.

Media Contact
Amanda McCuaig, Marketing Officer
T: 604.730.5309    C : 604.312.8791
E: amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca
 

July 09, 2013
MOV and partners to take over Granville Street in day of spectacular transformation and playful design

­­­MEDIA RELEASE
July 13, 2013

MOV and partners to take over Granville Street in day of spectacular transformation and playful design

(VANCOUVER, BC) — On Saturday, July 13 the Museum of Vancouver and its partners invite the public downtown, to help enliven and transform the 700 block of Granville Street using hundreds of super-sized polystyrene building blocks.

“MOV’s Upcycled Urbanism challenges Vancouverites to do more than just talk about urban design, public space, and environmental sustainability. It brings people together to build their ideas in the public realm—but just for one day,” says Charles Montgomery, Curatorial Associate at the Museum of Vancouver. “The project takes advantage of pioneering work by Langley-based Mansonville Plastics, which rescued polystyrene salvaged from the construction projects around the lower mainland and ground it down for use in new blocks. After our event, materials will be returned for a third round of recycling.”

The project was born from the common aspiration of UBC’s School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture (SALA), the Vancouver Public Space Network, Maker Faire Vancouver, Spacing Magazine, and the MOV to offer people new ways to re-imagine public design. Three  teams will use the blocks to create giant games, social machines, and art installations.

The public is invited to watch, encourage builders, and experience the interactive landscape at any time between 10:00am and 6:00pm. Orientations for anyone who wants to join a build team will be at 10:00am, 1:00pm, and 5:00pm.

“This project has been an exhilarating and productive challenge for SALA students,” says SALA lecturer Bill Pechet.  “They were asked to design beautiful block prototypes that anyone could use in construction. We’ll be putting the premise of the project and hundreds of these interlocking pieces to the test on July 13.”

People of all ages are welcome to participate. Register by emailing upcycledurbanism@museumofvancouver.ca

Upcycled Urbanism is a Museum of Vancouver initiative in partnership with the School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture (SALA) at the University of British Columbia, the Vancouver Public Space Network (VPSN), Maker Faire Vancouver, and Spacing Magazine, with generous additional support from SALA, Mansonville Plastics, and the Vancouver Foundation.

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The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization with the mandate to hold a mirror to the city and lead provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.

 

Media Contact

Amanda McCuaig, Marketing Officer

T: 604.730.5309    C : 604.312.8791

E: amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

April 25, 2013
Will the Museum of Vancouver be moving?

MEDIA RELEASE
APRIL 24, 2013

Will the Museum of Vancouver be moving?

Vancouver, BC — The Museum of Vancouver (MOV) has been taking deliberate steps towards securing its position as a thriving part of Vancouver’s cultural landscape for generations to come. Today the museum announced its commitment to find an optimal location that will complement its provocative, award-winning programs and exhibitions.

The MOV has occupied its current location in Vanier Park since 1967. While the location is picturesque it is not without its challenges. A study is being conducted by AldrichPears Associates (APA) to define a functional program for the Museum in an optimal scenario.

“We are constantly asked about our location,” said Nancy Noble, Museum of Vancouver’s CEO. “With this study we will finally have a definitive answer to the question ‘should we stay or should we go?’”

Through the study, the Museum is examining many options for its location, the current Vancouver Art Gallery space being only one. The functional program is informed by current operations, industry best-practices, the vision for the visitor experience at the Museum and the anticipated visitation levels at the current location as well as other locations throughout Vancouver.

Isaac Marshall, Principal at APA, said, “There are so many opportunities in Vancouver right now. It is the perfect time for the MOV to prove it is ready to lead the world in redefining the role of a city museum.”

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About the Museum of Vancouver
The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization with the mandate to hold a mirror up to the city and lead provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.
http://www.museumofvancouver.ca

Media Contact:
Amanda McCuaig
604-730-5309
amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

About AldrichPears Associates
AldrichPears Associates is a planning and design firm based in Vancouver, BC that provides interpretive planning and exhibit design services for cultural attractions around the world.
http://www.aldrichpears.com

Media Contact:
Elaine Edge
604-669-7044
marketing@aldrichpears.com

 

April 11, 2013
Museum of Vancouver first North American cultural institution to take augmented reality “to the streets”

MEDIA RELEASE
April 30, 2013

Museum of Vancouver first North American cultural institution to take augmented reality “to the streets”

The Visible City now available for iPhone and Android

Vancouver, BC, Canada – April 30, 2013 – Today the Museum of Vancouver (MOV) launches the Visible City, a virtual exhibition of Vancouver’s neon history, developed in partnership with the Virtual Museum of Canada (VMC) at virtualmuseum.ca, an initiative of the Department of Canadian Heritage. In doing so it becomes the first cultural institution in North America to have taken augmented reality technology to the streets.

The Visible City is a free app and virtual exhibition that allows users to discover the rise, fall and revival of neon in Vancouver. The app provides walking tours of Vancouver’s most colorful neighborhoods and users can actively contribute to the history of 57 of Vancouver’s neon signs by uploading their own stories, sharing them with others and voting on their favorite signs and places.

At the MOV, we consider the entire city our artifact, and the Visible City is one of those ways we can take history beyond the walls of the Museum,” explains Hanna Cho, MOV Curator of Audience Engagement. “The app is like taking a piece of Vancouver’s history around with you in your pocket – but it’s a piece of history that you can actively contribute to.”

Users can explore two digitally guided walking tours through Vancouver’s cultural heart (Granville Street) and the city’s original downtown hub (Chinatown and Hastings Street). By holding their cameras up to the present day scene, they can see the same Vancouver location appear as it did in the 1950s, 60s or 70s. Users can then listen to over 40 pre-curated stories on audio and video told by  celebrated Vancouverites like Dal Richards (big band musician), Joe Keithley (of DOA), Judy Graves (City of Vancouver advocate for the homeless) and more.

The Visible City is free to download and is available via the iTunes App Store and Google Play. The Visible City gratefully acknowledges the funding support of the VMC at www.virtualmuseum.ca, an initiative of the Department of Canadian Heritage. For more information visit www.museumofvancouver.ca/visiblecity

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The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization with the mandate to hold a mirror to the city and lead provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.

Media Contact
Amanda McCuaig, Marketing Officer
T: 604.730.5309    C : 604.312.8791
E: amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

March 27, 2013
Foncie Pulice, Vancouver’s most prolific street photographer, in retrospective at Museum of Vancouver

MEDIA RELEASE
March 27, 2013

Foncie Pulice, Vancouver’s most prolific street photographer, in retrospective at Museum of Vancouver

(VANCOUVER, BC) –Taking thousands of photos each year and about 15 million photos over his lifetime, Foncie Pulice was Vancouver’s most prolific and beloved street photographer. Many long-time Vancouver families have Foncie photos in their albums – and the stories to go with them. Foncie’s Fotos: Man on the Street, opening at the Museum of Vancouver on June 6, 2013, reveals the life and workstyle of this Vancouver photographer.

Foncie Pulice shot from locations along Granville and Hastings for almost 40 years. He photographed without discrimination, capturing the full range of ages, ethnicities, and classes that thronged downtown. At a time when personal cameras were rare and family portraits were expensive, Foncie sometimes created the only surviving image of a family member.

“Foncie captured people in motion, literally in mid-stride, stepping with energy into Vancouver’s future,” explains Joan Siedl, exhibition curator. “His camera lens was fixed at about waist height and pointing slightly up, so that everyone appears slightly larger than life, commanding their patch of sidewalk for an instant.”

Foncie claimed that he destroyed all of his negatives, but he did not. The exhibition will include projected images from a surviving reel of over 10,000 negatives shot in May and June 1968 on Granville near Robson. If you happened to walk south on the east side of the 700 block of Granville Street that spring, Foncie may have taken your photo as you passed.

Foncie’s camera, which he donated to the Museum when he retired in 1979, is a gimcrack assemblage of war surplus metal plate on wheels decorated with a red plastic lightening bolt. Its flash was powered by a car battery. The camera used large reels of movie film so that Foncie could shoot for hours on end.

The exhibition has worked in collaboration with the Knowledge Network, which is producing shorts about Foncie that will be shown in the exhibition, as well as a feature documentary that will premiere later in the year. Those with photo taken by Foncie are encouraged to upload and share via “Foncie’s Corner” on the Knowledge Network (fonciescorner.knowledge.ca).  

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The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization with the mandate to hold a mirror to the city and lead provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.

Media Contact
Amanda McCuaig, Marketing Officer
T: 604.730.5309    C : 604.312.8791
E: amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

January 17, 2013
Winter Wander celebrates Vanier Park, a Vancouver hidden treasure

For Immediate Release
January 17, 2013

Winter Wander celebrates Vanier Park, a Vancouver hidden treasure

(Vancouver, BC) – The six cultural institutions of Vanier Park are celebrating their Kitsilano location again during their second Winter Wander. Vancouverites are invited to attend all locations on Saturday, January 26, for one significantly reduced rate.

“We had such a wonderful turn out at our first Winter Wander that we’ve been looking forward to doing it again all year,” says Simon Robinson, Executive Director of the Vancouver Maritime Museum “For us, it’s a great way to showcase what’s down here in Vanier Park, and to work together as institutions. This park and its venues are truly a Vancouver treasure.”

Vanier Park is home to the Vancouver Maritime Museum, the Museum of Vancouver, the H.R. MacMillan Space Centre, Bard on the Beach, the Vancouver Academy of Music, and the City of Vancouver Archives.

The Winter Wander in Vanier Park is a one day event in which Vancouverites and their families can enjoy a taste of what Vanier Park’s cultural institutions have to offer for one rate that includes admission to all venues. Adult admission will be just $5 to visit all locations, and children 16 and under will visit for free.

“When the Royal Canadian Air Force station that occupied this area was decommissioned in the 1960’s the Vancouver Parks Board took over management of the land,” explains Robinson. “This enabled the space to become public park land and a cultural hub. It's very unique, but sometimes overlooked. Adjacent to the downtown heart of our city, today it’s a place where Vancouverite’s can spend the day enjoying the beauty of the park, visiting museums, taking in a play, discovering music, or learning about Vancouver’s history.”

In addition to visiting the museums, Winter Wanderers will be able to enjoy a talk by Christopher Gaze of Bard on the Beach, performances by Vancouver Academy of Music students, and visiting food trucks.

For full schedule of events, visit www.museumofvancouver/winterwander.

The Winter Wander is supported by Port Metro Vancouver.

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For media inquiries contact:
Amanda McCuaig
Marketing Officer, Museum of Vancouver
604-730-5309
amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

January 08, 2013
Talking Sex in Vancouver - New Exhibition at the MOV

MEDIA RELEASE
January 8, 2013

Talking Sex in Vancouver
Museum of Vancouver tackles taboo subject by exploring its cultural history

(VANCOUVER, BC) – What better to do on Valentine’s Day, than throw open the doors to an exhibition dedicated to Vancouver’s sexual history? Sex Talk in the City, the Museum of Vancouver’s newest exhibition, opens February 14, 2013, and will give visitors a chance to consider how sexuality is not only biological, but also cultural and political. 

Moving from the classroom, to the bedroom, to the streets, Sex Talk in the City explores how sexuality is learned (at school, in the media, through popular culture) and how these conversations have impacted the way people self-identify and relate to each other.

“Exploring what people in Vancouver think about sex becomes a telling way to know the city,” explains Viviane Gosselin, Sex Talk’s curatorial lead. “Looking at Vancouver’s sexual history has enabled us to see that many people in the city have challenged the sexual norms of their time — whether it is on issues of contraception, gay rights, or the ergonomics of sex toys — to create communities that are more inclusive and educated.”

The exhibition shares stories ranging from early sex education in Vancouver, to political movements that began at our local universities, to the local origin of the iconic black cougar logo that for decades warned movie audiences about sexually explicit content. It also touches on issues of sex trade work, the role of the Internet as “sex educator” to many children, and how the pleasure of belonging can be as important as pleasure itself.

In the collaborative style that Gosselin brought to the award-winning Bhangra.me exhibition, Sex Talk in the City was created with an advisory panel of 17 people, and a team that included the design studio Propellor, a writer, filmmaker, and several historians.

“Working with a large advisory committee has played a crucial role in this project,” says Gosselin. “Committee members stressed the importance of featuring diverse perspectives while highlighting concerns that are often shared across age, gender, ethnicity and sexual orientation.”

Sex Talk in the City is a unique opportunity to reflect on personal ideas about sexuality (where they came from, the values that shaped them, and how they help or impede our ability to live a healthy sexual life) in a safe, fun, and interesting environment. Visitors are sure to leave wanting to share their own quirky stories about their first time, their sex ed class experience, or the awkward birds and bees conversation they had with their parents.

The creation of Sex Talk in the City involved the participation of Options for Sexual Health, the Vancouver Queer Film Festival, the Vancouver School Board, public health experts, activists, sexologists, educators, youth, and historians.

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Large format images of Sex Talk in the City and related artifacts are available on request.

The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization with the mandate to hold a mirror to the city and lead provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.

Media Contact
Amanda McCuaig, Marketing Officer
T: 604.730.5309    C : 604.312.8791
E: amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

November 06, 2012
Museum of Vancouver launches retail collection around the city

Media Release
November 6, 2012

Museum of Vancouver launches retail collection around the city

Vancouver (BC) — The Museum of Vancouver (MOV) has partnered with local businesses to breathe new life into artifacts and make them available for culture lovers to take history home with them via a new retail collection.

In an initiative that goes beyond the traditional approach of cultural institutions of hosting a gift shop on location, the MOV has created a model that works directly with local retailers to produce and stock items inspired by the MOV collection.

“This new model is a great way to take the MOV brand and our array of historical artifacts out to the city,” says Kate Follington, Director of Development at the MOV. “Given that we can only ever display a fraction of our collection, it is a way for us to breathe new life into artifacts and raise funds to continue our work.”

The project sees the MOV working with multiple Vancouver businesses, including Harvey Burritt’s 2nd Century Rug Company, Country Furniture, Cascade Room Restaurant & Bar, Walrus, Make Vancouver, Vancouver Special, Bookmark at the Vancouver Public Library, London Drugs, and Murchie’s Teas.

“When the MOV approached us to be part of the program, we jumped at the opportunity,” says Harvey Burritt of 2nd Century Rug Company. “We are known for our ability to create high quality, custom area rugs from items that are meaningful to our clients. We have applied this ability to the treasure trove of MOV’s collection. I can’t think of a better way for my family to support one of our city’s cultural institutions.”

In addition to the rugs, products include keychains, coasters, T-shirts, pillows, beer glasses, and a specially concocted Smilin’ Buddha tea from Murchie’s. Each product comes with a history of the original artifact and a catalogue number so that buyers can look the artifact up on openMOV (openmov.museumofvancouver.ca). Products and locations can be found online at www.museumofvancouver.ca/retail .

The retail line is part of a project supported by the Vancity Social Enterprise Portfolio and is being developed as an alternative line of revenue for the MOV. Funds raised through the retail initiative will benefit MOV’s special exhibitions and its school programs that reach 10,000 elementary school students annually.

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The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization which holds a mirror to the city and leads provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.

Media Contact
Amanda McCuaig, Marketing Officer
T: 604.730.5309    C : 604.312.8791
E: amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

October 04, 2012
The Museum of Vancouver Honours Robert Fung and the Wong Family as Vancouver City Shapers

MEDIA RELEASE
October 4, 2012

The Museum of Vancouver Honours Robert Fung and the Wong Family as Vancouver City Shapers

(VANCOUVER, BC) If the city itself is looked at as an artifact, to whom do we credit its creation? The Museum of Vancouver — in its ongoing mission to hold a mirror to the city and provoke dialogue about its past, present, and future — has responded to this question with a new award. The first inaugural Vancouver City Shapers Award will be presented on Wednesday, October 11, at the MOV Legacy Dinner.

Uniquely positioned to look at the entire city as an artifact, the MOV pulled seven well recognized city historians, urban planners, influencers in the business and philanthropic sector, as well as representatives from the MOV Board of Directors to select recipients for two new awards. They spent two months reviewing over 50 families and individuals who have helped to mould the city as we know it today, and who continue to influence its path to tomorrow.

The resulting selection brought forward three extraordinary individuals for this inaugural year:

City Legacy Award:                                      Milton and Fei Wong
Emerging City Visionary Award:                Robert Fung

The City Legacy Award acknowledges Milton and Fei’s extraordinary contribution and influence over the city’s celebration of diversity, academic success, and mentorship of business innovators and new entrepreneurs.

“They touched so many sectors in Vancouver with their idealism and leadership, from finance and philanthropy to diversity and culture,” explains Nancy Noble, Museum of Vancouver CEO. “Their legacy is our harmonious and diverse city.”

The Emerging City Visionary Award recognizes individuals shaping Vancouver for tomorrow. Salient Group partner and developer Robert Fung will receive this award for his successful preservation and revitalization of Gastown.

The Museum of Vancouver’ City Shapers Award legacy dinner will be an ongoing annual award.

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The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization which holds a mirror to the city and leads provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.

For full background on selection committee and criteria, download the PDF.

Media Contact
Amanda McCuaig, Marketing Officer
T: 604.730.5309    C : 604.312.8791
E: amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

October 03, 2012
Giant Dice Portrait Pays Homage to Vancouver Artist

Media Release
October 3, 2012

Giant Dice Portrait Pays Homage to Vancouver Artist

Vancouver (BC) — There are few better ways to pay homage to an artist/designer than to create a portrait made of the same number of dice as the days they lived. Frederick McSwain, a friend of Tobias Wong’s, did just that, creating one of the world’s largest dice portraits using 13,138 die.

Now accompanying the exhibition Object (ing): the art/design of Tobias Wong, at the Museum of Vancouver, McSwain’s piece “DIE” is a tribute to Wong, a Vancouver/New York artist who passed away unexpectedly at the age of 35 in early 2010.

 “The idea of a die itself was appropriate—the randomness of life,” explains Frederick McSwain, who produced the dice portrait for NY Design Week, 2011. “It felt like a medium he would use. The idea of every decision you make and everything you’ve done in your life defines who you are. All of those days symbolically make up the image of Tobi.”

The medium was chosen from an exchange McSwain once witnessed — a stranger approached Wong to ask for a cigarette, and Wong accepted a cheap six-sided die in exchange.

The portrait also pays homage to Wong’s own style of conceptual art/design. Wong was well known in New York as a provocative artist, re-designing every-day objects and making poignant statements about the world around him.

The dice were organized into individual sheets of 361 pieces and then laid to rest free on the floor without adhesive. A time lapse video of the piece being assembled can be seen online.  

US Furniture giant Bernhardt Designs bought the piece in 2011 and is currently touring it across North America. The portrait will be on display at the Museum of Vancouver until the end of October.

The exhibition Object(ing) at the Museum of Vancouver is the first major showing of Tobias Wong’s body of work. Since opening on September 19, it has received public accolades from the likes of Douglas Coupland and Jason Heard (show director of IDS West). Wong himself has been referred to as one of more influential and provocative designers of his generation.

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The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization which holds a mirror to the city and leads provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.

Media Contact
Amanda McCuaig, Marketing Officer
T: 604.730.5309    C : 604.312.8791
E: amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

August 17, 2012
Interesting Vancouver returns to reveal the passions of eight interesting Vancouverites

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Interesting Vancouver returns to reveal the passions of eight interesting Vancouverites

(VANCOUVER) – Interesting Vancouverites from various walks of life will be sharing personal stories at the fifth annual Interesting Vancouver on Friday, September 28 at the Museum of Vancouver from 7:00pm to 10:00pm.

Interesting Vancouver is a conference that seeks to reveal the richness of Vancouver’s cultural DNA through stories exploring possibility, curiosity and adventure. In 2011, the Museum of Vancouver became the official co-host and presenting venue. There are no corporate sponsors, themes or agendas. The format is the same every year: eight Vancouverites drawn from the city’s diverse and multi-disciplinary fields are selected to speak for 15 minutes each and answer questions from the audience.

“The vision for Interesting Vancouver is to give smart and dynamic people the opportunity to share their close kept passions and stories with an audience of curious minds,” says Lauren Isaacson, conference organizer and Senior Researcher and Analyst at Motion Canada. “We hope to spark conversation, interest, and investigation about new topics, events, and people, and for attendees to walk away with new ideas and inspiration to make their own lives a little more interesting.”

“Partnering with groups like Interesting Vancouver is exactly how the MOV aims to catalyze meaningful, interdisciplinary, and socially rich experiences for Vancouverites, and break down cultural and civic silos in the city”, adds Hanna Cho, Curator of Engagement & Dialogue at the MOV. “It’s amazing for us to be able to connect with such a fantastic and creative group of volunteer organizers, and we can’t wait to see what’s ahead as we continue to grow together.”

Interesting Vancouver 2012 with the Museum of Vancouver has curated a selection of speakers:

  • Ron Skewchuck, a Public Relations guru who is also an international BBQ champion;
  • Roy White, a successful international designer who found an avocation in middle age as a dancer;
  • Lloyd Bernhardt, a software developer who turned Ethical Bean coffee guru as a result of adopting a child in Guatemala;
  • Boris Mann, a tech entrepreneur who spent a year sailing a tall ship;
  • Aamer Haleem, co-host for CTV Morning Live who has interviewed celebrities such as George Clooney and Madonna, and covered international events such as Hurricane Katrina and the Concert for Diana;
  • Tori Holmes, the youngest women to row an ocean -- as a novice -- and live to write about it;
  • Corinne Lea, an artist turned business woman who successfully fought city hall at the Rio Theatre;
  • Toby Barazzuol, who spent his childhood in the Stanley Park Teahouse, became an entrepreneur, and then found a vocation restoring buildings and supporting community in the Downtown Eastside.

Driftwood Beer returns as the 2012 sponsor, and is joined by Mark Anthony Wines, Field Notes and Eventbrite.

For more information and ticket sales, please visit www.interestingvancouver.com and http://interestingvancouver2012.eventbrite.com/. Tickets go on sale on September 3.

Interesting Vancouver is an offshoot of Interesting, an event that takes place in cities worldwide and was founded by Russell Davies. Brett McFarlane founded Interesting Vancouver in 2008.

Other links:

https://www.facebook.com/interestingvancouver

https://twitter.com/interestingvan

www.museumofvancouver.ca

 

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MEDIA CONTACTS:

Kathleen Mazzocco                                         Amanda McCuaig
km@clearpr.com                                             Marketing Officer, Museum of Vancouver
604.563.2529                                                  604.730.5309
                                                                        amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

July 23, 2012
Tobias Wong’s cheeky art/design comes home

MEDIA RELEASE
July 23, 2012

Tobias Wong’s clever art/design comes home
Museum of Vancouver to hold first solo exhibition of the forerunner of conceptual design

 

(VANCOUVER, BC) – Opening this September 20, 2012, the Museum of Vancouver (MOV) is pleased to present the first time solo exhibition of internationally acclaimed, Vancouver-born artist, Tobias Wong in Object(ing): The art/design of Tobias Wong.

Wong has been lauded as “contemporary design’s most nimble provocateur” by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and is considered a forerunner of conceptual design. He appropriated, manipulated, manufactured, mass-produced, and re-issued everyday objects — from candies and dollar bills to box cutters and neon signs — pouring new meanings into them in the process. Like many pioneers, his art both seduced and upset.

“Tobias’ work and artistic trajectory are fascinating,” explains Viviane Gosselin, senior curator and project lead at the MOV. “I view Tobias as a poet who didn’t play with words but with objects; most of the time, familiar ones. He took the mundane, the utilitarian, and turned it into incredible sculptures. People ‘get it’ because it’s funny or it connects to popular culture and current events. However, more deeply considered, you can see all these clever references to the history of art/design.”

Although Wong was a ‘Vancouver boy’, his work is better known internationally than in his hometown. Leaving when he was 20 to study architecture in Toronto, he eventually moved to NYC to attend the sculpture program at the prestigious Cooper Union School of Art in 1998. His career soon took off in a big way provoking responses from globally recognized designers like Alessi, Philippe Starck and Karim Rashid and brands including Burberry. Wong kept close ties with friends, family, and collaborators in Vancouver. He came back regularly and worked with people here.

The show will feature over 50 pieces, including well known items like Bulletproof Quilted Duvet, the Ottoman, the “I Want to Change the World” book, and This is a Lamp. Some items have been re-issued specifically for this project (based on documentation and assistance of original collaborators). Reissuing works will allow new audiences to see pieces like Room Partition, the Anus sign that hung in the window of his East Village apartment, Chocolate Wood produced in collaboration with Chocolate Arts , and a series of candies created for Papabubble, a high end candy store based in NYC.

Wong passed away suddenly in 2010 at age 35 in his home in New York City. The MOV has been incredibly fortunate to work with close friends, collaborators, family and guest curator and project instigator Todd Falkowsky in making this exhibition a reality. The exhibition has mobilized the participation of over 50 collectors, curators, and artists from Vancouver, NYC, San Francisco, UK, and elsewhere, including pop culture commentator and artist Douglas Coupland and senior curator of design from the Museum of Modern Art, New York, Paola Antonelli.

"I no longer worry about what title people give me,
I’m happy being whatever fits the context.
I don’t draft or create models/prototypes,
I don’t problem solve,
and I definitely don’t make things to make life easier."
— Tobias Wong

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Large format images of Tobias Wong and his work are available on request.

The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization which holds a mirror to the city and leads provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.

Media Contact
Amanda McCuaig, Marketing Officer
T: 604.730.5309
E: amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

June 10, 2012
One year later – Stanley Cup riot boards from downtown windows go on display at MOV

MEDIA RELEASE
June 4, 2012

One year later – Stanley Cup riot boards from downtown
windows go on display at MOV

(VANCOUVER, BC) – A year after the Stanley Cup Riots of June 15, 2011, the Museum of Vancouver will open Reading the Riot Boards, a small exhibition displaying 15 of the plywood panels used to board up broken windows in downtown.

Boards on display include selections from the windows of the Bay. The exhibition will run from June 15 to September 23, 2012.

For the opening of this small MOV Studio exhbiition, the MOV invites the public to join in dialogue with Vancouver playwright Kevin Loring, City Councillor Andrea Reimer, and photographer Maurice Li in a multi-faceted examination of how the riots altered our collective conscience, spurred new civic conversations, and changed how Vancouverites see themselves and each other.  That is, we invite you to pause, reflect, and share in a discussion that asks: “Is this Vancouver?”

The roundtable will include a visual street-view storytelling of events by Maurice Li, excerpts from “The Thin Veneer” a play written as Loring’s response to the riots, and policy insights from Councillor Reimer.  A moderated Q&A and closer look at selected boards installed in the MOV Studio will follow.

The event is by donation (suggested $5-10, none turned away for lack of funds) | MOV Members free. RSVP online: http://riotreflections.eventbrite.com

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The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization which holds a mirror to the city and leads provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.

Media Contact
Amanda McCuaig, Marketing Officer
T: 604.730.5309
E: amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

About the Speakers:
Kevin Loring is the recipient of the 2009 Governor General’s Award in Drama. "The Thin Veneer" is Loring's response to the 2011 Stanley Cup riot. This profoundly beautiful play investigates who we are as Vancouverites.

Andrea Reimer was elected to Vancouver City Council in 2008. Her appointments include Chair, Standing Committee on Planning and Environment; Greenest City Action Team; Vancouver Economic Development Commission. Andrea is a fourth generation British Columbian who lives right across from her father’s family home at Trout Lake on Vancouver’s east side.

Maurice Li is a Vancouver-based photographer and visual storyteller.  Maurice’s work is informed by his passion for commercial, documentary, and fine art work that focuses on the urban form, cultural narrative, and experiential travel.

May 29, 2012
Young Makers’ Workshops prep kids for MakerFaire Vancouver

MEDIA ALERT
May 29, 2012

Young Makers’ Workshops prep kids for MakerFaire Vancouver

June 16, 2012 10:00am to 5:00pm at the Museum of Vancouver

If you have a young family member aged 13–18 who loves to create and get hands-on, then Young Makers Day is an excellent opportunity for them to build and to introduce them to a community of “Makers” — creative folks who range from tech enthusiasts to crafters, educators, tinkerers, hobbyists, engineers, artists, science clubs, students, authors, and commercial exhibitors.

Participants will become part of Maker Faire, a family-friendly showcase of invention, creativity, and resourcefulness. Come to the Young Makers Day at the Museum of Vancouver to make a cool team project to show-and-tell at Vancouver Mini Maker Faire to be held June 23 and 24 at the PNE!   

At the MOV your young maker can:

  • Create a giant ugly creature
  • Build paper and PVC pipe lanterns lit with LED lights
  • Hack a spray paint can to make virtual graffiti

Young Makers will work with an expert Maker from the community to learn how to manipulate materials, foster creativity and collaboration, inspire other makers, and grow the Maker Movement.  AND participants get to attend Vancouver Mini Maker Faire on June 23 and 24 as a featured Makers to show-off their team’s project.  How cool is that?  Participants become a Maker in just one day! 

Registration is limited and includes all food and material costs for the day. For more information or to register online, visit http://youngmakersvancouver.eventbrite.com .

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The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization which holds a mirror to the city and leads provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.

Media Contact
Amanda McCuaig, Marketing Officer                      Arielle Fraser, Education Liaison Maker Faire
T: 604.730.5309                                                         T: 778.883.8525
E: amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca                 E: Arielle@makerfaire.ca

May 23, 2012
Petroglyph to return to Secwepemc traditional territory from Museum of Vancouver

MEDIA RELEASE
May 23, 2012

 

Petroglyph to return to Secwepemc traditional territory from Museum of Vancouver

(VANCOUVER, BC) – A petroglyph rock that has been in Vancouver since 1926 will be returning to its home with the Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation (formerly Canoe Creek Indian Band) on June 13, 2012.

A blessing ceremony of the petroglyph will take place June 11 at the Museum of Vancouver with Chief Hank Adam of the Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation prior to the petroglyph’s historic journey of repatriation back to Secwepemc traditional territory west of Clinton, BC.  Members of the Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation and the MOV will be joined by Vancouver Mayor, Williams Lake Mayor, the Chair of the Cariboo Regional District, and members of Vancouver City Council.

"It’s been 86 years since the petroglyph rock was taken without our consent from our traditional area,” says Hank Adam, Chief of the Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation. “For Stswecemc/ Xgat'tem it means a sense of empowerment for us to finally have a voice as to the future of this sacred petroglyph rock. It is an exciting time for our community. We look forward to the rock’s journey home."

The boulder, measuring approximately three by five feet and weighing about six tons, was found on the east bank of the Fraser River near Crowe’s Bar back in 1926 by prospector H.S. Brown.  Brown brought the petroglyph to the attention of Park Board chair W.C. Shelly who arranged for its move to Stanley Park in Vancouver.  It took a team of 10 horses a month to drag the boulder from the sandbar along the Fraser up the 3,000 foot ascent to the railhead near Clinton. After years of being in Stanley Park in an unsheltered area where it was subject to vandalism, the Park Board and the Museum agreed to donate and move the rock to MOV in 1992.

In 2010, MOV curatorial staff and its Collections Committee began to explore repatriation of the petroglyph. It was determined to have come from the Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation. In August 2011, members of the First Nation and MOV staff visited the original site of the boulder and began planning for repatriation.

“We were powerfully moved last year when Chief Adam and our friends at Canoe Creek took us to the exact spot where the rock had stood,” explained Joan Seidl, Director of Collections and Exhibitions at the MOV. “It is a timeless place that has endured despite the sadness of the great rock’s removal. The Museum of Vancouver looks forward to working with the Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation to bring the petroglyph home and to the joy that it will bring to all involved.”

After consultation with its people about where the petroglyph should rest after its return, the Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation has decided to place the petroglyph in Churn Creek Protected Area upon its return on June 13, 2012.

A documentary film is being made about the repatriation, and everyone is invited to follow the journey of the petroglyph at www.facebook.com/storyofarock .

As part of its ongoing support of the Museum of Vancouver’s First Nation Collection, Vancouver Airport Authority is pleased to support the repatriation of this significant petroglyph to the Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation.

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Hank Adam and Joan Seidl are available for interview upon request.

Photos of the summer 2011 visit to Crow's Bar and of the petroglyph available upon request.

Media Contacts

Amanda McCuaig, MOV Marketing Officer
T: 604.730.5309
E: amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

Agness Jack, Communications, Northern Shuswap Tribal Council
T: 250-392-7361
E: A.Jack@nstq.org

 

About Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation
For more visit: www.canoecreekband.ca

About the Museum of Vancouver
The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization which holds a mirror to the city and leads provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.

May 07, 2012
Museum of Vancouver receives second Canadian Museum Association Award of Excellence in three years

MEDIA RELEASE
May 4, 2012

Museum of Vancouver receives second Canadian Museum Association Award of Excellence in three years

 

(VANCOUVER, BC) – Vancouver has one more thing to boast about this spring as its civic museum, the Museum of Vancouver, brings home its second Canadian Museum Association award in just three years.

The MOV — which rebranded and refocused its vision in 2009 and won the Award for Outstanding Achievement in Management in 2010 as a result — used that forward momentum to develop the multi-faceted and highly collaborative exhibition called Bhangra.me, which ran from May 5, 2011 to January 1, 2012. Last week at the Canadian Museum Association annual awards night, the team behind Bhangra.me was awarded Outstanding Achievement for best project in the Education Category.

Bhangra.me followed the MOV’s new model of telling Vancouver focused stories, and was a robust educational program designed to examine bhangra music as a cultural, artistic, and political phenomenon in Vancouver. It was comprised of original research and collections of costumes, instruments, interviews, a temporary exhibition, musical concerts, public programming, and interactive social technologies. It was completed in collaboration with the Vancouver International Bhangra Celebration Society (VIBC).

Vancouverites can still see a slideshow of the exhibition, related photos and videos on the Museum of Vancouver’s website (www.museumofvancouver.ca).

The MOV will continue to bring Vancouver innovative, contemporary, and sometimes contentious exhibitions. This fall we’ll house the first solo exhibition of the recently deceased artist/designer Tobias Wong in, followed by an educational exploration of all things sex in Sex Talk in the City, opening in 2013.

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The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization which holds a mirror to the city and leads provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.

 

Media Contact
Amanda McCuaig, Marketing Officer
T: 604.730.5309
E: amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

 

April 16, 2012
High Tea @ MOV mixes tea tasting with fund raising for a special Mother’s Day event

MEDIA RELEASE
April 16, 2012

High Tea @ MOV mixes tea tasting with fund raising for a special Mother’s Day event

(VANCOUVER, BC) – This upcoming Mother’s Day weekend, the Museum of Vancouver mixes learning, fashion, and tea for “High Tea @ MOV”, a special fundraiser for the museum. Whether guests come as friends or as a mother/child pair, they are sure to enjoy this delightful afternoon celebrating their bond during this special sit-down tea service.

Special guest speaker Brendan Waye, an accredited tea specialist known as “The Tea Guy” and tea sommelier program instructor from Vancouver Community College, will provide insight on the traditions and rituals of high tea culture over time.

Guests will enjoy a variety of teas and a delicious assortment of petite sandwiches and cakes. A guided tour of the Art Deco Chic exhibition will provide a base for conversations, and tea demonstrations will provide guests an opportunity to discover new tastes while learning about teas from around the world.

Date:                     Saturday, May 12, 2012
Doors Open:      2:00PM
Concludes:         5:00PM
Cost:                      Individual $40 | Two People $60
Where to buy: http://highteamov.eventbrite.com

All money raised will go towards the Museum of Vancouver’s programs for conserving Vancouver’s history and material items.

Special thanks to our sponsors Herbal Republic, Bernardin, Salt Spring Coffee, and Angela James.

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The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization which holds a mirror to the city and leads provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.

Media Contact
Amanda McCuaig, Marketing Officer
T: 604.730.5309
E: amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

March 20, 2012
The Maraya Project and Veda Hille come together for an exploration of Vancouver’s False Creek

MEDIA RELEASE
March 20, 2012

The Maraya Project and Veda Hille come together for an exploration of Vancouver’s False Creek

(VANCOUVER, BC) – Vancouver’s False Creek has a fascinating history, and its most recent development is explored in an MOV Studio Exhibition now on display called the Maraya Project:  Waterfronts of Vancouver and Dubai. False Creek mythology and history will be further explored in an intimate performance on Friday, March 30, featuring local folk musician and city singer, Veda Hille, accompanied by a visual narrative by Annabel Vaughan (architect and city thinker).

Through Songs of False Creek Flats: Reflections, Veda and Annabel use music, talk, and pictures to animate an area of the city that currently lies primarily dormant. Audience members will be given a hand-drawn artist map in order to take themselves on a local walk through the flats at their leisure.

Date:                     Friday, March 30, 2012
Doors:                   6:30PM
Performance:    7:30PM
Cost:                      MOV Members $15 | General Admission $17 | Student rate $10 (*with valid ID)
Where to buy: http://falsecreeksongs.eventbrite.com

*music and reception to follow

Through photography, video, public art, public programs and an interactive online platform, the Maraya Project explores new forms of urban living pioneered in both countries, showing how we are connected in ways that are both familiar and surprising. Maraya — from the Arabic m’raya for “mirror” or “reflection” — connects the glass and steel residential towers that line the seawall walkways of Emaar’s Dubai Marina and Concord Pacific Place along False Creek, looking at these two cities that are leaders of 21st century urbanism.

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The Museum of Vancouver is an independent non-profit organization which holds a mirror to the city and leads provocative conversations about its past, present, and future.

Media Contact
Amanda McCuaig, Marketing Officer
T: 604.730.5309
E: amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca

January 19, 2012
Extravagant glamour between the wars - Art Deco Chic opening at the MOV

Extravagant glamour between the wars
Museum of Vancouver to exhibit Art Deco women’s fashions from the 1920s and 1930s

(VANCOUVER, BC) – The design style known as art deco began in Paris in the 1920s and quickly gained worldwide popularity. Here in Vancouver, we see the art deco’s geometry-inspired style captured in the architecture of the Marine Building and the Burrard Street Bridge. Starting March 8, the public can also see it captured in women’s fashions of the 1920s and 1930s on display in Art Deco Chic: Extravagant glamour between the wars at the Museum of Vancouver.

“The garments chosen for exhibition have been selected because of their beauty and fine quality,” explains guest co-curator Ivan Sayers. “Some of the most important fashion designers in the world in the 1920s and 1930s will be represented.”

The fashion design of the era was a distinct departure from previous design styles. Drawing inspiration from geometric shapes to evoke elegance and modernity, it was also influenced by an increased ability to travel world wide – bringing inspiration not only from modernism, but from faraway places such as Russia, Egypt, and Mexico.

Visitors will enjoy more than 66 garments on display in this exhibition.

Notable Vancouver items include a black beaded gown worn to the opening of the Commodore Cabaret in 1929 and a red and gold lamé evening dress made from fabric depicting the battles of the Trojan War. Many items on show are exquisite designer dresses with labels such as Chanel, Lanvin, Vionnet, Patou, and Schiaparelli. To contrast these high fashion items is a piece from the MOV’s collection – a modest, yet stylish, navy polka dot dress made by the Aurora Dress Company of Vancouver around 1927.

The garments and accessories on display come from the private collections of Ivan Sayers and Claus Jahnke, as well as from the MOV and other’s collections. Handbags, hats, shoes, and jewelry will further illustrate the use of geometric shapes to create sleek, sophisticated designs.

November 16, 2011
Winter Wander celebrates Vanier Park, a Vancouver hidden treasure

For Immediate Release
November 16, 2011

Type: Community Event / Family Day

Winter Wander celebrates Vanier Park, a Vancouver hidden treasure

(Vancouver, BC) – Vanier Park is a cultural hub that many Vancouver residents know little about, and on Saturday, December 3 the six cultural institutions that call Kitsilano’s biggest park home will be celebrating this hidden treasure with a significantly reduced rate for visitors.

“Music, history, space, sea, and Shakespeare reside together in stunning Vanier Park,” says Christopher Gaze, Artistic Director of Bard on the Beach. “It is truly a Vancouver treasure.”

Vanier Park is home to the Maritime Museum, the Museum of Vancouver, the H.R. MacMillan Space Centre, Bard on the Beach, Vancouver Academy of Music, and the City of Vancouver Archives – offering visitors a fascinating range of cultural experiences within easy walking distance of each other.

The Winter Wander in Vanier Park is a one day event in which Vancouverites and their families can enjoy a taste of what all Vanier Park’s cultural institutions have to offer for one rate that includes all venues (Note Bard on the Beach will be located at the MOV, as the tents are currently down). Adult admission will be just $5 to visit all locations, and children 16 and under will visit for free. Venues open at 10am and close at 5pm.

“Before it became Vanier Park, this area was first a First Nations fishing village, then a Royal Canadian Air Force station,” explains Simon Robinson, Executive Director of the Maritime Museum. “We are fortunate that the Vancouver Parks Board started managing the land in 1966 thereby allowing the space to become public park land and a cultural hub. It's quite unique, but sometimes overlooked as a great destination. Today it’s a place where Vancouverite’s can spend the day enjoying the beauty of the park, visiting museums, taking in a play, learning music, or discovering Vancouver’s history.”

Winter Wanderers will also be able to enjoy food from visiting food trucks, performances by Vancouver Academy of Music students, and have an opportunity to win memberships to the three participating museums.

The Winter Wander is supported by Port Metro Vancouver.

November 14, 2011
Museum of Vancouver’s 70,000 item collection now accessible online

MEDIA RELEASE
November 14, 2011

Image: First contribution to the Museumof Vancouver  from 1896, a trumpeter swan
Image: The first record taken for the Museum of Vancouver

Museum of Vancouver’s 70,000 item collection now accessible online

(VANCOUVER, BC) – Vancouverites can now broaden their understanding of Vancouver history with the click of a mouse, thanks to the Museum of Vancouver’s newly launched digital collections database.

Using OpenMOV from the Museum of Vancouver’s website (http://openmov.museumofvancouver.ca/collection) anyone from anywhere can access information about the museum’s more than 62,000 items, with nearly 10,000 entries currently accompanied by digital images.

“With open MOV, we were able to update the old electronic database while opening the collection to the public. OpenMOV allows the public virtual access to objects when they are not on display,” explains Wendy Nichols, the MOV’s Curator of Collections. “Increasingly, museums are finding that allowing their communities to access the collections digitally not only connects people to history, but also stimulates museum going.”

The digital database was developed with support from the Museums Assistance Program of the Department of Canadian Heritage. OpenMOV was custom-made for MOV using Drupal open source content management system by Vancouver-based Fuse Interactive.

MOV will continue to flesh out and refine artifact information and to increase the number of objects accompanied by digital images. The creation of digital images has been made possible in part by the BC History Digitization Project through the Irving K. Barber Centre at UBC. The Project has supported digitizing all material in the BC First Nations ethnology collection over the last two years.

The digital collection metaphorically throws the doors open to the back-room shelves of MOV. With the information now online, researchers can access images and information about the collection from their desks at home or school.

About the Museum of Vancouver

The Museum of Vancouver is a non profit museum that holds a mirror to the city and lead provocative conversations about its past, present and future.

October 20, 2011
Canadian Submissions to 2012 Venice Biennale in Architecture find temporary home at Museum of Vancouver

(VANCOUVER, BC) – When people migrate, they bring their cultural memories with them and create a unique understanding of the world. Migrating Landscapes, a nation-wide competition for young Canadian architects 45 and under, explores the nature of contemporary Canadian migration through original designs for housing. Vancouverites can immerse themselves in this idea starting Thursday, November 3 when the regional stage of the competition launches at the Museum of Vancouver.

“The intention of the competition is to bring the Venice Biennale to Canada,” explains Johanna Hurme, one of the three young Winnipeg-based organizers and curators of Migrating Landscapes. “We want to showcase the up-and-coming generation of Canadian architects and designers to the Canadian public before they hit the world stage in Venice.”

The exhibition will display videos, in which each entrant talks about how their experiences of migration have affected them as designers, together with architectural models of dwellings that respond to the issues raised in the videos. These videos and models will be “settled” into a modular exhibition infrastructure, or “new landscape”, made of wood.

“When people migrate, they carry with them very specific memories of place and cultural heritage,” explains Hurme. “These migrated memories have to negotiate with their new locale and culture, resulting in an experience in which an immigrant never settles or unsettles.”

“When applied to architecture and design,” adds her colleague Jae-Sung Chon, “the built form is neither of the present location or the past. Instead, it’s a unique form that resonates with both locations and one’s own cultural memories.”

“We think Migrating Landscapes will be a timely and provocative exhibition,” says Sasa Radulovic, who completes the curatorial team. “It will generate and showcase innovative new designs for housing by young Canadians, confront the closing down of immigration policies globally, and project Canada as one of the most engaging and promising models of a multi-ethnic social democracy in the 21st century.”

The Museum of Vancouver is one of seven presenting hosts of the regional competitions across the country. Regional winners will progress to a national final competition and exhibition at the Winnipeg Art Gallery next spring, where a high-profile national jury will select the young, architectural “Team Canada” that will represent Canada at the 13th annual Venice Biennale in Architecture in late summer/fall 2012.

The BC Regional Exhibition of Migrating Landscapes is at the Museum of Vancouver from November 3 to November 27. 

October 13, 2011
Popular bhangra exhibition to celebrate extension with full day of activities for families

Popular bhangra exhibition to celebrate extension with full day of activities for families

(VANCOUVER, BC) — Following recognition by CBC’s Culture Days for its contribution to the community, the Museum of Vancouver is pleased to announce an extension of its unique, community-based exhibition, Bhangra.me: Vancouver’s Bhangra Story. To celebrate, the MOV will host a unique family-oriented day of interactive exhibition programming, food, and performances on Saturday, October 22, from 10am-4pm.

MOV’s family-oriented “Not Just Bhangra” festivities will appeal to all ages, featuring a Special Senior's Lounge, photobooth, and guided mini-tours of Bhangra.me by co-curator Naveen Girn and board members from VIBC.

 “The day’s activities will provide an opportunity that we seldom have—to bring grandparents and grandchildren, Bhangra professionals and amateurs, all in the same space talking, learning and exploring the culture of Bhangra,” says Manpal Rana, a performer, editor of Chakdey.com and member of VIBC’s Community Engagement Committee.

Lunch is included with admission, and will be provided by Sutra Vancouver; admission includes access to the MOV's history galleries, and its newest exhibition, Neon Vancouver | Ugly Vancouver.

Space is limited, so advance purchase strongly encouraged. Tickets are online at http://notjustbhangra.eventbrite.com .

Bhangra.me tells a vibrant Canadian story as it traces the major moments in the local bhangra scene. In addition to early costumes, photos, rare videos and albums, the exhibition features interviews and memorabilia from international artists Jazzy B, Harbhajan Mann, Delhi 2 Dublin, En Karma, and many more.

Bhangra.me is co-presented by the MOV and the Vancouver International Bhangra Celebration Society. It was curated by the MOV’s Curator of Contemporary Issues, Viviane Gosselin, and Guest Curator, Naveen Girn. Designed by local designers, Propellor Studio, the exhibition was created from original interviews, archival video footage, personal photo albums, community consultations, and support from Vancouver’s bhangra community. Over 55 interviews and 100 hours of documentary footage were compiled for the exhibition.

Originally set to close October 23, Bhangra.me will now be open until January 1, 2012.

September 26, 2011
Neon Vancouver | Ugly Vancouver: An exhibition on Vancouver’s love/hate relationship with neon signs

(VANCOUVER, BC) – Explore Vancouver’s gritty, urban past at the Museum of Vancouver’s (MOV) upcoming feature exhibition, Neon Vancouver/Ugly Vancouver. Opening October 13, 2011 Neon Vancouver | Ugly Vancouver presents a fascinating look at the rapid growth of neon signs throughout the 50s, 60s and 70s, and the visual purity crusade that virtually banished them from Vancouver streets.

“The exhibition raises interesting questions about how we collectively construct the way our city is portrayed,” says Neon Vancouver | Ugly Vancouver curator, Joan Seidl, Director of Exhibitions and Collections at MOV. “There was a real push in the 60s and 70s to redefine Vancouver as a green, natural space. While we may love neon today, there was a real outcry against neon signs, which represented a more industrial, urban city.”

July 28, 2011
MOV opens Chosen Family Portraits - Tuesday August 2nd

The Museum of Vancouver has partnered with the Queer Film Festival and Options for Sexual Health to launch the extraordinary photography exhibit Chosen Family Portraits.

Chosen Family Portraits is a project where the Festival audience were asked to model with their chosen families and to share their stories. A total of 28 families visited the portrait studio to pose with their loved ones, bffs, kids, parents, neighbours, allies and whomever they considered chosen family.

The families and media are invited to view their family portraits on display at the Museum of Vancouver on Tuesday August 2nd and it will be open to the public on Wednesday August 3rd   until late September.

 

July 26, 2011
Summer Fun at MOV: 5 Things to do in Kits

 

Raincouver/Vancouver – no need to give up on summer fun yet! Museum of Vancouver has interactive exhibits and events that will have you, friends and family forgetting about the sun in no time.

April 27, 2011
Bhangra.me: Vancouver's Bhangra Story - Groundbreaking Feature Exhibit Opens at MOV

Politics, identity and music intersect in Bhangra.me: Vancouver’s Bhangra Story, opening May 5 at Museum of Vancouver.

March 22, 2011
MOV Asks: Mansion, Apartment, Shack or House?

 

MOV Asks: Mansion, Apartment, Shack or House?
Museum of Vancouver invites Vancouverites to talk about their priorities for the future of our city’s architecture with new MASHNOTES installation.
November 03, 2010
A Local Food Top Ten with the authors of The 100-Mile Diet

After completing their critically acclaimed book The 100-Mile Diet, James MacKinnon and Alisa Smith embarked on a North American tour that took them to some of the greatest and most unheralded local food hotspots today. What they discovered were dozens of inventive and effective local projects that point toward a very different future for food. Join us on November 25th when they will share the top ten findings from their travels at the Museum of Vancouver’s Food and Beers Speaker Series event.

October 14, 2010
Sechelt Nation and Museum of Vancouver to Complete Historic Repatriation of Sacred Stone Figure

Chief Gary Feschuk of the Sechelt Indian Band (shíshálh First Nation) will lead a delegation to Museum of Vancouver (MOV) to reclaim a prehistoric stone sculpture of enduring spiritual significance to his people, Friday October 15.

August 19, 2010
Home Grown: Local Sustainable Food

The exhibit Home Grown: Local Sustainable Food, is a visual feast of 39 Brian Harris photographs set across four seasons, opening on August 26, 2010 and running to January 2, 2011.

May 20, 2010
MOV Wins National Award for Innovation

Museum of Vancouver (MOV) wins a Canadian Museums Association (CMA) award for outstanding achievement in management.

April 20, 2010
Vancouver's Rock Stars of Footwear Exposed

Museum of Vancouver presents Fox, Fluevog & Friends: The story behind the shoes, May 14 to September 26, 2010

Meet John Fluevog, Peter Fox and Ken Rice: friends, collaborators, trend-spotters, businessmen, and artists. MOV’s fashion retrospective explores the story behind their footwear companies, from their early days making the scene in 1970s Gastown to acclaim and powerful brand loyalty on an international scale.

March 17, 2010
Olympic Partners to create legacy collection of 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games memorabilia

The City of Vancouver is working with the Canadian Olympic Committee, the Province, Whistler, the Federal Government, the Four Host First Nations, and VANOC to assemble a legacy collection from the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

January 20, 2010
Immersive maze installation by Ed Pien comes to MOV

Museum of Vancouver (MOV) presents Tracing Night, February 4 to April 11, 2010. Presented with Vancouver 2010 Cultural Olympiad.

Toronto-based visual artist, Ed Pien has become widely known for what have been called his “magical” paper maze installations. Tracing Night is one of the most celebrated of the series – this glowing labyrinth combines drawing, video projections and haunting soundscapes to recreate the phenomenon of night and darkness.

January 07, 2010
MOV showcases Canadian and Korean craft to the world

Museum of Vancouver (MOV) presents Art of Craft, January 14 to April 11, 2010 featuring exuberantand refined craft from Canada and the Republic of Korea. Presented with Vancouver 2010 Cultural Olympiad.

October 14, 2009
Museum of Vancouver exhibits its Ravishing Beasts

VANCOUVER, BC - The Museum of Vancouver will launch Ravishing Beasts, a provocative, visual study of taxidermy, and a look at the Museum’s own history of collecting. On view from October 22, 2009 to February 28, 2010, the exhibit features over 110 species, about two-thirds of its extensive natural-history holdings.

July 09, 2009
Bike-In Movie July 13, 2009

The Museum of Vancouver presents a free outdoor Bike-In Movie (cycling’s answer to the drive-in) on the lawn behind the MOV in Vanier Park at 9pm on Monday, July 13th -- the same day that the Burrard Bridge bike lane trial launches.

July 06, 2009
Ian Wallace, My Heroes in the Streets

My Heroes in the Streets - Studies for Pictures on Canvas, a suite of 10 compelling photographs by one of the pioneering forces behind the city's emblematic brand of photo-conceptualism, Ian Wallace. On till Sept 7, 2009

June 01, 2009
Velo-City

From commuters to critical massers, fixie riders to kids with training wheels, Vancouver’s Bicycle Revolution gains momentum.

August 19, 2008
The Unnatural History of Stanley Park

We interfered with, altered, and rearranged Stanley Park’s forests, creatures and people to make nature more ‘natural’. With “The Unnatural History of Stanley Park” exhibit, the Vancouver Museum sheds some light on puzzling blind spots in our romance with this national treasure, which turns 120 this year.

April 07, 2008
Movers & Shapers

Brad Pitt’s jewellery at the Vancouver Museum!

January 10, 2008
Contemporary Craft in BC

The Vancouver Museum presents The Crafts Association of British Columbia’s latest exhibition, Contemporary Craft in BC: Excellence Within Diversity, with pieces from over 90 fine craft artisans.

May 15, 2006
Gateway to the Pacific and Boom, Bust & War

Vancouver's Real Estate Boom Ends in War.

June 20, 2011 / 7:33 PM
Bhangra.me Press Kit

For media inquiries, please contact:

Amanda McCuaig
Marketing Officer
December 29, 2011 / 10:27 AM
Neon Vancouver | Ugly Vancouver Press Kit

The Press Kit for Neon Vancouver | Ugly Vancouver includes:

  • the press release
  • biographies of the curator, Joan Seidl, and exhibition designers

For high resolution photos and media inquiries, please contact:

Amanda McCuaig
Marketing Officer
January 19, 2012 / 5:17 PM
Art Deco Chic: Extravagant glamour between the wars

The attached press kit includes:

  • press release
  • exhibition team biographies
  • backgrounder on the Museum of Vancouver
  • image info sheet

 

Media preview is schedule for Tuesday, March 6, at 11:00am. Please RSVP to Amanda (see below).

To request high resolution images or to schedule an interview, please contact:

Amanda McCuaig
Marketing Officer
amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca
604.730.5309
 

July 10, 2012 / 11:24 AM
Object(ing): The art/design of Tobias Wong

The attached press kit includes:

  • press release
  • image selection sheet with cutlines
  • exhibition team biographies
  • backgrounder on the Museum of Vancouver

 

Media preview is scheduled for Tuesday, September 18, at 11:00am.
Please RSVP to Amanda (see below).

To request high resolution images or to schedule an interview, please contact:

Amanda McCuaig
Marketing Officer
amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca
604.730.5309

January 09, 2013 / 3:45 PM
Sex Talk in the City Press Kit

The attached press kit includes:

  • press release
  • image selection sheet with cutlines
  • exhibition team biographies
  • backgrounder on the Museum of Vancouver

 

Media preview is scheduled for Tuesday, February 12, at 11:00am.
Please RSVP to Amanda (see below).

To request high resolution images or to schedule an interview, please contact:

Amanda McCuaig
Marketing Officer
amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca
604.730.5309

March 27, 2013 / 10:11 AM
Foncie's Fotos Press Kit

The attached press kit includes:

  • press release
  • image selection sheet with cutlines
  • exhibition team biographies
  • backgrounder on the Museum of Vancouver

Media preview is scheduled for Tuesday, June 4, at 11:00am.
Please RSVP to Amanda (see below).

To request high resolution images or to schedule an interview, please contact:

Amanda McCuaig
Marketing Officer
amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca
604.730.5309

April 15, 2013 / 4:05 PM
The Visible City Press Kit

The attached press kit includes:

  • press release
  • pitch kit with possible story angles and images
  • additional fact sheet

Media preview is scheduled for Tuesday, April 30, at 2:00pm at the Vancouver Fanclub (1050 Granville St).
Please RSVP to Amanda (see below).

To request high resolution images or to schedule an interview, please contact:

Amanda McCuaig
Marketing Officer
amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca
604.730.5309

September 05, 2013 / 1:47 PM
Play House: The architecture of Daniel Evan White press kit

The attached press kit includes:

  • press release
  • image selection sheet with cutlines
  • exhibition team biographies
  • backgrounder on the Museum of Vancouver

 

Media preview is scheduled for Tuesday, October 15, at 11:00am.
Please RSVP to Amanda (see below).

To request high resolution images or to schedule an interview, please contact:

Amanda McCuaig
Marketing Officer
amccuaig@museumofvancouver.ca
604.730.5309

January 10, 2014 / 4:03 PM
Rewilding Vancouver Early Press Release
February 18, 2014 / 11:36 AM
Rewilding Vancouver Press Kit

The attached press kit includes:

  • press release
  • photo intervention from exhibit 
  • headshot of J.B. MacKinnon
  • Follow link from press release to high resolution photo download

Media preview is scheduled for Tuesday, February 25, at 11:00am.
Please RSVP to Myles (see below).

To schedule an interview, please contact:

Myles Constable
Marketing Officer
mconstable@museumofvancouver.ca
604-730-5309

August 27, 2014 / 12:27 PM
Ravishing exhibition revisits fashion trends of the 1940s and 1950s

(Vancouver, BC) — The Museum of Vancouver is excited to announce the opening of From Rationing to Ravishing on September 18, 2014. This exhibition will feature rare examples of haute couture and Vancouver-made clothing that reflect how WWII changed society.

From the collections of guest curators Ivan Sayers and Claus Jahnke—the team that created Art Deco Chic—and the vaults of the Museum of Vancouver, From Rationing to Ravishing will present more than 80 historic garments and accessories. Highlights include: wartime wedding dresses, Boeing Vancouver overalls, cocktail dresses, and fashions designed by renowned European couturiers, including Christian Dior, Cristóbal Balenciaga, and Elsa Schiaparelli.

The exhibition also includes a dress from Ceil Chapman, who produced high-quality, French-inspired garments. She was reportedly Marilyn Monroe’s favourite designer and counted Elizabeth Taylor and Mamie Van Doren as famous clients. Lauren Bacall’s shoes, Peruvian soprano Yma Sumac’s dress suit and a suit from Miss Germany 1955 will also be on display.

“In From Rationing to Ravishing, we tried to bring together a collection of garments and accessories that illustrate a variety of historical references,” stated Sayers, one of Canada’s preeminent fashion historians. Jahnke elaborates, “We chose the artifacts for their relevance, their appearance, and their stories.” This exhibition will demonstrate how historical events continue to shape our lives.

From Rationing to Ravishing is the second installment in a continuing series of fashion exhibitions with Sayers and Jahnke. Sayers—who thinks of his exhibitions as lessons in history—claims, “No era is better illustrated by an examination of its clothing than the period of World War II and the postwar years of recovery and rebuilding.“ During the war, fashion designers emphasized manliness; clothes were influenced by the need for practicality and economy. In peacetime, a womanly silhouette returned and then, in the 1950s, influenced by indulgence and amusement, designers made girlishness the rage.

From Rationing to Ravishing will include participatory features that engage families, including an activity station for kids and adults alike, and the opportunity to digitally wear period garments. Over the exhibition’s run, MOV will host a number of history-themed events, including two fashion shows that feature exceptional examples from Sayers’ private collection and two “talk and tour” events, also led by Sayers. 

Fashion history enthusiasts will get a sneak peek into the curators’ collection at Oakridge Centre, where five glamorous garments will be on display from September 11th through the 21st. Susan Nicol, General Manager at Oakridge Centre explains their commitment to this exhibition: “As a fashion and style destination in Vancouver for over 55 years, Oakridge Centre has been a driver of the evolution of fashion in the lower mainland. We are excited to partner with the Museum of Vancouver to showcase some of the significant trends of the past and to help bring to the community a little of our shared history.”

From Rationing to Ravishing: the Transformation of Women's Fashion in the 1940s and 1950s, opens to the public on September 18th; set to close on March 8th, 2015. Additional exhibition and event information can be found at www.museumofvancouver.ca/ravishing

 

MOV Events:

Curator's Talk & Tour: From Rationing to Ravishing, with Ivan Sayers

  • Thursday, October 2, 2014 at 7:00pm
  • Thursday, December 4, 2014 at 7:00pm
  • Additional members-only dates to be announced

Join Vancouver's preeminent fashion historian and From Rationing to Ravishing guest curator Ivan Sayers for an informative stroll amongst displays of historic clothing within the exhibition space. Follow Ivan as he describes the evolution of women's fashion from wartime utility to postwar extravagance.

Fashion Show: From Rationing to Ravishing, with Ivan Sayers

  • Saturday, November 22, 2014 at 7:00pm
  • Saturday, February 28, 2015 at 2:00pm

Fashion historian and guest curator Ivan Sayers will produce and narrate live fashion shows that complement From Rationing to Ravishing. These shows will feature exceptional examples from Ivan’s own private collection and others.

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About the Museum of Vancouver

The Museum of Vancouver connects Vancouverites to each other and connects Vancouver to the world. The museum is a gathering place that encourages social engagement and inspires conversation about the future. MOV exhibitions and collections invite exploration of contemporary issues and stories from the past. MOV activities ignite a passion for Vancouver and its people. The museum, an enthusiastic advocate for the city, is an independent non-profit organization that depends on support from the community. The Museum of Vancouver is located in Vancouver at 1100 Chestnut Street (in Vanier Park).

 

High resolution images can be downloaded from this Dropbox:

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/zp6mzocarzwba25/AABx9h_Zl_ghInH3f5bMPc2Ia?dl=0

 

For additional information or to arrange interviews, please contact:

Myles Constable, Marketing Officer and Media Relations

mconstable@museumofvancouver.ca / 604-730-5309

 

Press kit includes Press release, web resolution images and co-curator biographies.

December 02, 2014 / 3:59 PM
Unprecedented, Three-Site Exhibition Reveals Archaeological & Cultural Origins of Vancouver

VANCOUVER, BC – Musqueam First Nation, the Museum of Vancouver (MOV), and the Museum of Anthropology (MOA) at UBC partner on a groundbreaking exploration of the city’s ancient landscape, and Musqueam’s early history and living culture. c̓əsnaʔəm, the city before the city is a series of three distinct exhibitions, opening simultaneously on January 25, 2015. The unified exhibitions will connect Vancouverites with c̓əsnaʔəm – one of the largest ancient village and burial sites upon which Vancouver was built – sharing its powerful 5,000-year history and continuing significance.

“People often think of Vancouver as a new city, when in fact it is one of the most significant sites of ancient cultures in Canada – one that has even been compared to other societies such as the Egyptian and Roman societies,” says Terry Point, Co-Curator of the Musqueam First Nation and MOV exhibitions. “Visitors to c̓əsnaʔəm, the city before the city will learn it is part of an ancient landscape, and will discover aspects of Musqueam heritage, culture, and knowledge that have never before been shared with the public.”

Located in the area now commonly known as the neighbourhood of Marpole in Vancouver, c̓əsnaʔəm is imbued with the history and culture of the Musqueam people. First occupied almost 5,000 years ago, c̓əsnaʔəm became one of the largest of Musqueam’s village sites approximately two thousand years ago. Generations of families lived at what was then the mouth of the Fraser River, harvesting the rich resources of the delta.

Over the past 125 years, archaeologists, collectors, and treasure hunters have mined the c̓əsnaʔəm village and burial ground for artifacts and ancestral remains, many of which are in museums and private collections locally and abroad. The land has been given various names since colonialism, including Great Fraser Midden, Eburne Midden, DhRs-1, and Marpole Midden – a name under which it would receive designation as a National Historic Site in 1933.

Today, intersecting railway lines, roads, and bridges to Richmond and YVR Airport, and a miscellaneous assortment of buildings and developments obscure the heart of Musqueam’s traditional territory. The significance of c̓əsnaʔəm to the Musqueam community remains undiminished despite this. In 2012, Musqueam community members held a 200+ day vigil when ancestral remains were unearthed at c̓əsnaʔəm, putting a stop to a proposed condominium development.

Opening simultaneously in January of 2015, these three c̓əsnaʔəm exhibitions will bring the rich history of the Musqueam Nation to the attention of Greater Vancouver audiences. Each exhibition will highlight a distinctive aspect of the significance of c̓əsnaʔəm:

Musqueam Cultural Education Resource Centre & Gallery
Curated by Leona M. Sparrow, Co-curated by Terry Point, Jason Woolman, and Larissa Grant this exhibition focuses on the sophistication of Musqueam knowledge and technology past and present. It makes connections through a continuum of knowledge and expertise over time. The exhibition will feature oral histories, community interviews, hәn̓q̓әmin̓әm̓ language associated with c̓әsnaʔәm belongings on display, and artifact recreation. It will be on display for a minimum of one year.

Museum of Vancouver (MOV)
This multi-year exhibition draws multiple connections between c̓əsnaʔəm artifacts, Indigenous ways of knowing, colonialism, heritage politics, cultural resilience, and contemporary Musqueam culture. It will include graphic and 3D modelling of maps and artifacts, original videography, family-friendly interactivity, and soundscapes blending traditional and modern sounds. The MOV exhibition is the work of a curatorial collective from Terry Point, Susan Roy, Viviane Gosselin, Larissa Grant, Leona Sparrow, Jordan Wilson, Jason Woolman, and Susan Rowley and will be on display for a minimum of five years.

Museum of Anthropology (MOA)
Focusing on Musqueam identity and worldview, and Curated by Sue Rowley and Jordan Wilson, this exhibition will highlight language, oral history, and the community’s recent actions to protect c̓əәsnaʔəәm. Rich in multi-media, it will demonstrate Musqueam’s continuous connection to their territory, despite the many changes to the land. This exhibition will be on display for one year.

Programs
As a way to further educate, enrich, and connect with people, public programming and events will be offered throughout the duration of the exhibitions’ run. The complete range of public programs will include a series of curated tours, cultural exchanges with Musqueam artists, elders, and activists, and cultural tours from Musqueam youth.

For further exhibition information, including complete details on public programs, please
visit: thecitybeforethecity.com

About Musqueam First Nation:
Musqueam First Nation are traditional hәn̓q̓әmin̓әm̓ speaking people whose territory, and dozens of villages, encompasses much of what is now the Greater Vancouver Regional District. Extensive networks of trade and relations radiate up and down the coast and into the interior. Although a metropolitan city has developed in the heart of Musqueam territory, the community maintains strong cultural and traditional beliefs and these networks. Families teach and pass on this traditional knowledge and history to their people, to keep culture and traditions strong. Musqueam people continue to thrive, with a population of over 1,200 people; relying on the guiding principles of knowing who they are and where they come from and the responsibilities they share. Nearly half of Musqueam lives on a very small portion of their traditional territory, known as the Musqueam Indian Reserve #2, located south of Marine Drive near the mouth of the Fraser River.

About MOV:
The Museum of Vancouver (MOV) connects Vancouverites to each other and connects Vancouver to the world. The museum is a gathering place that encourages social engagement and inspires conversation about the future. MOV exhibitions and collections invite exploration of contemporary issues and stories from the past. MOV activities ignite a passion for Vancouver and its people. The museum, an enthusiastic advocate for the city, is an independent non-profit organization that depends on support from the community.

About MOA
The Museum of Anthropology (MOA) at the University of British Columbia (UBC) is worldrenowned for its collections, research, teaching, public programs, and community connections. Founded in 1949 in the basement of the Main Library at UBC, its mission is to inspire understanding of and respect for world arts and cultures. Today, Canada's largest teaching museum is located in a spectacular building overlooking mountains and sea. MOA houses more than 42,000 ethnographic objects and 535,000 archaeological objects, including many, which originate from the Northwest Coast of British Columbia. The Koerner Gallery features one of Canada’s most important European ceramics collections, while MOA's recently opened Multiversity Galleries provide public access to more than 10,000 objects from around the world.

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________________________________________________________________________________
For further media information, contact
Laura Murray I T. 604.558.2400 I C. 604.418.2998
lmurray@lauramurraypr.com